Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(BBC)   Quantum memory is kept stable for a record 39 minutes. Take THAT, stargates   (bbc.co.uk ) divider line
    More: Cool, quantum, quantum superpositions, quantum systems, absolute zero, quantum states, phosphorus, magnetic fields, room temperatures  
•       •       •

2806 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Nov 2013 at 8:58 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



48 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-11-15 09:03:06 AM  
"Yeah, yeah I met Tom! He tripped over the plug and lost all our theses!"
 
2013-11-15 09:08:06 AM  
Did they give it Midol?
 
2013-11-15 09:22:10 AM  
That sounds like a dangerous technology that might attract replicators.
 
2013-11-15 09:30:47 AM  
"'Qubits' of information encoded in a silicon system persisted for almost 100 times longer than ever before."

Riiiiight. What's a qubit?
 
2013-11-15 09:35:10 AM  

RalphW: "'Qubits' of information encoded in a silicon system persisted for almost 100 times longer than ever before."

Riiiiight. What's a qubit?


a cousin of?
1morecastle.com
 
2013-11-15 09:35:27 AM  
Would subby or anyone else care to explain why I should be peeing a little in my pants right now? Or whether I should be peeing in my pants right now?
 
2013-11-15 09:38:04 AM  

RalphW: "'Qubits' of information encoded in a silicon system persisted for almost 100 times longer than ever before."

Riiiiight. What's a qubit?


www.evl.uic.edu
 
2013-11-15 09:38:47 AM  
How long til I can 3D print some of this memory? I need it to run the computers on my intergalactic starship.
 
2013-11-15 09:39:39 AM  
Pfft. 39 minutes? Do we have to get Anubis or Human form Replicators up in this biatch to show them how it's done?
 
2013-11-15 09:42:20 AM  

RalphW: "'Qubits' of information encoded in a silicon system persisted for almost 100 times longer than ever before."

Riiiiight. What's a qubit?


A bit with an identity crisis.

A qubit can be 0, 1 or both at any given time. A bit, on the other hand, MUST be either 0 or 1.
 
2013-11-15 09:44:23 AM  
*sigh*

And they say nothing is obscure on Fark.

The Cos' is disappoint.
 
2013-11-15 09:45:49 AM  

skozlaw: RalphW: "'Qubits' of information encoded in a silicon system persisted for almost 100 times longer than ever before."

Riiiiight. What's a qubit?

A bit with an identity crisis.

A qubit can be 0, 1 or both at any given time. A bit, on the other hand, MUST be either 0 or 1.


So it's bi-sexual
 
2013-11-15 09:51:55 AM  
Yep, that seems about how long they lasted...


img.tomshardware.com
 
2013-11-15 09:52:08 AM  

RalphW: "'Qubits' of information encoded in a silicon system persisted for almost 100 times longer than ever before."

Riiiiight. What's a qubit?


www.biography.com
Sees what you did there
 
2013-11-15 09:52:59 AM  
Thank you. My faith in Fark is restored.
 
2013-11-15 09:57:01 AM  
now i want an army of replicosbys...
 
2013-11-15 10:01:30 AM  

skozlaw: RalphW: "'Qubits' of information encoded in a silicon system persisted for almost 100 times longer than ever before."

Riiiiight. What's a qubit?

A bit with an identity crisis.

A qubit can be 0, 1 or both at any given time. A bit, on the other hand, MUST be either 0 or 1.


He's making a bill cosby reference, specificaly the Noah's Arc sketch. (Cubit=qubit.)

/Riiiiight. Am I on candid camera?
 
2013-11-15 10:03:42 AM  

skozlaw: RalphW: "'Qubits' of information encoded in a silicon system persisted for almost 100 times longer than ever before."

Riiiiight. What's a qubit?

A bit with an identity crisis.

A qubit can be 0, 1 or both at any given time. A bit, on the other hand, MUST be either 0 or 1.


which bit of him are you referring to?
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-11-15 10:06:41 AM  

RalphW: Thank you. My faith in Fark is restored.


Used to listen to that bit on a record player as a kid. Always listened at 45 RPM because, at that age, it was funnier that way.

/lawn, off it
 
2013-11-15 10:12:56 AM  

lifeboat: RalphW: Thank you. My faith in Fark is restored.

Used to listen to that bit on a record player as a kid. Always listened at 45 RPM because, at that age, it was funnier that way.

/lawn, off it


I bet it made the trip down Lombard Street even faster ;)
 
2013-11-15 10:20:56 AM  

DECMATH: lifeboat: RalphW: Thank you. My faith in Fark is restored.

Used to listen to that bit on a record player as a kid. Always listened at 45 RPM because, at that age, it was funnier that way.

/lawn, off it

I bet it made the trip down Lombard Street even faster ;)


"Come around idiot! Come around!"
 
2013-11-15 10:49:13 AM  
Does this mean they can finally bring Beckett home?
 
2013-11-15 10:53:03 AM  

RalphW: *sigh*

And they say nothing is obscure on Fark.

The Cos' is disappoint.


How long can you tread water?
 
2013-11-15 11:05:01 AM  
I don't think subby quite remembers that episode- they did successfully retrieve Teal'c from the Stargate's pattern buffer.
/ashamed I know how to spell Teal'c off the top of my head and what pattern buffers are related to both Stargates and matter transporters
 
2013-11-15 11:41:01 AM  

Crotchrocket Slim: I don't think subby quite remembers that episode- they did successfully retrieve Teal'c from the Stargate's pattern buffer.
/ashamed I know how to spell Teal'c off the top of my head and what pattern buffers are related to both Stargates and matter transporters


Subby is referring to the fact that a Stargate can only remain open for ~38 minutes (plus or minus a few seconds) in normal operating conditions.
 
2013-11-15 12:06:34 PM  

Tyrone Slothrop: RalphW: *sigh*

And they say nothing is obscure on Fark.

The Cos' is disappoint.

How long can you tread water?


Ha. Ha. Ha. Ha.
 
2013-11-15 12:12:53 PM  

jaggspb: skozlaw: RalphW: "'Qubits' of information encoded in a silicon system persisted for almost 100 times longer than ever before."

Riiiiight. What's a qubit?

A bit with an identity crisis.

A qubit can be 0, 1 or both at any given time. A bit, on the other hand, MUST be either 0 or 1.

which bit of him are you referring to?
[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x267]


I`m glad it`s not a Q Obit. That would be sad.
 
2013-11-15 12:46:34 PM  

Felgraf: He's making a bill cosby reference, specificaly the Noah's Arc sketch. (Cubit=qubit.)


Bah. What did he really do after Mother, Jugs and Speed anyway?
 
2013-11-15 12:55:27 PM  

RalphW: *sigh*

And they say nothing is obscure on Fark.

The Cos' is disappoint.


Am I on Candid Camera?
 
2013-11-15 12:58:46 PM  
"A fragile quantum memory state has been held stable at room temperature for a "world record" 39 minutes - overcoming a key barrier to ultrafast computers."

the article continued

"the experiment was set to go on for roughly 2 days.

However, as the crowded room of physicists counted down to the 40 minute barrier, Physics Lab Assistant Chad Lorry (oblivious to the active experiment) walked into the room and opened the box; revealing the cat was in fact dead. Chad later remarked "this is disgusting, you guys should stop doing this and get back to work" "
 
2013-11-15 12:58:49 PM  

RalphW: "'Qubits' of information encoded in a silicon system persisted for almost 100 times longer than ever before."

Riiiiight. What's a qubit?


God help me, but I knew this was straight from Cosby's Noah and the Ark bit.
 
2013-11-15 01:05:39 PM  
skozlaw:  ... A bit with an identity crisis.

A qubit can be 0, 1 or both at any given time. A bit, on the other hand, MUST be either 0 or 1.


And every real number in between.
 
2013-11-15 01:07:55 PM  

dicknballs.files.wordpress.com

 
2013-11-15 01:39:07 PM  
So how is a qubit useful if it isn't 1 or 0? How the heck is this useful?????
 
2013-11-15 01:43:31 PM  

Sidecrab: So how is a qubit useful if it isn't 1 or 0? How the heck is this useful?????


Because if you get the system to work you have no time loss between switching states as all the bites are already 1 and 0, therefore something that normally takes physical time to occur happens instantly giving you near infinite computing power, at least in theory.  I really think this quantum computing thing is a brilliant money pit for researchers with nothing.
 
2013-11-15 02:30:10 PM  

DubtodaIll: all the bites are already 1 and 0


So how can you tell the difference between one qubit and the next?
 
2013-11-15 02:53:12 PM  

obenchainr: Crotchrocket Slim: I don't think subby quite remembers that episode- they did successfully retrieve Teal'c from the Stargate's pattern buffer.
/ashamed I know how to spell Teal'c off the top of my head and what pattern buffers are related to both Stargates and matter transporters

Subby is referring to the fact that a Stargate can only remain open for ~38 minutes (plus or minus a few seconds) in normal operating conditions.


Yeah probably. I just recall they were afraid that once the 'Gate lost the connection it would have reset the pattern buffer and SG-1's resident stranger in a strange land would have been lost forever- they weren't sure if the buffer would have retained any data once it powered down like a PC's RAM.
 
2013-11-15 03:04:24 PM  
Who is this really?
 
2013-11-15 03:05:06 PM  

memebot_of_doom: DubtodaIll: all the bites are already 1 and 0

So how can you tell the difference between one qubit and the next?


Good Question, give me 11 million dollars and I'll try to study it out for you.
 
2013-11-15 03:29:51 PM  

Sidecrab: So how is a qubit useful if it isn't 1 or 0? How the heck is this useful?????


It's both a 1 and a 0 at the same time until someone measures it.

There are two possible states for a traditional bit, but it can be in only one of those states at a time: 1 or 0.

A qubit, however, exists in a super-positional state until measured. That is, it simultaneously exists in all possible states (in this case 0 and 1). This means that at any given point in time a computer made up of any numbers of classical bits can only exist in a single state (whatever the combination of all its current bits is), but a supercomputer exists in 2n possible states all at once, where n is the number of qubits comprising the system.

The key is in applying the measurement. Upon measuring the states, the qubits collapse into their current state (e.g. 0 or 1) which instantly forms a solution to whatever problem the computer was built to solve.

Consider a very, very, very complicated mathematical algorithm. Once built, a computer will work through it piece by piece by applying the logical rules required to come to the final solution. In extraordinarily complex systems (for example, protein folding), this can take extreme amounts of time.

However, if you use a quantum computer, you build it to solve that algorithm and, once built, you measure it. BAM! Instant answer as the qubits collapse into their "real" state.

It's like having a race between two people to solve a particular problem. One person is given a piece of paper with an algorithm on it to solve, the other person is given a bunch of slips of paper with different answers already on it, with the correct answer colored differently. When the race starts (e.g., the organizer takes the measurement), the person doing it by hand has to work through the algorithm piece by piece. The other person just has to take out the colored piece of paper, drop the others and say the answer.
 
2013-11-15 03:40:12 PM  

skozlaw: supercomputer


Quantum computer, rather.

Another way of thinking about it. Consider a 4-bit computer. At single point in time, it can be in any one of these sixteen states:

0000 1000 0111
0001 0011 1100
0010 0110 1001
0110 1100 1111

Give it a problem like 1+1+1+1 and it will do something like:

1+1 = 2
2+1 = 3
3+1 = 4

So it will finally stop in the state 0100

A quantum computer, on the other hand, built to solve the same problem, exists in ALL of those sixteen states at the same time. When the operater measures those states, they collapse into the same thing: 0100. So it instantly collapses upon measurement into the same answer, but it does so in 0 operations versus the 3 operations of the classical computer. By existing in every possible state at once and then simply discarding all incorrect states for the given problem on measurement it is effectively infinitely faster than any possible classical computer.
 
2013-11-15 03:40:45 PM  

Crotchrocket Slim: Yeah probably. I just recall they were afraid that once the 'Gate lost the connection it would have reset the pattern buffer and SG-1's resident stranger in a strange land would have been lost forever- they weren't sure if the buffer would have retained any data once it powered down like a PC's RAM.


Actually, the problem was that he'd stepped across the event horizon immediately prior to the gate being destroyed; since the sending gate powers the send, it couldn't complete re-integration at the opposite end and he ended up stuck in the SGC's gate's "buffer".  If they tried to dial out, it would overwrite anything in the buffer, killing him instantly.  They had to "borrow" the Russian DHD and configure it to activate and re-integrate Teal'c.  It took days figure it all out.
 
2013-11-15 04:41:38 PM  

skozlaw: . Upon measuring the states, the qubits collapse into their current state (e.g. 0 or 1) which instantly forms a solution to whatever problem the computer was built to solve.


Well I just hope no cats are killed in this process.

img.fark.net
 
2013-11-15 05:20:56 PM  

memebot_of_doom: Well I just hope no cats are killed in this process.


There's no way to know until after we observe the results.
 
2013-11-15 07:10:22 PM  

Dingleberry Dickwad: Pfft. 39 minutes? Do we have to get Anubis or Human form Replicators up in this biatch to show them how it's done?


Ba'al was the one who could open every Stargate at once, and do it for the full 38 minutes. Anubis and Apophis were the ones who wished they were as uber as Ba'al (and wished they were as over with the chicas as he was...I mean, alt-universe Ba'al was banging Que'tesh/Vala, who was insanely hot for being her physical age!
 
2013-11-16 03:09:26 AM  
This breakthrough occured at Simon Fraser University, my alma mater.

Also, SFU includes this building, that did get blown up on Stargate SG-1, and again in the pilot for Battlestar Galactica, and many other shows:

i.imgur.com

Picture courtesy of the wikipedia commons.
 
2013-11-16 03:12:37 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: Does this mean they can finally bring Beckett home?


Sam Beckett never returned home.

/saddest line in all the quanta
 
2013-11-16 07:01:50 AM  

MorteDiem: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Does this mean they can finally bring Beckett home?

Sam Beckett never returned home.

/saddest line in all the quanta


Does that mean Sam Becket never died and became God?
 
Displayed 48 of 48 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report