If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Mother Nature Network)   Nothing is more American than Crayola Crayons, Duraflame logs, and Post-It Notes   (mnn.com) divider line 21
    More: Spiffy, Post-it, Duraflame, Crayola crayons, Americans, Duraflame logs, les paul, KitchenAid, Spanx  
•       •       •

1414 clicks; posted to Business » on 15 Nov 2013 at 7:13 AM (39 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-11-15 07:31:21 AM
I have used all of those items... at the SAME TIME!
 
2013-11-15 07:34:45 AM
What are three things that can get you high?
 
2013-11-15 07:39:36 AM
travsd.files.wordpress.com

What are the last three things made in America?
 
2013-11-15 08:22:52 AM
Seriously/  People don't know that Harley's are made in the US???
 
2013-11-15 08:32:29 AM

bikerbob59: Seriously/  People don't know that Harley's are made in the US???


Assembled in the USA.
 
2013-11-15 09:16:50 AM
Bought my wife the really expensive KitchenAid mixer.  The big red one where instead of the head tilting, the bowl moves up and down via a lever.  It's just a giant cast iron thing with a simple transmission gear in it and a electric motor.  The whole thing probably has 10 screws and you could replace the motor in 5 minutes if you had to.  No innovation, no digital readout, no safety mechanisms, no programmable anything.  Just a gear and motor makeup that will outlive you.  It's a thing of pureness and backwardness that is a beauty to behold.  Is it worth $500?  Probably not but man it makes good stuff
 
2013-11-15 09:40:45 AM
Yeah, the Kitchen-Aid blender is amazing. You know some executive looked into it and asked how they could make it better.
"You can't. "
Well can make it cheaper to produce?
"Not without ruining it."
OK, carry on.
 
2013-11-15 10:00:52 AM
They cost a good bit more, but I pay the extra cash to get the New Balance shoes that are made in America.  You can usually only find those at the NB store, along with some that were assembled in the USA.  Much of what you find in shoe stores are made in sweatshops the world over.   The American made ones cost more up front, but I find that they pay for themselves by lasting a lot longer.  The insoles need replacing every year or so. though.
 
2013-11-15 10:23:12 AM
Keep in mind the overall value of manufactured good made in America has consistantly increased over the years, even when factoring in inflation.  Obviously, the value of imported manufactured goods has increased even more.  (IE, the total amount of manufactured goods sold in the US has consistantly increased significantly, due to increases in standard of living, technological advances, and population increases.)  So, the "death of American manufacturing" has always been a fiction.

Now, the number of people employed in such American factories has also declined significantly, due to robots and other automation.  Technological improvements are a significant source of job loss in manufacturing, probably more so than foreign imports.
 
2013-11-15 11:19:59 AM

sendtodave: bikerbob59: Seriously/  People don't know that Harley's are made in the US???

Assembled in the USA.


Got me on that one
 
2013-11-15 11:25:20 AM

JonZoidberg: They cost a good bit more, but I pay the extra cash to get the New Balance shoes that are made in America.  You can usually only find those at the NB store, along with some that were assembled in the USA.  Much of what you find in shoe stores are made in sweatshops the world over.   The American made ones cost more up front, but I find that they pay for themselves by lasting a lot longer.  The insoles need replacing every year or so. though.


I love my USA-made New Balance shoes. Best money I ever spent. Fark buying slave-made goods.

Shall I be wafted up to the skies
On flowery beds of ease
While others strive to win the prize
And sail on bloody seas.

A-FARKING-MEN, Mr. Newton.
 
2013-11-15 12:11:14 PM
CSB time.
My parents live near the purported Crayola factory in PA, and my wife and I were stoked to go to it when we visited, to see some of what we saw on Mr Rogers growing up.
Turns out they don't actually *make* any crayons there - it's actually the "Crayola Discovery Center". Basically, a playground complex themed on crayons. The people who work there were nice enough to explain all of that before we paid to get in.

Similar thing happened when they opened the Legoland place here in Atlanta. Had to wait for an "Adults Night" to go since we don't have kids.
 
2013-11-15 12:43:53 PM
MAGLITE
 
2013-11-15 04:04:27 PM

Geotpf: Keep in mind the overall value of manufactured good made in America has consistantly increased over the years, even when factoring in inflation.  Obviously, the value of imported manufactured goods has increased even more.  (IE, the total amount of manufactured goods sold in the US has consistantly increased significantly, due to increases in standard of living, technological advances, and population increases.)  So, the "death of American manufacturing" has always been a fiction.

Now, the number of people employed in such American factories has also declined significantly, due to robots and other automation.  Technological improvements are a significant source of job loss in manufacturing, probably more so than foreign imports.


I see we're done here.
 
2013-11-15 08:06:39 PM

brandent: Bought my wife the really expensive KitchenAid mixer.  The big red one where instead of the head tilting, the bowl moves up and down via a lever.  It's just a giant cast iron thing with a simple transmission gear in it and a electric motor.  The whole thing probably has 10 screws and you could replace the motor in 5 minutes if you had to.   No innovation, no digital readout, no safety mechanisms, no programmable anything.  Just a gear and motor makeup that will outlive you.  It's a thing of pureness and backwardness that is a beauty to behold.  Is it worth $500?  Probably not but man it makes good stuff


My opinion on those kind of things is that it's just more parts that can break. I'll take plain old no frills appliances any day of the week.
 
2013-11-15 10:43:39 PM

ReapTheChaos: brandent: Bought my wife the really expensive KitchenAid mixer.  The big red one where instead of the head tilting, the bowl moves up and down via a lever.  It's just a giant cast iron thing with a simple transmission gear in it and a electric motor.  The whole thing probably has 10 screws and you could replace the motor in 5 minutes if you had to.   No innovation, no digital readout, no safety mechanisms, no programmable anything.  Just a gear and motor makeup that will outlive you.  It's a thing of pureness and backwardness that is a beauty to behold.  Is it worth $500?  Probably not but man it makes good stuff

My opinion on those kind of things is that it's just more parts that can break. I'll take plain old no frills appliances any day of the week.


Agreed. Mrs. seelorq bought one last summer and we love it--a reconditioned one for half price at a kitchen outlet store. The dough kneading screw thingy is mesmerizing to watch.
 
2013-11-15 11:17:56 PM

seelorq: ReapTheChaos: brandent: Bought my wife the really expensive KitchenAid mixer.  The big red one where instead of the head tilting, the bowl moves up and down via a lever.  It's just a giant cast iron thing with a simple transmission gear in it and a electric motor.  The whole thing probably has 10 screws and you could replace the motor in 5 minutes if you had to.   No innovation, no digital readout, no safety mechanisms, no programmable anything.  Just a gear and motor makeup that will outlive you.  It's a thing of pureness and backwardness that is a beauty to behold.  Is it worth $500?  Probably not but man it makes good stuff

My opinion on those kind of things is that it's just more parts that can break. I'll take plain old no frills appliances any day of the week.

Agreed. Mrs. seelorq bought one last summer and we love it--a reconditioned one for half price at a kitchen outlet store. The dough kneading screw thingy is mesmerizing to watch.


There are certain movies that transcend "chick flick" and "splosions and fights".  Films like Gladiator and Braveheart.  Kitchenaid mixers do that.  They get women all a flutter meanwhile the men look at them with a Tim the Tool Man Taylor "need more power" sort of awe.  Nothing like 30 pounds of cast iron.  I am in awe of the little pto thing sticking out the front which I'm pretty sure can do anything.  Recently bought the homemade noodle maker extension thing.  It too is mesmerizing.  I would hate to get something caught in any of these things.  I don't think there is a body part that would stop one of these mixers.
 
2013-11-15 11:27:31 PM
That Gibson guitar looks decidedly Fender-like.
 
2013-11-16 12:19:30 AM

brandent: seelorq: ReapTheChaos: brandent: Bought my wife the really expensive KitchenAid mixer.  The big red one where instead of the head tilting, the bowl moves up and down via a lever.  It's just a giant cast iron thing with a simple transmission gear in it and a electric motor.  The whole thing probably has 10 screws and you could replace the motor in 5 minutes if you had to.   No innovation, no digital readout, no safety mechanisms, no programmable anything.  Just a gear and motor makeup that will outlive you.  It's a thing of pureness and backwardness that is a beauty to behold.  Is it worth $500?  Probably not but man it makes good stuff

My opinion on those kind of things is that it's just more parts that can break. I'll take plain old no frills appliances any day of the week.

Agreed. Mrs. seelorq bought one last summer and we love it--a reconditioned one for half price at a kitchen outlet store. The dough kneading screw thingy is mesmerizing to watch.

There are certain movies that transcend "chick flick" and "splosions and fights".  Films like Gladiator and Braveheart.  Kitchenaid mixers do that.  They get women all a flutter meanwhile the men look at them with a Tim the Tool Man Taylor "need more power" sort of awe.  Nothing like 30 pounds of cast iron.  I am in awe of the little pto thing sticking out the front which I'm pretty sure can do anything.  Recently bought the homemade noodle maker extension thing.  It too is mesmerizing.  I would hate to get something caught in any of these things.  I don't think there is a body part that would stop one of these mixers.


Another good reason not to wear a tie. That thing has more torque than my first Nissan.
 
2013-11-16 01:52:41 AM
They're all as flammable as churches?
 
2013-11-16 04:13:08 AM
I inherited my mother-in-law's kitchenaid mixer.  It's huge, it's heavy, and quite frankly I prefer not to fark with it because I don't have the counter space to keep it out all the time.  It does have all the bits and bobs though and runs like a dream on the rare occasion it is exhumed from its cabinet burial.  My kid will probably inherit it someday, himself.  It's that solid.  Good old American brutality, that machine is.
 
Displayed 21 of 21 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »





Report