If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(AP)   To help distinguish the literate from the illiterate, seven states are fighting to restore cursive writing instruction. The states of Vermont, Maine and Kentucky when asked to comment ..... replied, We have 'No dog in this fight'   (hosted.ap.org) divider line 102
    More: Spiffy, Kentucky, Common Core, United States, standards-based education reform, Advanced Placement, multiplication tables, Constitution of the United States, Jack Lew  
•       •       •

2545 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Nov 2013 at 8:15 AM (22 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



102 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-11-14 08:18:21 AM
I think it's "No dog in this hunt."
 
2013-11-14 08:20:39 AM
My neighbor's kid's learning it right now.
Minding his p's and q's.
 
2013-11-14 08:21:46 AM

Goodluckfox: I think it's "No dog in this hunt."


Well, from your perspective as a fox, sure.
 
2013-11-14 08:22:50 AM
Well, not as concerned that they can write it, but they certainly need to know how to read it.
 
2013-11-14 08:23:14 AM
Writing?  By hand?  Hell, by the time you teach them to type, Apple's iMindLink will be out.
 
2013-11-14 08:24:28 AM
FTA: "The Constitution of the United States is written in cursive. Think about that," Bateman said.

THINK ABOUT THAT!!!

Also: Pew Pew Pew Research Center.
 
2013-11-14 08:24:50 AM
You can have my $60 calligraphy pen when you pry it from my cold dead hands.
 
2013-11-14 08:25:21 AM
My cursive is horrendous. I would submit that if the author of the article believes that makes me "illiterate", that not understanding the definition of a basic word - say, for the sake of argument, "illiterate" - is a better indication of illiteracy
 
2013-11-14 08:25:26 AM
Well, I know hell and damn, etc
 
2013-11-14 08:25:42 AM
The Constitution of the United States is written on 230 year old paper. Better start manufacturing a bunch of that.
 
2013-11-14 08:26:04 AM

Goodluckfox: I think it's "No dog in this hunt."


Original quote was from Michael Vick?
 
2013-11-14 08:26:16 AM

Goodluckfox: I think it's "No dog in this hunt."


The headline accurately follows the idiom I'm familiar with.
 
2013-11-14 08:27:47 AM

brimed03: FTA: "The Constitution of the United States is written in cursive. Think about that," Bateman said.

THINK ABOUT THAT!!!

Also: Pew Pew Pew Research Center.


Including those bits about people who only counted as 3/5th of a 'real' person when it came time for the white male property owners to vote
 
2013-11-14 08:28:29 AM
Offer it as an elective or something, it's not worth spending a lot of time on.
 
2013-11-14 08:29:23 AM

brimed03: FTA: "The Constitution of the United States is written in cursive. Think about that," Bateman said.

THINK ABOUT THAT!!!

Also: Pew Pew Pew Research Center.


It's also written on the hide of a dead sheep using the feather of a bird. Nothing about that is practical by today's standards. It's not as though most of us switch back and forth between keyboards and vellum on a regular basis.
 
2013-11-14 08:29:50 AM

stratagos: My cursive is horrendous.


My writing wedding thank-you cards last fall must have looked to the outside observer like a "learning to walk again" montage, complete with throwing the pen/cane across the room/hospital in dejected submission.
 
2013-11-14 08:29:58 AM
In years gone by, it helped distinguish the literate from the illiterate.
But now, in the digital age, people are increasingly communicating by computer and smartphone. No handwritten signature necessary.


lol wut is this dood evn saiyng?
 
2013-11-14 08:30:03 AM
I know hell, damn, bitc...

/Ever see a guy say goodbye to a shoe?
 
2013-11-14 08:30:06 AM
Cursive is dead people, deal with it. It was used primarily for formal letter writing. We have computers these days. Welcome to the 21st century.
 
2013-11-14 08:30:17 AM
Cursivists believe that capital letter 'Q' looks like numeral '2', and that lowercase 'z' looks like an eighth-note rest.

No thank you.
 
2013-11-14 08:30:58 AM

jshine: It's also written on the hide of a dead sheep using the feather of a bird.


Using the blood of Englishmen.
 
2013-11-14 08:31:01 AM

jshine: The headline accurately follows the idiom I'm familiar with.


Uh, oh wait, I had something good for this.

i1.ytimg.com
 
2013-11-14 08:31:25 AM

Sock Ruh Tease: lol wut is this dood evn saiyng?


IAWTwut
 
2013-11-14 08:32:05 AM
I'm sure my son will learn plenty of cursive in the playground.
 
2013-11-14 08:32:56 AM

vudukungfu: jshine: It's also written on the hide of a dead sheep using the feather of a bird.

Using the blood of Englishmen.


Many - in a sense...
 
2013-11-14 08:33:05 AM
I promptly forgot how to write cursive immediately upon leaving middle school and missed out on nothing because of it. I think that says all I need to know about it.

Besides, class time could be spent doing things much more important. Like lying to children about American History.
 
2013-11-14 08:33:08 AM

poot_rootbeer: Cursivists believe that capital letter 'Q' looks like numeral '2', and that lowercase 'z' looks like an eighth-note rest.


shirtshovel.com
 
2013-11-14 08:36:23 AM

Esroc: I promptly forgot how to write cursive immediately upon leaving middle school and missed out on nothing because of it. I think that says all I need to know about it.

Besides, class time could be spent doing things much more important. Like lying to children about American History.


Forget cursive and mandate typing classes. It's far more practical.

I'd rather spend time learning Latin than cursive. They're both dead, but Latin is more interesting and shows up more often.
 
2013-11-14 08:36:44 AM
"Modern research indicates that more areas of the human brain are engaged when children use cursive handwriting than when they keyboard," said Bateman, who handwrites 125 ornate letters each year.

HOW DO I KEYBORED?  DO I INNERNET?  HALP
 
2013-11-14 08:37:11 AM
 FTA: "The Constitution of the United States is written in cursive. Think about that," Bateman said.

And a number of other historically important documents are written in Greek, Latin, Italian, German, Chinese, Hebrew and and and....

Better free up some time by cancelling art and gym and make sure we've got all those bases covered as well....
 
2013-11-14 08:39:04 AM

kronicfeld: The Constitution of the United States is written on 230 year old paper. Better start manufacturing a bunch of that.


Well, the copy on display at the National Archives is actually written on parchment, not paper.
 
2013-11-14 08:40:39 AM
Alright kiddies, download one of these and print out your homework using one of these (that you built yourself of course).  Congratulations, you've just learned useful computer and engineering skills instead of outdated uselessness.
 
2013-11-14 08:42:21 AM
Well, how about that. It is more than a little awkward to watch high school graduates stumble through reading their own graduation cards which were written in cursive. Painful stuff.

/love my fountain pens
 
2013-11-14 08:42:31 AM
If you don't know cursive, then you can't have a signature, and you can't read other people's signatures either.
 
2013-11-14 08:42:33 AM
The real travesty is how few kids these days know how to ride a horse.  How can they ever hope to become a well-rounded citizen without the proper horsemanship skills?
 
2013-11-14 08:44:01 AM

SpdrJay: You can have my $60 calligraphy pen when you pry it from my cold dead hands.


Got to admit it's kind of an ornamental or artistic flourish, though.  That's not necessarily a bad thing, but most people's drawing, like most people's penmanship, even in the good ol' days, sucks.

Note: if I had written this by hand, it would be illegible as well as inane.
 
2013-11-14 08:46:11 AM

poot_rootbeer: Cursivists believe that capital letter 'Q' looks like numeral '2', and that lowercase 'z' looks like an eighth-note rest.

No thank you.


Strictly speaking, while the script taught as 'cursive' in most elementary schools is  a cursive script, it's not necessarily  the cursive script.  There are any number of styles of penmanship and lettering that are cursive, and many that aren't.

That said, even the broader set of cursive scripts don't really have that much historical relevance, they really only were dominant in a weird gap in the 1700s and 1600s where literacy was wide-spread enough that not everything written was important enough to be carefully written out with distinct letters and the dominant tools were cheap, easy-to-use-and-replace quills and reeds instead of the brushes and styluses used in "proper" writing.

As for the constitution, while it was written by hand while they were all in the room making notes, here's how it was distributed to the states and the people:

constitutioncenter.org
 
2013-11-14 08:46:58 AM

Rapmaster2000: The real travesty is how few kids these days know how to ride a horse.  How can they ever hope to become a well-rounded citizen without the proper horsemanship skills?


I doubt one in ten of them can perform a Viennese Waltz...
 
2013-11-14 08:52:03 AM
Okay... writing in cursive is pretty useless these days. It should be optional, and students should at least be able to read it, but writing in it is not really necessary anymore.

Also, the thing about the constitution being "written in cursive" is bullshiat. The style of cursive it was written in is very different from what we think of as cursive today. I'll bet that the guy who made that quote would have a hard time reading the original. Funny thing with old documents... they're often written in ways that are seen as quaint and antiquated by future generations, who have developed new methods. Ad yet, somehow, there's people who can read them just fine. I'm fluent in modern Greek and in German. But if I see something written in German from a few hundred years back, I can't make sense of it. Hell, a lot of Nazi propaganda was written in the old German writing style, and I have a lot of trouble reading that stuff, too.

My point: writing systems change. People figure out how to deal with historical documents in the meantime. Deal with it, constitution dude.
 
2013-11-14 08:52:15 AM

Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: Rapmaster2000: The real travesty is how few kids these days know how to ride a horse.  How can they ever hope to become a well-rounded citizen without the proper horsemanship skills?

I doubt one in ten of them can perform a Viennese Waltz...


Everyone please stop making me feel old by listing things I learned to do as a kid and implying they're a century out of date.

//Even if it's true.
//Also, waltzes were unpopular in the US in the 1700s/early 1800s, considered a bit scandalous due to the close contact of the dancers, so a Gavotte might be a more appropriate reference.
 
2013-11-14 08:52:47 AM
Because we don't have anything better to do with school time than to spend it on a centuries-obsolete script.
 
2013-11-14 08:54:32 AM

Jim_Callahan: As for the constitution, while it was written by hand while they were all in the room making notes, here's how it was distributed to the states and the people:


I wonder if this guy wants us to go back to typing 's' like 'f', too.  Prefident Wafhington agreef!
 
2013-11-14 08:57:51 AM

generallyso: Because we don't have anything better to do with school time than to spend it on a centuries-obsolete script.


But why bring the bible into schools?
 
2013-11-14 08:58:20 AM
Oh thank goodness.  More people to side with me in illegible signatures on checks.

"Sir, this looks like Frankie Milky Moo"

"Those aren't my first middle and last name"

"Then write them correctly"

"I did"
 
2013-11-14 08:58:51 AM

space1999: If you don't know cursive, then you can't have a signature, and you can't read other people's signatures either.


My signature is kind of a printed version of my name. Well, more of a print/cursive hybrid. Ok, that's not 100% accurate, either.

I'll be honest- at this point, it's really more of a sigil than anything.
 
2013-11-14 09:01:21 AM

LouDobbsAwaaaay: I wonder if this guy wants us to go back to typing 's' like 'f', too. Prefident Wafhington agreef!


None of you realized all this time that my username is actually "kronicseld."
 
2013-11-14 09:02:26 AM

Gonz: space1999: If you don't know cursive, then you can't have a signature, and you can't read other people's signatures either.

My signature is kind of a printed version of my name. Well, more of a print/cursive hybrid. Ok, that's not 100% accurate, either.

I'll be honest- at this point, it's really more of a sigil than anything.


That's really the point.  A bank scanner can match your signature against one on file very quickly and as long as you haven't developed Parkinson's in the meantime, the two should match on key points that are hard to fake.
 
2013-11-14 09:03:53 AM
 
2013-11-14 09:04:21 AM

LouDobbsAwaaaay: Jim_Callahan: As for the constitution, while it was written by hand while they were all in the room making notes, here's how it was distributed to the states and the people:

I wonder if this guy wants us to go back to typing 's' like 'f', too.  Prefident Wafhington agreef!


Capitalizing all Nouns should also be revived!
 
2013-11-14 09:06:58 AM
Someone wanted me to write something in cursive the other day, and I literally could not do it. The first word was "To", I set to writing the T and made a horrible looking cursive T, then couldn't figure out how to start the O. I gave up and just started printing. The ability to write cursive aside from my name (which is still "cursive" like the Sahara is still fertile land) has completely left me.
 
Displayed 50 of 102 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report