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(Daily Mail)   You buy free range chickens instead of cage raised? You monster, hurting those poor chickens, be humane, buy caged   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 57
    More: Interesting, british supermarkets, standard of living, Compassion in World Farming  
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9407 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Nov 2013 at 11:51 PM (22 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-13 08:10:18 PM
I only buy free range chickens of cage raised. Oh, trust me, it's not easily done but farmers worth their salt can do it
 
2013-11-13 09:20:31 PM
Which came first, the free-range chicken or the fact that the article is about the eggs that come from free-range chickens?
 
2013-11-13 09:30:22 PM
 
2013-11-13 10:39:45 PM
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-11-13 11:49:24 PM
I don't buy free range chickens, because I am lazy.  By the time I get to them all locomotion has completely removed.
 
2013-11-13 11:59:23 PM
deadhomersociety.files.wordpress.com
Easy there, young man, you'll only make yourself tired and stringy. Now, to check on the free range children.
 
2013-11-13 11:59:35 PM

Makh: I don't buy free range chickens, because I am lazy.  By the time I get to them all locomotion has completely removed.


Little Eva reportedly inconsolable.

Chickens deserve all the cruelty they get.  Evil little bastards, they are, with vicious tempers.  Roosters are the worst.  They'd like nothing more than to strut up and give your shins such a peckin'...
 
2013-11-14 12:06:51 AM
Free range in the US is supposedly different than free range in the UK

Supposedly, this counts

upload.wikimedia.org

As long as they have a door.
 
2013-11-14 12:16:11 AM
I don't care how my chicken nuggets or eggs were raised, I just want them to taste good. They're farking chickens for christ sake.
 
2013-11-14 12:18:14 AM
If you want your chickens raised 100% cruelty free, raise them yourself.

Otherwise, they won't be up to your exacting standards of pet-like care for a bird that's being raised to be slaughtered.
 
2013-11-14 12:23:10 AM
they make lousy house pets
 
2013-11-14 12:24:03 AM
If you really want to pretend you care about their feelings, how about NOT EATING THEM.
 
2013-11-14 12:24:46 AM
When a chicken is free, truly free, to roam and play unencumbered in the world, it becomes more than a chicken. It becomes synergistically linked to the earth and can express its full chicken-soul. And the eggs of these 'uber-chickens' make the omelettes far more tasty than those made with the eggs of the pedestrian cage-bound slave-chickens.
 
2013-11-14 12:26:29 AM

Gyrfalcon: If you want your chickens raised 100% cruelty free, raise them yourself.

Otherwise, they won't be up to your exacting standards of pet-like care for a bird that's being raised to be slaughtered.


This.

/don't need to be pet standards, but holy crap it should be better than what we've got now!
 
2013-11-14 12:26:48 AM

Gyrfalcon: If you want your chickens raised 100% cruelty free, raise them yourself.

Otherwise, they won't be up to your exacting standards of pet-like care for a bird that's being raised to be slaughtered.


I don't care about cruelty-free so much, but making sure we're raising them optimally.  For me, that means treating them well enough that they don't require preventative antibiotics or other drugs for normal life.

I don't like how the current system is either antibiotics-constantly or no-antibiotics.  We should treat our farm animals with antibiotics when they get sick, and possibly their nearby cage-mates.  However, for the most part, they should be well-treated enough to not require antibiotics.  It's the same with other drugs.  Generally, I'd like my animals raised without drugs; if the occasional needs drugs or simple culling, that's OK.

I also want the system to tell the truth.  Honestly, a crowded pen full of chickens with a door to a tiny pen outside counts as "free range"?  That isn't what consumers think it is.  It's false advertising, and it's a meaningless comparison to their old conditions.
 
2013-11-14 12:34:35 AM
Keep farking those chickens.
i.imgur.com
It's delicious.
 
2013-11-14 12:35:32 AM
Absolute, lunatic bullshiat written by the typical idiots at the Mail. If you believe this incredibly stupid claim, which relies on, "a study that isn't sourced, as per the typical terrible journalism that is the Mail," then just go work around both types. It's bizarre how people will even sink low enough to promote crap like this.
 
2013-11-14 12:42:09 AM
Farked up chickens; great music.

http://youtu.be/ZZEWczCdpLE
 
2013-11-14 12:54:03 AM

AgentPothead: If you really want to pretend you care about their feelings, how about NOT EATING THEM.


The egg's feelings?
 
2013-11-14 01:00:14 AM

Gyrfalcon: If you want your chickens raised 100% cruelty free, raise them yourself.


LERCAL FERM! posers are the best posers. Love watching them FERM! around here and getting a taste for what FERMing is all about the first go around and learning what a miracle industrialized agriculture is, not that they're sharp enough to get it.

//LERCAL FERM! stickers for all!
 
2013-11-14 01:10:15 AM
Thrruust! They need mor' thrrust!
 
2013-11-14 01:10:49 AM

Hector Remarkable: When a chicken is free, truly free, to roam and play unencumbered in the world, it becomes more than a chicken. It becomes synergistically linked to the earth and can express its full chicken-soul. And the eggs of these 'uber-chickens' make the omelettes far more tasty than those made with the eggs of the pedestrian cage-bound slave-chickens.


When a chicken is free, truly free it quickly becomes coyote food.
 
2013-11-14 01:31:53 AM
Actually now I'm expecting a great revelation huge trolling threadshiat that free range chickens are some stupid liberal fad and we're stupid for buying into it.

Anyone?
 
2013-11-14 01:32:09 AM
Wives kept in cages are much happier too.
 
2013-11-14 01:45:21 AM
I once had two pet chickens. They were suburban chickens. I guess you could say they were "free range" as they were confined to the backyard but we often heard from the neighbors that they would walk the fences and get in other peoples' yards.

One day they left and I never saw them again. My neighbor grilled that night...I'm still a bit suspicious.
 
2013-11-14 02:05:53 AM
A far as eggs go, if you're worried about ethics, just raise 2-3 chickens. You'll have more eggs than you'll know what to do with, and they really aren't all that much work. Of course I understand not everyone lives in a rural area (if you live in the city, you can probably just forget that whole thing), but I digress: if you have a yard, raising a few chickens for eggs is not challenging and can be quite rewarding knowing your eggs are clean, safe, disease free, and antibiotic free.
 
2013-11-14 02:08:21 AM

ReverendJimBobHammer: Hector Remarkable: When a chicken is free, truly free, to roam and play unencumbered in the world, it becomes more than a chicken. It becomes synergistically linked to the earth and can express its full chicken-soul. And the eggs of these 'uber-chickens' make the omelettes far more tasty than those made with the eggs of the pedestrian cage-bound slave-chickens.

When a chicken is free, truly free it quickly becomes coyote food.


Well, there's this.

Two friends of mine raised chickens in high school. They took very good care of their hens (they had about half a dozen between them), in an enclosed yard up the street from their homes. Good food, plenty of space, all that. Then one day a family of raccoons discovered the hen yard, and in about two weeks, they had zero chickens.

We lost all our ducks to owls in about the same span of time. Nature is free, but it isn't kind.
 
2013-11-14 02:10:03 AM
i1.ytimg.com
 
2013-11-14 02:15:57 AM

Ruiizu: A far as eggs go, if you're worried about ethics, just raise 2-3 chickens. You'll have more eggs than you'll know what to do with, and they really aren't all that much work. Of course I understand not everyone lives in a rural area (if you live in the city, you can probably just forget that whole thing), but I digress: if you have a yard, raising a few chickens for eggs is not challenging and can be quite rewarding knowing your eggs are clean, safe, disease free, and antibiotic free.


How would you know they're safe and "disease free"?
 
2013-11-14 02:22:37 AM
I buy eggs from a farm that has some pretty damned happy chickens hopping all over the yard. Jumbo eggs too.

When I was in university and still at home, I had two egg ducks and they provided all the eggs we could use.
 
2013-11-14 02:42:29 AM
Chickens are savage beasts. You gotta keep 'em separated.

/separate the whites from the yolks
 
2013-11-14 02:45:45 AM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Ruiizu: A far as eggs go, if you're worried about ethics, just raise 2-3 chickens. You'll have more eggs than you'll know what to do with, and they really aren't all that much work. Of course I understand not everyone lives in a rural area (if you live in the city, you can probably just forget that whole thing), but I digress: if you have a yard, raising a few chickens for eggs is not challenging and can be quite rewarding knowing your eggs are clean, safe, disease free, and antibiotic free.

How would you know they're safe and "disease free"?


That depends on how well the owner cares for that animal.

Also, for city, there is usually some sort of zoning. When I looked up the L.A. City ordinance, it said the coop has to be kept something like 35 ft from the primary residence, and 25 ft from all buildings. For our quarter-acre lot in the Valley, it meant we'd have to put it up against the back wall, but it wasn't what I'd call a prohibitive restriction.
 
2013-11-14 03:37:55 AM
Free range chickens and eggs  taste better. It's worth the extra. Cage birds are genetically different, bred to put on weight quickly, the the point that they can't support their own weight. No... just... no.
 
2013-11-14 03:47:45 AM
Do the chickens have large talons?
 
2013-11-14 03:55:43 AM

Hector Remarkable: When a chicken is free, truly free, to roam and play unencumbered in the world, it becomes more than a chicken. It becomes synergistically linked to the earth and can express its full chicken-soul. And the eggs of these 'uber-chickens' make the omelettes far more tasty than those made with the eggs of the pedestrian cage-bound slave-chickens.


Or, to restate in more earthly terms:  Free range chickens get to eat bugs and such, and this makes their eggs taste better.
 
2013-11-14 04:05:01 AM

Aestatis: Gyrfalcon: If you want your chickens raised 100% cruelty free, raise them yourself.

Otherwise, they won't be up to your exacting standards of pet-like care for a bird that's being raised to be slaughtered.

I don't care about cruelty-free so much, but making sure we're raising them optimally.  For me, that means treating them well enough that they don't require preventative antibiotics or other drugs for normal life.

I don't like how the current system is either antibiotics-constantly or no-antibiotics.  We should treat our farm animals with antibiotics when they get sick, and possibly their nearby cage-mates.  However, for the most part, they should be well-treated enough to not require antibiotics.  It's the same with other drugs.  Generally, I'd like my animals raised without drugs; if the occasional needs drugs or simple culling, that's OK.

I also want the system to tell the truth.  Honestly, a crowded pen full of chickens with a door to a tiny pen outside counts as "free range"?  That isn't what consumers think it is.  It's false advertising, and it's a meaningless comparison to their old conditions.


Agreed. There is enough empty land in this country that it's stupid the animals aren't given at least a bit more room per head. I was talking to my realtor guy about 'why I don't want to live close to a dairy farm' (by which I mean close enough to get constant smell; I don't care if it's like, down the road a ways), and he was under the mistaken impression that all dairy cows get to graze in pasture a good amount of their day. I was like uh... no. You should come see some of the ones near where I live. Not saying they never go out, but it's not frequent and some of these guys barely let them out of the barn at all.

Peki: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Ruiizu: A far as eggs go, if you're worried about ethics, just raise 2-3 chickens. You'll have more eggs than you'll know what to do with, and they really aren't all that much work. Of course I understand not everyone lives in a rural area (if you live in the city, you can probably just forget that whole thing), but I digress: if you have a yard, raising a few chickens for eggs is not challenging and can be quite rewarding knowing your eggs are clean, safe, disease free, and antibiotic free.

How would you know they're safe and "disease free"?

That depends on how well the owner cares for that animal.

Also, for city, there is usually some sort of zoning. When I looked up the L.A. City ordinance, it said the coop has to be kept something like 35 ft from the primary residence, and 25 ft from all buildings. For our quarter-acre lot in the Valley, it meant we'd have to put it up against the back wall, but it wasn't what I'd call a prohibitive restriction.


I'm kind of surprised LA allows them at all. I live in a village, just outside a tiny 'city', and about a stone's throw from a whole lot of empty space, and yet the village doesn't allow livestock at all. Probably because of potential noise from roosters or whatever, but I'd rather hear that than my four neighbors rumbling around on Harleys all spring/summer/fall.
 
2013-11-14 04:30:37 AM

Jesus McSordid: Free range chickens and eggs  taste better. It's worth the extra. Cage birds are genetically different, bred to put on weight quickly, the the point that they can't support their own weight. No... just... no.


Well you pay more for them (or put more effort into them), so they will taste better regardless of whether they are actually any different or not:

http://coutureauchocolat.com/do-drinks-and-food-taste-better-when-th ey re-more-expensive/

The real test would be if you could reliably tell the difference in a blind taste test, and generally it seems like people can't tell the difference, for example:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/08/what-are-the-best-eggs-cage-free- or ganic-omega-3s-grocery-store-brand-the-food-lab.html
 
2013-11-14 04:45:01 AM
xria - for a while when we lived with my in-laws, MIL had chickens, and my god were those eggs tasty compared to the store bought ones. She really didn't do anything special beyond feeding them, and they were allowed outside in warm weather, but we also fed them scraps from the kitchen so they probably had much better nutrition than your average chicken farm bird. You should have seen how excited they got if you threw a caterpillar or other bug in the pen.

/evil birds though
//almost had to kick one on occasion just so I could get in to feed them
 
2013-11-14 04:58:26 AM
Is't that like saying that prisoners have a better life because they don't have to deal with the stress of holding down a job or paying taxes?
 
2013-11-14 05:01:05 AM
Ladyfortuna,

LA doesn't consider them "livestock," that's how you get around the zoning laws. A lot of places have rules specifically for chickens, since it's not really the same as raising cattle or horses.

/the Valley up by where I live does have a lot of agricultural zoning due to the horse ranches and history. Not all of L.A. is downtown and Hollywood!
 
2013-11-14 05:17:39 AM
Well technically, I suppose my chances of being pecked or breaking a bone is greater when you let me out of a cage too.  For those of you with this 'They're JUST CHICKENS' bullshiat, go die in a fire you goddam subhumans.
 
2013-11-14 05:30:03 AM

Peki: Gyrfalcon: If you want your chickens raised 100% cruelty free, raise them yourself.

Otherwise, they won't be up to your exacting standards of pet-like care for a bird that's being raised to be slaughtered.

This.

/don't need to be pet standards, but holy crap it should be better than what we've got now!


I know of a number of people that raise them to eat or for eggs, and a couple that think they're pets. To each his/her own I guess. But yeah, I've seen people put coops in garages (to help with predators when living in the sticks) and people that convert tool shelves in sheds to nestings. Maybe 400 sq ft, but that always seemed enough for 10 hens and a rooster with outside pens too. But goddamit if those things make a ton of noise when something comes around at night. They're better than watch dogs. Foxes and coyotes gotta eat I suppose too. And then you have to make the pens predator-proof, which is damn difficult unless you want kill them all off......while living in the sticks.
 
2013-11-14 05:57:36 AM

Pinko_Commie: Is't that like saying that prisoners have a better life because they don't have to deal with the stress of holding down a job or paying taxes?


While I'm not one to try to say that attributing ANY emotion to animals is anthropomorphism, you're anthropomorphizing.  Chicken's anscestors split from human ancestors really, really far back in history.

While I'm not saying tiny cages are the best, chickens that are 'unsufficiently happy' tend to not lay as well.  They lay just fine in cages that meet certain requirements though.
 
2013-11-14 06:45:21 AM

xria: Jesus McSordid: Free range chickens and eggs  taste better. It's worth the extra. Cage birds are genetically different, bred to put on weight quickly, the the point that they can't support their own weight. No... just... no.

Well you pay more for them (or put more effort into them), so they will taste better regardless of whether they are actually any different or not:

http://coutureauchocolat.com/do-drinks-and-food-taste-better-when-th ey re-more-expensive/

The real test would be if you could reliably tell the difference in a blind taste test, and generally it seems like people can't tell the difference, for example:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/08/what-are-the-best-eggs-cage-free- or ganic-omega-3s-grocery-store-brand-the-food-lab.html


I've never participated in a blind taste test for eggs, but I cook with them on a regular basis. It's been years since I used cage eggs, but I remember that they were pale and unreliable. Since I switched to free range, I never waste an egg.

But the really big difference is in meat birds. Those are the ones that are genetically different, and they do nothing but sit in their own excrement and grow, so they can be slaughtered as early as possible. And, yeah, the difference is pretty stark.

But, you know what? Even if there was no discernible difference, I'd still pay the extra, because cage birds live in the seventh circle of hell, and then die young, and screw that.
 
2013-11-14 07:10:52 AM
Here's a great way to tell if your eggs come from chickens that have had a good quality of life: Go to the farm and visit the chickens.


/gets roasters and eggs from a farm just down the way
//Can you smell my smug from over here?  New TCP header extension makes it work!
 
2013-11-14 07:52:37 AM

Aestatis: Gyrfalcon: If you want your chickens raised 100% cruelty free, raise them yourself.

Otherwise, they won't be up to your exacting standards of pet-like care for a bird that's being raised to be slaughtered.

I don't care about cruelty-free so much, but making sure we're raising them optimally.  For me, that means treating them well enough that they don't require preventative antibiotics or other drugs for normal life.

I don't like how the current system is either antibiotics-constantly or no-antibiotics.  We should treat our farm animals with antibiotics when they get sick, and possibly their nearby cage-mates.  However, for the most part, they should be well-treated enough to not require antibiotics.  It's the same with other drugs.  Generally, I'd like my animals raised without drugs; if the occasional needs drugs or simple culling, that's OK.

I also want the system to tell the truth.  Honestly, a crowded pen full of chickens with a door to a tiny pen outside counts as "free range"?  That isn't what consumers think it is.  It's false advertising, and it's a meaningless comparison to their old conditions.


Most antibiotics are given to farm animals to increase their growth and weight gain, not because they're sick. The fact that it can prevent some illness is more of a side effect. In the last year or so the FDA has begun taking steps to decrease the amount of antibiotics used in livestock as growth promotion but I'm not sure how much difference it's made.
 
2013-11-14 08:08:55 AM
Our free range chickens have the life. They're out during the day (with access to the coop at all times) and in at night. The coop is a large converted shed and fenced run, large enough for everyone to spread out, with multiple nesting boxes (although in cold weather they all pig pile in one). They're never shut all the way inside unless the weather is dangerously cold. Also they start out life inside the house and are hand raised until they're old enough to be outside, so they're friendly like little dogs. We don't have roosters, though. Roosters suck.

I can't eat store bought eggs anymore. There's that much of a difference. They taste like blah nothing to me.
 
2013-11-14 08:18:32 AM
Anyone who has any ethical qualms about eating chicken should try raising them.  The start out as adorable little chicks, but they eventually become vile, vicious, cannibalistic, brutal animals who deserve to become food.

They are also very stupid; I honestly don't think they can tell the difference if they are living in a cage or a range.  And their behavior doesn't change much after you remove their heads.

Seriously: growing up in cities away from our food sources has led to people developing weird ideas about raising animals as food that I don't think they would have if they actually had a hand in raising those animals.  I'm glad I had the experience of living out in the country.

/grew up in the city, then in the country; parents raised chickens for years
//and turkeys and geese
///and pigs.  delicious pigs.
 
2013-11-14 08:26:43 AM

AgentPothead: If you really want to pretend you care about their feelings, how about NOT EATING THEM.


silly, they cant feel a thing when i eat them
 
2013-11-14 08:30:20 AM
Bull. My chickens are as happy as pigs in sh*t. The pigs, on the other hand... mmmm bacon.
 
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