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(Forbes)   Step aside credit score, your phone score is calling   (forbes.com) divider line 49
    More: Interesting, credit rating, phone numbers  
•       •       •

12219 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Nov 2013 at 6:36 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



49 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-11-13 06:27:11 PM  
Can we just get going with the subdermal tracking chip thing already and be done with it?
 
2013-11-13 06:30:39 PM  
*decline*
 
2013-11-13 06:38:23 PM  
Everyone in Manhattan with a 212 will biatch and moan that they didn't get grandfathered in with a perfect score.
 
2013-11-13 06:43:37 PM  
Yeah, no.........I am about to get rid of my flip phone, got rid of that "smart" phone 4 years ago and might have a land line but will probably go with no phone.  WRITE A LETTER!
 
2013-11-13 06:49:11 PM  
"Eventually the mobile phone as authenticator of identity will be everywhere, because it's immediately verifiable. You'll have to provide your phone number for every site."

Sure...  867-5309.
 
2013-11-13 06:52:31 PM  
"Telesign helps companies verify that a mobile number belongs to a user (sending those oh-so-familiar "verify that you received this code" texts) "

Whoever has the number 123-456-7890... im sorry for all the texts you've gotten.

I'd also like to apologize to whoever lives at 123 Road Street, Anywhere USA.
 
2013-11-13 06:54:19 PM  

buckeyebrain: "Eventually the mobile phone as authenticator of identity will be everywhere, because it's immediately verifiable. You'll have to provide your phone number for every site."

Sure...  867-5309.


Call? On the phone? That's like, going to a brick-and-mortar store, who the hell under 60 does that?
 
2013-11-13 06:55:24 PM  
This implies that a mobile number is somehow more secure than anything else.

Laugh out loud.
 
2013-11-13 06:55:24 PM  
I yes, gatekeeping with a hint of extortion thrown in.

You want to make calls to other companies for services.. pay us a fee of our clients (which is everybody) will block you from calling them.
 
2013-11-13 06:56:16 PM  
FTA:  "A lot of the data comes from Telesign's proprietary network data," says Jillings. "We see very interesting traffic patterns in our closed network of clients."

Hey guys, send me a check and I'll give you your Fark score.  I calculate it using proprietary data, so I am the only one that can provide this score for you.

Hey Drew, send me a check and I'll give you the names of a bunch of Farkers with excellent Fark scores.  I calculate this score using proprietary data, so no one else can provide this score to you.
 
2013-11-13 07:03:33 PM  

chewd: "Telesign helps companies verify that a mobile number belongs to a user (sending those oh-so-familiar "verify that you received this code" texts) "

Whoever has the number 123-456-7890... im sorry for all the texts you've gotten.

I'd also like to apologize to whoever lives at 123 Road Street, Anywhere USA.


lol

maybe I should apologize to whoever owns no[nospam-﹫-backwards]s­kna­ht*com sorry about all that spam
 
2013-11-13 07:04:26 PM  
Telesign sees phone numbers as a replacement for social security numbers - a form of identification that can be instantly verified

So muggers will now be classified as Identity thieves when they jack your phone?
 
2013-11-13 07:05:02 PM  

RogermcAllen: FTA:  "A lot of the data comes from Telesign's proprietary network data," says Jillings. "We see very interesting traffic patterns in our closed network of clients."

Hey guys, send me a check and I'll give you your Fark score.  I calculate it using proprietary data, so I am the only one that can provide this score for you.

Hey Drew, send me a check and I'll give you the names of a bunch of Farkers with excellent Fark scores.  I calculate this score using proprietary data, so no one else can provide this score to you.


The Fark score is too easy to scam to be of any use.  The TotalFark score which only I can provide would be much more useful to you, Drew, and I can provide it for any TotalFarker for only $5 a month.

Now, if you want to step up to the UltraFark sc +++>>>.>...... CARRIER LOST
 
2013-11-13 07:06:43 PM  

Majick Thise: chewd: "Telesign helps companies verify that a mobile number belongs to a user (sending those oh-so-familiar "verify that you received this code" texts) "

Whoever has the number 123-456-7890... im sorry for all the texts you've gotten.

I'd also like to apologize to whoever lives at 123 Road Street, Anywhere USA.

lol

maybe I should apologize to whoever owns no[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]sknaht[* image 7x13]com sorry about all that spam


Actually, the more interesting thing to do is to give out real data but with a few subtle changes, so you can track who sells their lists to someone else.

For a while, every magazine subscription and warranty card had a different middle name.  Franco A File was The Economist, Franco B File was Foreign Affairs, Franco C File bought a Kitchenaid mixer, etc.
 
2013-11-13 07:06:52 PM  

Majick Thise: chewd: "Telesign helps companies verify that a mobile number belongs to a user (sending those oh-so-familiar "verify that you received this code" texts) "

Whoever has the number 123-456-7890... im sorry for all the texts you've gotten.

I'd also like to apologize to whoever lives at 123 Road Street, Anywhere USA.

lol

maybe I should apologize to whoever owns no[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]sknaht[* image 7x13]com sorry about all that spam


If you want to create a bogus email address, have it end in "[nospam-﹫-backwards]elpm­ax­e­*co­m" This is the 555- number of the internet, designed for allowing student examples in textbooks without risking the code spamming a real address.
 
2013-11-13 07:08:51 PM  
I just use m­e­t­clu­b[nospam-﹫-backwards]l­oa*c­o­m because fark those guys.
 
2013-11-13 07:10:41 PM  
 
2013-11-13 07:10:50 PM  

FrancoFile: Actually, the more interesting thing to do is to give out real data but with a few subtle changes, so you can track who sells their lists to someone else.


Funny, today I got mail addressed do Admiral Kimwim. I don't remember filling anything like that, but I'm not surprised that I would do that.

And the White House gets lots of calls asking for me. 202 456 1111.

/should I not do that?
 
2013-11-13 07:14:39 PM  

buckeyebrain: "Eventually the mobile phone as authenticator of identity will be everywhere, because it's immediately verifiable. You'll have to provide your phone number for every site."

Sure...  867-5309.


I love that number.  Use it frequently when I need to buy something with a Walgreens discount, or fill up with Gas at a Kroger (3¢ off per gallon if you have a Kroger card).. I just punch that number into the pump, or give it to the Walgreens guy, and get my discount.

I bet if someone does (legitimately) own that number, they must be signed up for stuff at thousands of stores..

Majick Thise: maybe I should apologize to whoever owns no[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]sknaht[* image 7x13]com sorry about all that spam


I always use no­ne­of­your­[nospam-﹫-backwards]ssen­isub*com :-)
 
2013-11-13 07:16:48 PM  
my spam goes to Yugo­sc­re­w­y­a­s­el­f[nospam-﹫-backwards]emtae*co­m


Sorry for the inconvenience Yugo
 
2013-11-13 07:17:11 PM  
Apparently, someone doesn't know that if you 'know a guy' you can get a cloned number for less than $100.

/slightly more if you need a go-between
//so I hear
///allegedly
 
2013-11-13 07:23:05 PM  
Oh USA, where people can tell your telephone brand from your telephone number.
 
2013-11-13 07:25:27 PM  

Southern100: buckeyebrain: "Eventually the mobile phone as authenticator of identity will be everywhere, because it's immediately verifiable. You'll have to provide your phone number for every site."

Sure...  867-5309.

I love that number.  Use it frequently when I need to buy something with a Walgreens discount, or fill up with Gas at a Kroger (3¢ off per gallon if you have a Kroger card).. I just punch that number into the pump, or give it to the Walgreens guy, and get my discount.

I bet if someone does (legitimately) own that number, they must be signed up for stuff at thousands of stores..

Majick Thise: maybe I should apologize to whoever owns no[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]sknaht[* image 7x13]com sorry about all that spam

I always use noneofyour[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]ssenisub[* image 7x13]com :-)


jaso­nv[nospam-﹫-backwards]31­f*c­o­m is mine
 
2013-11-13 07:27:02 PM  
I'd like too see how my mobile number compares with my Google Voice number.

My cell is for serious stuff, my Google can be changed easily, with no real loss to me if I so desire.
 
2013-11-13 07:39:01 PM  
Yet another way to measure the capacity and willingness of any given person to endure soft robbery.
 
2013-11-13 07:39:56 PM  
with 0 being a gold iPhone and 1000 being a burner phone that's only used to order drugs and kill people.

Kill people with it? Who am I, Naomi Campbell?
 
2013-11-13 07:41:06 PM  

Majick Thise: chewd: "Telesign helps companies verify that a mobile number belongs to a user (sending those oh-so-familiar "verify that you received this code" texts) "

Whoever has the number 123-456-7890... im sorry for all the texts you've gotten.

I'd also like to apologize to whoever lives at 123 Road Street, Anywhere USA.

lol

maybe I should apologize to whoever owns no[[nospam-﹫-backwards] image 7x13]sknaht[* image 7x13]com sorry about all that spam


I feel bad for the poor Norwegian who has n­o[nospam-﹫-backwards]on*no. I have been using that for over a decade.
 
2013-11-13 07:41:51 PM  
As someone with an AT&T number that's coming up on 10 years, I'm not really caring if I get a kick out of these replies.

Honestly, it's just another means to discriminate against people.
 
2013-11-13 07:42:17 PM  
The way numbers get recycled I can't see this going over well. I already got calls from a collection agency looking for some woman I never heard of for around a year. Tried telling them I wasn't her, then ignored them yet they kept calling.
 
2013-11-13 07:45:01 PM  

James10952001: The way numbers get recycled I can't see this going over well. I already got calls from a collection agency looking for some woman I never heard of for around a year. Tried telling them I wasn't her, then ignored them yet they kept calling.


I got some of those at my desk phone at IBM. I started keeping a log of the calls and using that to inform them that I had no idea who this dude was and no one who worked there knew, either.
 
2013-11-13 07:49:04 PM  

RogermcAllen: FTA:  "A lot of the data comes from Telesign's proprietary network data," says Jillings. "We see very interesting traffic patterns in our closed network of clients."

Hey guys, send me a check and I'll give you your Fark score.  I calculate it using proprietary data, so I am the only one that can provide this score for you.

Hey Drew, send me a check and I'll give you the names of a bunch of Farkers with excellent Fark scores.  I calculate this score using proprietary data, so no one else can provide this score to you.


I WANT TO BE MR POPULAR! Do you take Visa?
 
2013-11-13 07:55:08 PM  

James10952001: The way numbers get recycled I can't see this going over well. I already got calls from a collection agency looking for some woman I never heard of for around a year. Tried telling them I wasn't her, then ignored them yet they kept calling.


DigitalCoffee: Apparently, someone doesn't know that if you 'know a guy' you can get a cloned number for less than $100.

/slightly more if you need a go-between
//so I hear
///allegedly


vodka: This implies that a mobile number is somehow more secure than anything else.

Laugh out loud.



You can tell who in this thread didn't read the article, or at the very least, didn't comprehend it.
 
2013-11-13 08:20:52 PM  

netweavr: Telesign sees phone numbers as a replacement for social security numbers - a form of identification that can be instantly verified

So muggers will now be classified as Identity thieves when they jack your phone?


only if its an iphone.
 
2013-11-13 08:37:55 PM  
I was about to get outraged and then I reconsidered.

We brought this on ourselves.

When we entered the computer age, we opened the door to a host of criminal activities we had never even thought of along with abuses even Gene Roddenberry could not have imagined. In two decades we had to create and pass a dozen or more laws dealing strictly with electronic abuse and new abuses are being dreamed up even before the ink is dry on the papers.

The Internet popped up and one of the very first things on it was the Anarchists' Cookbook, happily telling every hormonal teen and curious kid how to make pipe bombs -- and they did. Following that came a host of other such 'self defense' sites.

Now, we have a guy who has been able to make a machinegun off a 3D printer that shoots and he's working to make it even better and more durable and giving the plans out on the Internet because he feels that's 'right'. Yes, he has copied the lower register.

Porn exploded to levels beyond anything I could imagine. Shortly after, came the jump in sex crimes, followed by the hastily slapped together sex and pedophile laws. The FBI started monitoring the Internet, supposedly to catch pervs, then terrorists and the NSA, well, basically because they can.

Within the first two years, some smart arsed kid wrote and released a virus onto the net. Now they swarm out there like a plague, especially since folks found out how to make money off them. Spam also. We have laws concerning spammers, but no one ever goes after the companies who pay for their services.

That created a flourishing cottage industry of Security Programs designed to protect your system from viruses, malware and spam. Even so, none of them are perfect, have to be forever updated and buggers are always finding ways around them.

Now, introduce the cellphones. It didn't take long for crooks to cash in on them. Hackers went into overtime trying to find ways to tap into your calls and steal whatever they could, especially when your phone became Internet friendly and all sorts of (paid) aps became available.

One of the first things to show up was a device poked into your ATM that read your card and password, then transmitted it to a guy across the street. Once the phones got video function, society changed because you could be on camera at almost any time. Actually, if you got hurt and needed help, 75 people might show up, with 74 filming your agony and 1 calling 911. When rescue showed up, 64 would closely film the techs -- just in case.

Then kids discovered the video function and not only recorded everything, but posted it to the web -- including their own abject stupidity.

Along came disposable phones. That opened up an entirely new area previously unknown to criminals.

As a side note, the gold in your phones became valuable and a small side industry opened up scrapping them, then stripping the gold out. That opened the door for more metals for recyclers and more problems for the EPA as the chemicals needed are not the type you dump down the toilet.

Within 20 years, your bank accounts, social security numbers and very privacy were all at risk. Thieves made billions! Cellphone companies had to install locks on the phones because if you lost your $700 dream, more than likely the finder would keep and use it. Then they had to install trackers and GPS -- so you could find your phone and your wandering kid attached to it, or tack down the thief who filched it. Or track you down for whatever nefarious, quasi-legal reason 'they' had.

Texting made cellphone companies billions when it first came out. It also exposed a curious psychiatric oddity about most folks; they'd rather text than talk. The bandwidth for texting was less than voice or video, yet you got charged much more for it, because, well, they could.

Toss similar technologies into cars, like On-Star. Then GPS. Baby monitors with audio and visual popped up cheaply, wireless also, meaning anyone with the right gear could sit down the road from your home and not only peep in on the kid, but talk to him. Yes. This has happened.

Toss in wireless security cameras and again folks could sit outside your home and see what's going on so long as you turned on the security system. TV programs told you all how to do it.

Then came Wii and even more opportunities to steal popped up.

People stopped sending so many physical letters and used e-mail, copies of which they kept on their devices, along with text messages and voice mail, which not only criminals but law enforcement have delighted in discovering.

Need I mention sexting. Great for teens. Gray hair and embarrassment for the parents. It also disclosed how remarkably stupid some of our revered politicians are -- and crude.

Cheating via web enabled cell phones in school became a civil rights battle, helped create the helicopter parents and prompted the creation of new laws.

Advertising made sure almost EVERYONE had to have a cell phone.

Texting while driving accidents began to equal the numbers caused by drunks behind the wheel. Over worked cops now have to pull you over if they spot you texting while driving. They have their own problems, because not only can crooks now warn each other easily via cell phone when they're coming, but anyone passing by a cop stopping someone can also stop and video him and if he gets pi$$ed, you just know it's going on the web within minutes.

This technology means also that if you're in your home, having a bit of fun with your wife, windows open, but knowing no one can see in because of the dimness, well that video camera on the cell can. From across the street.

Plus, the technology has gotten cheap enough for people to buy night vision cameras. So your favorite parking spot in the romantic night might actually have a 'thousand eyes' trained on you, most of which will promptly post it on the net.

Your phone plan charges by the minute -- incoming or outgoing calls. Naturally, within a year of becoming popular, somehow call centers obtained your unlisted cell numbers and started calling with sales spiels -- which, even if turned off, went to voice mail. So you got charged.

Your private data became valuable to many genuine, law abiding businesses, working hard to sell you crap you don't need or want.

Cells became status symbols, meaning the more they could do, the more they cost. Also, much of your data is now on 'the cloud'. We don't have HD's holding gigabytes of data small enough to fit in that tiny cell or tablet.

How long before someone cracks the cloud? How long before governments find ways to authorize investigating your stuff held securely in the cloud?

It didn't take them very long to crash through the privacy laws surrounding ISPs to raid your 'secret' files. Sales in portable drives jumped.

Electronic espionage just flourished. Not just between nations, but between companies. Video camera's became smaller and smaller until they'd fit in pens in your pocket. Remember the pocket copier that could be used to copy paper documents? Now your phone will do the job even better. Plus, you don't need a special paper roll.

So, we did it all to ourselves. This is what Star Trek folks mean when they say giving advanced technology to a race not ready for it is a bad thing. They'll promptly muck it up.

I mean, businesses are now checking your Facebook pages to determine if you're good enough to hire. They also check to see if you slander them in your off time. Cops love both Facebook and Youtube. It makes finding criminals a lot easier.

Just think, some day you might not get a job you're fully qualified for because you don't own the latest tablet or don't care about Facebook.

In the meantime, your teen son or daughter is sexting someone, and are liable to wind up on the web.

Gets a bit complicated, doesn't it?
 
2013-11-13 08:48:22 PM  
I just use my ex-wife's or the guy she ran off with for my disposable e-mail or phone number.
 
2013-11-13 08:51:14 PM  

corinthian66: I just use my ex-wife's or the guy she ran off with for my disposable e-mail or phone number.

 I have also added them to some pretty interesting e-mail list.
 
2013-11-13 09:03:59 PM  

Rik01: I was about to get outraged and then I reconsidered.

We brought this on ourselves.

When we entered the computer age, [words words words]...


img27.imageshack.us
 
2013-11-13 09:26:26 PM  
My apologies:

To the owner of f♥c­k­y­ou[nospam-﹫-backwards]emtae*com, sorry for all the spam.
To the owner of 810-666-6666, I'm sorry for the calls you must have gotten.
To the owner of 517-800-8135, I'm sorry for the naughty calls you must have gotten.
To the owner of fa­ce­bo­ok­sucks[nospam-﹫-backwards]ooha­y­*c­om, I'm sure a couple of your spam emails are my fault.
To the owner of 555 Road St., F♥ckyoutown, CA, I'm sorry; Both for the mail you got because of me, and for your town's name.
 
2013-11-13 09:27:09 PM  

James10952001: The way numbers get recycled I can't see this going over well. I already got calls from a collection agency looking for some woman I never heard of for around a year. Tried telling them I wasn't her, then ignored them yet they kept calling.


That's exactly what someone who was covering for her would say!
 
2013-11-13 09:29:39 PM  

Rik01: I was about to get outraged and then I reconsidered.

We brought this on ourselves.

When we entered the computer age, we opened the door to a host of criminal activities we had never even thought of along with abuses even Gene Roddenberry could not have imagined. In two decades we had to create and pass a dozen or more laws dealing strictly with electronic abuse and new abuses are being dreamed up even before the ink is dry on the papers.

The Internet popped up and one of the very first things on it was the Anarchists' Cookbook, happily telling every hormonal teen and curious kid how to make pipe bombs -- and they did. Following that came a host of other such 'self defense' sites.
---
Gets a bit complicated, doesn't it?

 
I don't even own a computer and I've never even been  on the Internet.

 
2013-11-13 10:07:03 PM  

TheDirtyNacho: You can tell who in this thread didn't read the article, or at the very least, didn't comprehend it.


I know, right?
 
2013-11-13 11:10:25 PM  
Go to Hell, you privacy destroying, number crunching, MBA, dollar whore monkeys.

But I repeat myself.
 
2013-11-14 12:34:03 AM  
sending those oh-so-familiar "verify that you received this code" texts

Okay, am I the weird one or is the author of the article, because I've ever gotten one of those.

I think 2-factor authentication is a great idea, but not for phone calls.  I just don't answer my phone.  As the late great Joe Walsh once said "just leave a message, maybe I'll call".

Unfortunately things like applying for credit cards or loans don't require 2-factor authentication as many identity thieves and their victims will tell you and now they're doing it for simple phone calls?

/only skimmed the article
 
2013-11-14 12:35:20 AM  
My phone number is extremely easy to punch in. For some reason the local Lowes people keep typing in into their system (I'm guessing for people who decline to give one or something).

So I have hundreds upon hundreds upon hundreds of entries in their data base.

// Still haven't managed to get a discount because I'm such a good customer. Look I bought 17 stoves just last week even....
 
2013-11-14 12:49:47 AM  
I'm very proud to pretty much not exist to these kind of people. I don't have a cell phone of any type, I only have
a land line that is unlisted and only a very few people and businesses have my correct number. I almost always give my
fake number to any place that demands a number.  I keep one e-mail address for business stuff, and one for
family stuff.The two do not cross reference each other.I don't use Facebook,Twitter or any other web sites like it.
If I get a sales/beg call on my land-line I am often very rude and abusive to whomever it is and demand they never call the number again.  But I have toyed with some places, acting interested and so forth and having them call back and then  just hanging up or feigning problems or whatever until they realize that is what I'm doing, and they never call again. I have been known to use high pitch whistles, or force my modem to "answer" during the call or other such stuff
to "interrupt" my interest in whatever is they are trying to push until they give up and don't call back.
 
2013-11-14 01:40:42 AM  

Gonz: I'd like too see how my mobile number compares with my Google Voice number.

My cell is for serious stuff, my Google can be changed easily, with no real loss to me if I so desire.


Everything goes to my Google Voice number.  EVERYTHING.  Incoming and outgoing.  NO EXCEPTIONS.  It's just retarded to not have all the extra features Google Voice brings to the table.  Customizable outgoing voicemail messages by call group?  Not a problem.  The only people who have my phone's actual number instead of Google Voice are folks trying to get ahold of whoever had that number before I did.  So if the name doesn't pop up from my phone recognizing the number (and with a phone book with ~1000 people, many of which have more than one phone number because they haven't discovered Google Voice yet), I don't answer it.  If I don't later see it in my Google Voice log, then in to the Cyanogenmod black list it goes.  And since I just turned off voicemail on the cellphone's line completely and didn't have the Google Voice app forward it to my GV number when there's no answer to calls going directly to the phone instead of GV, whoever called gets an error message saying the party they're calling is not answering right after I hit END.  And Google Voice has some pretty nice spam controls, too.  And voicemail speech to text.

The degree of control Google Voice has given me with dealing with the phone is such that I actually don't mind d
 
2013-11-14 01:45:15 AM  

Baloo Uriza: The degree of control Google Voice has given me with dealing with the phone is such that I actually don't mind dealing with phone calls anymore.  I've automated most of it so just the important shiat like, but not necessarily limited to, key clients, friends and family can ring the bell for immediate interruption.

 
2013-11-14 02:22:26 AM  
What benefit is this to society other than to intel agencies?  WTF.
 
2013-11-14 02:24:50 AM  

Baloo Uriza: Gonz: I'd like too see how my mobile number compares with my Google Voice number.

My cell is for serious stuff, my Google can be changed easily, with no real loss to me if I so desire.

Everything goes to my Google Voice number.  EVERYTHING.  Incoming and outgoing.  NO EXCEPTIONS.  It's just retarded to not have all the extra features Google Voice brings to the table.  Customizable outgoing voicemail messages by call group?  Not a problem.  The only people who have my phone's actual number instead of Google Voice are folks trying to get ahold of whoever had that number before I did.  So if the name doesn't pop up from my phone recognizing the number (and with a phone book with ~1000 people, many of which have more than one phone number because they haven't discovered Google Voice yet), I don't answer it.  If I don't later see it in my Google Voice log, then in to the Cyanogenmod black list it goes.  And since I just turned off voicemail on the cellphone's line completely and didn't have the Google Voice app forward it to my GV number when there's no answer to calls going directly to the phone instead of GV, whoever called gets an error message saying the party they're calling is not answering right after I hit END.  And Google Voice has some pretty nice spam controls, too.  And voicemail speech to text.

The degree of control Google Voice has given me with dealing with the phone is such that I actually don't mind d


I'm the same way. I don't even know my cell phone number. As I was with Cricket for a number of years,  every time I bought a new phone (which was probably every 6 months or so), I'd just get a new number. I  wouldn't mess with porting the old one - since everything goes to my GrandCentral/GV number anyway.
 
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