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(The Week)   Why is pain expressed differently in different languages?   (theweek.com) divider line 25
    More: Interesting, Good Question, Adobe After Effects  
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2259 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Nov 2013 at 8:49 AM (39 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



25 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-11-13 08:56:05 AM
Ootch!i1365.photobucket.com
 
2013-11-13 09:08:17 AM
"Quick! Extra boiling oil!"
 
2013-11-13 09:30:28 AM
this explains why foreign adult movies suck
 
2013-11-13 10:09:09 AM
An actual, interesting, article without the usual click bait shenanigans... you're slipping Fark.
 
2013-11-13 10:20:54 AM
Lots of stuff is expressed differently in different languages.  I live in France...they've got a different word for, like, everything

/except 'croissant'
 
2013-11-13 10:25:45 AM
I'm pretty sure "YEEEEEAAAAARRRRGH" translates the same in every language.
 
2013-11-13 10:48:41 AM
No mention of Japanese?
 
2013-11-13 10:52:09 AM
The reaction to this

media.theweek.com

is pretty much the same in any language:

cx500forum.com
 
2013-11-13 10:55:58 AM
Because those vocalizations meant to express feelings of pain are learned social constructs. They don't just differ between languages but within them as well, the same way some people call it soda and others, pop. Babies don't do them. They just cry, the same in any language. My cousins somehow picked up that extreme pain can only be express by screaming "Owie zowie zoomba!" over and over at the top of your lungs. This comes in handy if your brother snaps you with a rubber band.
 
2013-11-13 11:17:10 AM
I dunno about you guys, but when I get hurt-like banging my finger with a hammer or something, all I say is "farkfark fark fark fark fark fark farkity fark fark farking fark "
 
2013-11-13 11:37:19 AM
Q: How bad does it hurt?

A: Somewhere between a son-of-biatch and a motherfarker.
 
2013-11-13 11:41:17 AM

Millennium: No mention of Japanese?


Atatatata itai!
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-11-13 02:15:51 PM
The list of European languages with similar bang/boom/pop/pow sounds to English is not impressive. English is derived from European languages (early German plus late Latin). Similarities in non-European languages do much more to support a theory of universal linguistic traits.
 
2013-11-13 02:22:27 PM
2.media.collegehumor.cvcdn.com

European See 'n Say: The cow goes "SHAZOO!"
Stewie Griffin: It most certainly does not!
 
2013-11-13 02:24:56 PM

ZAZ: The list of European languages with similar bang/boom/pop/pow sounds to English is not impressive. English is derived from European languages (early German plus late Latin).


And French.   Stephen Fry had an awesome BBC radio documentary about that in August, and another on the history and use of "fakr".  Sadly they were only available at the time for a week each episode.  But I believe the BBC packages them later (archived yet?  Need to find out, I know...).
 
2013-11-13 04:17:24 PM
I read an interesting article abstract yesterday about the word "huh".  Apparently this word appears in almost every language, with almost identical pronunciation, as a way of prompting someone to repeat themselves.
 
2013-11-13 04:47:52 PM

CreamFilling: Because those vocalizations meant to express feelings of pain are learned social constructs. They don't just differ between languages but within them as well, the same way some people call it soda and others, pop. Babies don't do them. They just cry, the same in any language. My cousins somehow picked up that extreme pain can only be express by screaming "Owie zowie zoomba!" over and over at the top of your lungs. This comes in handy if your brother snaps you with a rubber band.


Hence why, despite speaking English, there's a difference between someone in Status Hispanicus and someone else in TachyLordia with junctional Jesuses (lordy-lordy-lordy-lordy-lordy-lordy-lordy-lordy-JESUS-lordy-lordy-lor dy-lordy-lordy-lordy-lordy-lordy)
 
2013-11-13 04:58:03 PM

JPINFV: CreamFilling: Because those vocalizations meant to express feelings of pain are learned social constructs. They don't just differ between languages but within them as well, the same way some people call it soda and others, pop. Babies don't do them. They just cry, the same in any language. My cousins somehow picked up that extreme pain can only be express by screaming "Owie zowie zoomba!" over and over at the top of your lungs. This comes in handy if your brother snaps you with a rubber band.

Hence why, despite speaking English, there's a difference between someone in Status Hispanicus and someone else in TachyLordia with junctional Jesuses (lordy-lordy-lordy-lordy-lordy-lordy-lordy-lordy-JESUS-lordy-lordy-lor dy-lordy-lordy-lordy-lordy-lordy)


We always referred Status Hispanicus as episodic ADM (often with generalized incompetence).

"¡Ay Dios Mio! ¡No puedo, no puedo, no puedo!"
 
2013-11-13 05:15:40 PM
Odd. The word I use when I experience sudden pain begins with a consonant.
 
2013-11-13 06:03:45 PM
larrybrownsports.com
apparently what they say in Korea.......^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
 
2013-11-13 07:47:06 PM
Ni ... Peng ... Neeee wom!
 
2013-11-13 09:37:00 PM

SirTanon: [larrybrownsports.com image 540x332]
apparently what they say in Korea.......^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


Came for this! Thank you.

I read an article a little while ago saying that people sneeze in different languages as well.
 
2013-11-14 03:56:19 AM

jxb465: [2.media.collegehumor.cvcdn.com image 640x360]

European See 'n Say: The cow goes "SHAZOO!"
Stewie Griffin: It most certainly does not!


...but what does the fox say?
 
2013-11-14 07:42:54 AM
In other news, different languages use different words for stuff.
 
2013-11-14 08:47:01 AM

offmymeds: The reaction to this



is pretty much the same in any language:


Unfortunately, how we express laughter is not universal.
Je je je.
Ki ki ki.

Many cultures would not get ha ha
 
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