If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Salon)   'Dear Mr. Watterson" is a go. Fire up the transmogrifier and strap Captain T-Rex into his F-14. We are approved to buzz the tower of our youth   (salon.com) divider line 87
    More: Spiffy, Charles Schulz, direct reference, Krazy Kat, Huckleberry Finn, Middle America, plush toys, J.D. Salinger, Capt  
•       •       •

11512 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Nov 2013 at 6:15 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



87 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-11-12 10:16:47 PM  
When the Plain Dealer asked him about the Postal Service's "Calvin and Hobbes" stamp, Watterson said he planned to use it immediately: "I'm going to get in my horse and buggy and snail-mail a check for my newspaper subscription."

What's his Fark handle?? heh...
 
433 [TotalFark]
2013-11-13 12:37:23 AM  
One of my favorite strips is the cubist strip, over two panels, a chest of drawers goes from normal to cubist-kinked, and in the second pane, after becoming a cubists' rendition of a chest of drawers, says "Ahhhh."
 
2013-11-13 01:46:47 AM  
i1309.photobucket.com

Probably the greatest gift I've ever received, my parents bought it for me last Christmas. I adore it.
 
2013-11-13 02:23:15 AM  

TinyFist: [i1309.photobucket.com image 600x576]

Probably the greatest gift I've ever received, my parents bought it for me last Christmas. I adore it.


Mine sits on a shelf. Unopened. 
Might be time to dust it off and reread them all.
 
2013-11-13 02:24:30 AM  
rymimg.com
my all time favorite
 
2013-11-13 02:30:08 AM  
That strip was Bill Watterson's "Calvin and Hobbes," and it occurred to me while watching Joel Allan Schroeder's slight but agreeable documentary "Dear Mr. Watterson" that I've never heard anyone explore the question of why these two beloved characters are named after such forbidding figures in the history of British moral and political philosophy.

I think O'Heir is just showing his ignorance, plenty of people have tried to explore the question, and Watterson addressed it in his anthology.
 
2013-11-13 02:30:44 AM  

namatad: TinyFist: [i1309.photobucket.com image 600x576]

Probably the greatest gift I've ever received, my parents bought it for me last Christmas. I adore it.

Mine sits on a shelf. Unopened. 
Might be time to dust it off and reread them all.


I bought three when they came out.  I gave one away, I have one for reading, and one still in plastic.
 
2013-11-13 02:40:36 AM  

Lsherm: namatad: TinyFist: [i1309.photobucket.com image 600x576]

Probably the greatest gift I've ever received, my parents bought it for me last Christmas. I adore it.

Mine sits on a shelf. Unopened. 
Might be time to dust it off and reread them all.

I bought three when they came out.  I gave one away, I have one for reading, and one still in plastic.


Ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
so maybe I should just buy another .... or read the old paperbacks ...
 
2013-11-13 02:43:02 AM  

namatad: Lsherm: namatad: TinyFist: [i1309.photobucket.com image 600x576]

Probably the greatest gift I've ever received, my parents bought it for me last Christmas. I adore it.

Mine sits on a shelf. Unopened. 
Might be time to dust it off and reread them all.

I bought three when they came out.  I gave one away, I have one for reading, and one still in plastic.

Ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
so maybe I should just buy another .... or read the old paperbacks ...


If you're in it for the long haul, I'd buy another three...

I have all the old paperbacks, too, but they have fallen apart.  By the time you're old, someone richer than you is going to wish he had the anthology, and no one is going to know what paper is anymore.
 
2013-11-13 04:50:08 AM  

NewportBarGuy: When the Plain Dealer asked him about the Postal Service's "Calvin and Hobbes" stamp, Watterson said he planned to use it immediately: "I'm going to get in my horse and buggy and snail-mail a check for my newspaper subscription."

What's his Fark handle?? heh...


I suspect a few names...
 
2013-11-13 06:32:19 AM  
FTA: "Watterson's haunting and ambiguous final strip  from 1995 - with its largely empty concluding panel - is one of the great pop-culture sendoffs, up to and including the last episode of "The Sopranos."

Good article.  The author should get nut punched for this line though.  What kind of comparison is that?!

Can't wait to see this flick.
 
2013-11-13 06:36:50 AM  
Reading the books again with a mature, adult perspective, one thing comes alarmingly clear to me: Calvin is a certified schizophrenic.

It's played for laughs that he sees Hobbes (and snowmen and the cardboard box and everything else) differently than others and it's mostly just chalked up to having a harmless yet occasionally destructive imagination, but when Calvin carries on in his fantasy world and never breaks character, is never talked or reasoned out of it, and each new input stimuli -- from his parents to teachers and other authority figures -- simply reinforces his fantasy narrative instead of snapping him back to Earth, there is a seriously deep, highly sinister and very disturbing mind inside that head of his.

He simply cannot distinguish between reality and his psychosis. He's not pretending that Hobbes is alive, he thinks that Hobbes really IS alive and moreover someone that he habitually gets into fights with and frequently loses to. Even in the presence of others, he carries on conversations and interactions with Hobbes as if Hobbes is a living thing.

Watterson always played off the nature of Hobbes' identity as "Calvin sees Hobbes one way and everyone sees Hobbes a different way", but that's a very understated way to say that Calvin is legitimately insane.

But what is Hobbes really? Well, the answer's obvious: Hobbes is Tyler Durdin.
 
2013-11-13 06:46:14 AM  

TinyFist: [i1309.photobucket.com image 600x576]

Probably the greatest gift I've ever received, my parents bought it for me last Christmas. I adore it.


I thought about buying those. But I have all the original books. Bought them when they came out. Read the hell out of those things.
 
2013-11-13 07:26:50 AM  
I have the backbreaking tome that is the compete collection. I'm surprised it and its companion the complete Far Side haven't been responsible for many deaths from people falling asleep with these books on their chest.
I need to buy another copy of both because the mileage and wear on each is embarrassing.
I still go through them both almost yearly.
 
2013-11-13 07:35:30 AM  

Ishkur: Reading the books again with a mature, adult perspective, one thing comes alarmingly clear to me: Calvin is a certified schizophrenic.

It's played for laughs that he sees Hobbes (and snowmen and the cardboard box and everything else) differently than others and it's mostly just chalked up to having a harmless yet occasionally destructive imagination, but when Calvin carries on in his fantasy world and never breaks character, is never talked or reasoned out of it, and each new input stimuli -- from his parents to teachers and other authority figures -- simply reinforces his fantasy narrative instead of snapping him back to Earth, there is a seriously deep, highly sinister and very disturbing mind inside that head of his.

He simply cannot distinguish between reality and his psychosis. He's not pretending that Hobbes is alive, he thinks that Hobbes really IS alive and moreover someone that he habitually gets into fights with and frequently loses to. Even in the presence of others, he carries on conversations and interactions with Hobbes as if Hobbes is a living thing.

Watterson always played off the nature of Hobbes' identity as "Calvin sees Hobbes one way and everyone sees Hobbes a different way", but that's a very understated way to say that Calvin is legitimately insane.

But what is Hobbes really? Well, the answer's obvious: Hobbes is Tyler Durdin.


Why don't you post the fake where Calvin gets on Ritalin while you're at it?
 
2013-11-13 07:39:33 AM  

Ishkur: Reading the books again with a mature, adult perspective, one thing comes alarmingly clear to me: Calvin is a certified schizophrenic.

It's played for laughs that he sees Hobbes (and snowmen and the cardboard box and everything else) differently than others and it's mostly just chalked up to having a harmless yet occasionally destructive imagination, but when Calvin carries on in his fantasy world and never breaks character, is never talked or reasoned out of it, and each new input stimuli -- from his parents to teachers and other authority figures -- simply reinforces his fantasy narrative instead of snapping him back to Earth, there is a seriously deep, highly sinister and very disturbing mind inside that head of his.

He simply cannot distinguish between reality and his psychosis. He's not pretending that Hobbes is alive, he thinks that Hobbes really IS alive and moreover someone that he habitually gets into fights with and frequently loses to. Even in the presence of others, he carries on conversations and interactions with Hobbes as if Hobbes is a living thing.

Watterson always played off the nature of Hobbes' identity as "Calvin sees Hobbes one way and everyone sees Hobbes a different way", but that's a very understated way to say that Calvin is legitimately insane.

But what is Hobbes really? Well, the answer's obvious: Hobbes is Tyler Durdin.


stop trying to over psycoanlyse these things.

Calvin is obviously being haunted by a Pooka
 
2013-11-13 07:46:06 AM  

namatad: [rymimg.com image 499x163]
my all time favorite


They're all good,but the "snowmen" featured ones are the best, IMHO.

/ still chuckling after all of these years
 
2013-11-13 07:50:40 AM  

TinyFist: [i1309.photobucket.com image 600x576]

Probably the greatest gift I've ever received, my parents bought it for me last Christmas. I adore it.


How's the binding on that? Amazon's reviewers complain big time about it.
 
2013-11-13 07:51:03 AM  

Ishkur: Reading the books again with a mature, adult perspective, one thing comes alarmingly clear to me: Calvin is a certified schizophrenic.

It's played for laughs that he sees Hobbes (and snowmen and the cardboard box and everything else) differently than others and it's mostly just chalked up to having a harmless yet occasionally destructive imagination, but when Calvin carries on in his fantasy world and never breaks character, is never talked or reasoned out of it, and each new input stimuli -- from his parents to teachers and other authority figures -- simply reinforces his fantasy narrative instead of snapping him back to Earth, there is a seriously deep, highly sinister and very disturbing mind inside that head of his.

He simply cannot distinguish between reality and his psychosis. He's not pretending that Hobbes is alive, he thinks that Hobbes really IS alive and moreover someone that he habitually gets into fights with and frequently loses to. Even in the presence of others, he carries on conversations and interactions with Hobbes as if Hobbes is a living thing.

Watterson always played off the nature of Hobbes' identity as "Calvin sees Hobbes one way and everyone sees Hobbes a different way", but that's a very understated way to say that Calvin is legitimately insane.

But what is Hobbes really? Well, the answer's obvious: Hobbes is Tyler Durdin.


Calvin reflects something in all of us. Perhaps we are all schizophrenic?
 
2013-11-13 08:10:01 AM  

TinyFist: [i1309.photobucket.com image 600x576]

Probably the greatest gift I've ever received, my parents bought it for me last Christmas. I adore it.


got one ...its great
 
2013-11-13 08:18:11 AM  

Cheese eating surrender monkey: Ishkur: Reading the books again with a mature, adult perspective, one thing comes alarmingly clear to me: Calvin is a certified schizophrenic.

It's played for laughs that he sees Hobbes (and snowmen and the cardboard box and everything else) differently than others and it's mostly just chalked up to having a harmless yet occasionally destructive imagination, but when Calvin carries on in his fantasy world and never breaks character, is never talked or reasoned out of it, and each new input stimuli -- from his parents to teachers and other authority figures -- simply reinforces his fantasy narrative instead of snapping him back to Earth, there is a seriously deep, highly sinister and very disturbing mind inside that head of his.

He simply cannot distinguish between reality and his psychosis. He's not pretending that Hobbes is alive, he thinks that Hobbes really IS alive and moreover someone that he habitually gets into fights with and frequently loses to. Even in the presence of others, he carries on conversations and interactions with Hobbes as if Hobbes is a living thing.

Watterson always played off the nature of Hobbes' identity as "Calvin sees Hobbes one way and everyone sees Hobbes a different way", but that's a very understated way to say that Calvin is legitimately insane.

But what is Hobbes really? Well, the answer's obvious: Hobbes is Tyler Durdin.

Why don't you post the fake where Calvin gets on Ritalin while you're at it?


Maybe he can examine how the Shaggy and Scooby are on pot, too.  Or the homoerotic relationship between Batman and Robin.  Or a deconstruction of HR Pufnstuf in the context of the emerging sex and drug culture of the early 1970s.

Or maybe we can leave our childhoods where they belong and stop trying drag them kicking and screaming into grown up psychoanalysis.
 
2013-11-13 08:19:23 AM  

TinyFist: [i1309.photobucket.com image 600x576]

Probably the greatest gift I've ever received, my parents bought it for me last Christmas. I adore it.


Fellow Farker and brother FLMountainMan bought me a set a few years ago.  Just awesome.  I've reread them from cover to cover serveral times
 
2013-11-13 08:28:25 AM  
I found a gem the other day. A comic artist publishes a comic strip on Facebook called "Calvin and Company", an homage to the original. The premise: Calvin is all grown up, in his 20s and married, and has passed Hobbes down to his twin son and daughter, who are just as crazy as he was. A lot of references to the original, and very funny.
 
2013-11-13 08:32:36 AM  
Not to be that guy, but this is my favorite comic strip finale.  I cried a little.   1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-11-13 08:37:55 AM  
C&H were great. That article.... not so much. Subby has to be the author.
 
2013-11-13 08:40:52 AM  
they were ok.  but this guy

fasterthantheworld.com
 
2013-11-13 08:52:41 AM  

JonnyBGoode: I found a gem the other day. A comic artist publishes a comic strip on Facebook called "Calvin and Company", an homage to the original. The premise: Calvin is all grown up, in his 20s and married, and has passed Hobbes down to his twin son and daughter, who are just as crazy as he was. A lot of references to the original, and very funny.


The author hasn't really said either way but the comic strip Frazz appears to be a grown up Calvin comic if for no other reason than his hair
 
2013-11-13 09:07:27 AM  
Calvin and Company's first strip (you can follow the album from there; he's up to about 80 strips now, I think):
scontent-a-lax.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2013-11-13 09:13:50 AM  

TinyFist: [i1309.photobucket.com image 600x576]

Probably the greatest gift I've ever received, my parents bought it for me last Christmas. I adore it.


Wife got that for me for Xmas the first year it came out. I ignored the rest of the family all week reading it.

/pulls it off the shelf quite often
//sits next to my Far Side collection on a book shelf of awesomeness.
 
2013-11-13 09:14:05 AM  

JonnyBGoode: Calvin and Company's first strip (you can follow the album from there; he's up to about 80 strips now, I think):
[scontent-a-lax.xx.fbcdn.net image 720x506]


Ugh... Read the first few, don't like them.

I much prefer the short-lived "Bacon and Hobbes"   http://www.pantsareoverrated.com/archive/2011/05/10/hobbes-and-bacon/
 
2013-11-13 09:34:02 AM  
While the strip remains one of my favorite comic diversions of all time, sharing the space with Breathed and Gahan Wilson, my favorite C&H strips were ones with Dad explaining things ('cause that's what I would be like as a dad) or the creative snowman strips. Awesome. The mashup of C&H with AYB. Funny stuff.
 
2013-11-13 09:39:30 AM  
Because none of you slackers are going to do it!

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-11-13 09:40:16 AM  

Ishkur: Reading the books again with a mature, adult perspective, one thing comes alarmingly clear to me: Calvin is a certified schizophrenic.


Nope, Calvin is a child. He is 5, which is right around the time children are developing the ability to differentiate fantasy and reality. Unless you want to make the case that all children are schizophrenic and we eventually grow out of it Calvin is just a (mostly) normal kid.
 
2013-11-13 09:42:37 AM  
I wish Calvin had learned to ride his bike.
 
2013-11-13 09:48:02 AM  

TinyFist: [i1309.photobucket.com image 600x576]

Probably the greatest gift I've ever received, my parents bought it for me last Christmas. I adore it.


I'm strongly pondering the paperback version of this for my 6 year old, who has recently discovered the joy of comics like these. So far Garfield, Far Side, and Dilbert(which are all I have atm) he's gone through. I think he'd like these.
 
2013-11-13 09:55:28 AM  
"atheism, impiety, and the like are words of the greatest defamation possible"  - Hobbes
 
2013-11-13 10:11:33 AM  
During the second Gulf war I made car packages for a guy I knew and his squad for Christmas.

In the bottom of each one I put one of my Calvin and Hobbes comic books.  Haven't seen them since...

Might be time to go buy that full collection...
 
2013-11-13 10:22:05 AM  

George Babbitt: "Theism, piety, and the like are words of the greatest defamation possible"  - Hobbes


Fixed that for rational humans.
 
2013-11-13 10:27:43 AM  

namatad: George Babbitt: "Theism, piety, and the like are words of the greatest defamation possible"  - Hobbes

Fixed that for rational humans.


That was a quote you tard, you can't fix it.
 
2013-11-13 10:38:15 AM  

JonnyBGoode: Calvin and Company's first strip (you can follow the album from there; he's up to about 80 strips now, I think):
[scontent-a-lax.xx.fbcdn.net image 720x506]


The only problem I have with it is kids with siblings (especially a twin) don't tend to need the imaginary friend and deep fantasy life of a Calvin
 
2013-11-13 10:38:50 AM  
Spiffy tag?

I see what you did there....

jefferywilcox.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-11-13 10:42:34 AM  
calvin and hobbes would never work as a comic today.  the media landscape is just so overwhelming that i can't imagine any cartoonist doing a strip without ever mentioning modern pop culture stuff.  calvin never mentions any actual tv shows or movies or anything, there are no references to batman or superman or the simpsons or james bond or any known franchise, even though calvin parodies a lot of it.  it helps give the strip a timeless feel.  but modern audiences are so swamped with media tie-ins and pop culture in-jokes that i can't see any modern cartoonist trying to write a comic strip without those easy references and punchlines.

as much as i love bloom county, reading the old strips is hard sometimes because there are so many references to politicians and celebrities in the 80s that i simply do not understand half of them.  in the collected editions, even berke breathed admits he barely remembers some of the people who get named in the strip.  thankfully, we don't have that problem with calvin and hobbes.
 
2013-11-13 10:51:28 AM  

George Babbitt: namatad: George Babbitt: "Theism, piety, and the like are words of the greatest defamation possible"  - Hobbes

Fixed that for rational humans.

That was a quote you I am a tard, you can't fix it.


Fixed for people who understand the difference between a quote and ripping on the quote and the poster of the quote.
 
2013-11-13 10:57:49 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-11-13 11:10:55 AM  

namatad: George Babbitt: namatad: George Babbitt: "Theism, piety, and the like are words of the greatest defamation possible"  - Hobbes

Fixed that for rational humans.

That was a quote you I am a tard, you can't fix it.

Fixed for people who understand the difference between a quote and ripping on the quote and the poster of the quote.


Then address the quote without rewriting history to your preferred version. It was a quote from the person that Hobbes was named after. Take it up with Watterson.
 
2013-11-13 11:21:36 AM  
Aww Geez! Now look what you made me do :)

http://scans-daily.dreamwidth.org/1385835.html
 
2013-11-13 11:21:37 AM  
Sadly, much like the way they look at all the other things from the 90's, the post-millennial snots will just shrug and wonder what all the big deal was about.
 
2013-11-13 11:25:42 AM  
THIS panel. This one single solitary panel, sums up my personal philosophy. Know it and you know me.

bloggingturtle.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-11-13 11:33:35 AM  
Out there, he's gone.  But he's not gone inside me.
 
2013-11-13 11:39:03 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
Displayed 50 of 87 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report