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(Some Guy)   Sixteen non-Americans talk about the things they couldn't or wouldn't believe about America before living there. The common denominator: Serving sizes   (thoughtcatalog.com) divider line 407
    More: Interesting, Americans, serving sizes, Harris Teeter, Guyana, SSI, border checkpoints, Kit Kats, American Foreign Policy  
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21533 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Nov 2013 at 11:12 PM (22 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-13 07:31:55 PM
12349876
The Voice of Doom: I wouldn't really call it "academies".

That's what Wikipedia calls it.
Bayern Munich Junior Team is the youth academy for German football club Bayern Munich.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bayern_Munich_Junior_Team


Hmm, I still think those academies are a special thing done only by clubs with pro teams who are looking for future professional players and they are comparatively rare.
According to the wiki article, that Bayern Youth Academy does a "Talent Day" where it tests 500 players.
Given that the academy has 160-170 players, they're likely to pick..what, maybe ten players?
The other 490 kids not making it into that academy have been trained and are still playing somewhere.
I was thinking mostly about the other 490, i.e. normal German kids who want to play competitive (because they want to play, but not necessarily become a pro).
As one of those kids, you won't consider yourself as part of a club's academy program, you're simply playing for your local village's amateur club on an age-appropriate team.
Then again, it might simply be a matter of translation: to me "youth academy" means something like a grooming program for future pros and not your average club's youth teams where the majority of youth are playing.

Just for comparison:
* Wiki about the German football association: "25,000 clubs are organised in state associations, fielding nearly 170,000 teams with over two million active players and totalling over six million members"
* Bayern is Germany's biggest sports club with 200,000 members (not all soccer, though)
* that Wikipedia-Link says the Bayern's Youth Academy has 165 players and 16 coaches, the Bayern's wiki page says they are organized in 11 teams.
* the local soccer club around the corner has its best team playing at a local 6th-level amateur league and according to the club's website it currently has 34 youth teams competing at different age groups and league levels.
That club fields more competitive teams in two single age groups than that whole Bayern academy.
To be fair: that club is a very big, although rather unknown, club and over the decades its youth teams have produced several Bundesliga-level pros and even internationals; examples include current Croatian head coach Niko Kovac (and his brother Robert) for Croatia or Christian Ziege who became big after transferring from there to, ironically(?), Bayern Munich's pro team at the age of 18.
 
2013-11-13 08:07:41 PM

The Voice of Doom: Hmm, I still think those academies are a special thing done only by clubs with pro teams who are looking for future professional players and they are comparatively rare.


I know they're rare, and that's why the best kids go there.  There is no equivalent in America, so the best kids play for the school team.  The best athletes in Europe generally aren't playing under the banner of their local school, the best athletes in America generally are.
 
2013-11-13 11:57:01 PM

zencentral: A friend visiting from Thailand asked if he could have a basin of warm water, soap and a dry hand towel in the bathroom to clean himself up with after taking a dump.

My wife was grossed out by the thought and asked me to talk to him about it.

I jokingly told him, "Your in the civilized world now and we use an invention called toilet paper here".

He thought it was ä disgusting, unsanitary practice and said, "If for some reason you accidentally got a bit of excrement on your face, would you clean it off using soap and water or wipe it off with a piece of dry paper".


I lived in Nepal for a couple of years, and they, like India and many other Asian countries, do the "clean yourself with water rather than toilet paper" thing.  It really is better in some ways.  But it also takes some getting used to if you grew up in a society that uses toilet paper.
 
2013-11-14 12:09:57 AM

CruiserTwelve: 9Speed: Mon he arrived in Ft Lauderdale.
Tues he thought it would be fun to drive to Washington DC.
Weds we're going to see the arch in St Louis
Thurs let's hike the Grand Canyon in the morning and then go to Disneyland in the afternoon
Fri drive back to FL
etc.

A friend had relatives visit from Ireland a few years ago. They planned to fly into New York City, rent a car, and drive to San Francisco. They told him they'd be ready for lunch when they got to Denver and wanted to know if he'd join them.


During the Rodney King riots in LA, we had a group of students from France in my hometown in Wisconsin. When the riots started the parents were freaking out and wanted there kids sent back home right away, they thought they would be in danger. Once it was explained just how far from LA we were, they relaxed.
 
2013-11-14 01:01:08 AM

prickly pete v2: During the Rodney King riots in LA, we had a group of students from France in my hometown in Wisconsin. When the riots started the parents were freaking out and wanted there kids sent back home right away, they thought they would be in danger. Once it was explained just how far from LA we were, they relaxed.


Weird thing to me is when some news event happens in the suburbs, foreign media will relate the distance to some city that's NOT the city the suburb "belongs to."

So, some event happens in say, Naperville, IL, and the Japanese news will be all about how many km it is away from... NYC (although in modern days more places will at least say "it's a suburb of Chicago, XXX miles from NYC" or whatever).

Meanwhile, the horrible train derailment in Amagasaki in 2005, the US news was all about how far that is from Tokyo, when it's in the Osaka region and anyone who thinks of normal Japan geography will think of "it's a burb of Osaka" if anything.
 
2013-11-14 03:45:45 AM

kombi: When I was in soccer radio we would have Euro players come in and complain...we dont use pal for our video standard, we use 110v and not 220.


I have this feeling you've turned someone complaining that their hairdryer didn't work or failing to understand why their video tapes don't work into a criticism of America. That says a lot more about you than it does them.
 
2013-11-14 08:04:20 AM
I also find it odd that someone from India would complain about our public transit system.

www.sumit4all.com
 
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