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(Thought Catalog)   Sixteen non-Americans talk about the things they couldn't or wouldn't believe about America before living there. The common denominator: Serving sizes   (thoughtcatalog.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, Americans, serving sizes, Harris Teeter, Guyana, SSI, border checkpoints, Kit Kats, American Foreign Policy  
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21624 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Nov 2013 at 11:12 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-13 01:20:56 AM  
People don't really care about the FIFA World Cup even though USA qualifies.

/surprises no one
//not really
 
2013-11-13 01:23:31 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: flucto: Interesting. Even moving back to the US after a couple of years triggers some of these observations. Wait, I can buy milk, on Sunday, at 9pm, in 200 places? In gallons? For $3??? And the cashier is nice? And wishes me a blessed day? WHATTHEIDONTEVEN

I was surprised how many people thought that friendly cashiers was odd.  I didn't realize that was anything special.  The same goes for the surprise at people addressing each other by first name, I know there are some very formal societies out there, but I figured most of the world was more along the lines of the informal way we do it here.


I've had people mention it's weird that on the bus in Portland you say "Thank you" to the driver.  You just do.  They got you safely from point-A to point-B.

Yet, to people from even San Francisco or Seattle this is weird.  I just take it for granted and always say thanks to the driver.  On the West Coast you get looks, on the East Coast you just get stared at for it, but I can't break the habit anymore.
 
2013-11-13 01:24:27 AM  

Farty McPooPants: One thing I noticed that no one mentioned was advertising.  In the states, it's a constant bombardment everywhere, anytime.  Being overseas for a while you get used to not being pestered so much and, in some countries, it is so lacking you almost miss it.
When you come back, it is a shock to the system how much you are targeted by ads, commercials, billboards, everywhere you look, everything you hear, has some percentage of advertising associated with it.  It tends to desensitize you, yet, it also seems like it's that chatty friend you have that never shuts up.


True.  And yet there are some exceptions.  One thing that annoyed me about South Korea was the little trucks that went around selling stuff, with loudspeakers mounted blaring out a barrage of advertising for their wares --- usually foodstuff like vegetables or fruits.  I found it extremely annoying and was cheered by the thought that I don't have to put up with that nonsense in America.

Then I get back, go to a Wal-Mart, and now they have these video-screens mounted everywhere running ads.

At least I still don't have to deal with it just walking down the street.  Yet.
 
2013-11-13 01:24:28 AM  

ciberido: Probably. Koreans call them "handphones" and refuse to believe me when I tell them that's not actually a word in (American) English.


Okay, this has been bothering me. I always refer to them as "hand phones" but I can't figure out where I picked up the practice. The Brits call them "mobiles", which makes me shudder a little.

Also, absolute cultural disorientation when I found out my fellow Americans don't use the word "aircon".
 
2013-11-13 01:24:36 AM  

Seth'n'Spectrum: I went to high school and university abroad, the first in China and the second in the UK. When I came back to the U.S. to work, the first things I noticed were:

1. Obnoxious displays of nationalism everywhere - giant flags at auto dealerships, framed flags at subway stations, fawning deference for the military (our soldiers aren't even conscripted poor bastards anymore).
2. People talking to public bus drivers. STFU and move on already. Talking to strangers in public more generally.
3. Retail banking fees of two kinds: cross-bank ATM fees (nonexistent in the UK) and direct deposit fees (my landlords in DC and NY always wanted checks and refused direct deposit).
4. The price of some staples, like bread and vegetables, is much higher than in the UK (and obviously much higher than in China).

I'm living in a dorm now with a lot of foreigners. One of the things that really surprises them is the extent to which Spanish-speakers are tolerated. The bars around here also hate us because people always forget to tip.

/are you supposed to tip when you go to a restaurant to pick up take-out? No, right?


Depends. Big order from a restaurant. Yes tip.
 
2013-11-13 01:25:18 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: flucto: Interesting. Even moving back to the US after a couple of years triggers some of these observations. Wait, I can buy milk, on Sunday, at 9pm, in 200 places? In gallons? For $3??? And the cashier is nice? And wishes me a blessed day? WHATTHEIDONTEVEN

I was gone for two years. When I came back, I couldn't believe people could drink 32 oz. of soda. And OMG! 44 oz! Then I saw somebody carrying around a literal plastic bucket from AM/PM (with an actual handle to carry it.) In Chile, we'd buy a 1-liter bottle of Coca-Cola as a treat to go with dinner, which was for everybody -- small glass, no ice.

It doesn't shock me any more as much as make me facepalm.


Does the Chilean Africola label still have a ridiculous witch doctor caricature?
 
2013-11-13 01:26:18 AM  
hahaha, mexican coke.

by the way, the bottler of that product is switching to high fructose corn syrup.
luckily for you cane sugar coke lovers, they will continue to make the "mexican coke" in glass bottles they export to the US the same way.

coke makes me thirsty.
 
2013-11-13 01:26:31 AM  

kombi: DrunkWithImpotence: kombi: Also culturally. Here in the USA we shop for the week. We plan our meals ahead. We dont shop for a day or two. Some things do taste different here. We dont eat that bitter chocolate like in other countries. We just like it different. Here its cheaper to make coke with syrup and not sugar. And yes the sugar coke tastes better.

My mother has a basement and a Costco membership, she can afford to by toilet paper by the pallet.  Mrs. Impotence and I on the other hand, live in a two bedroom apartment.  We shop three times a week because we just don't have the stooge space.

But I still buy Mexican Coke by the case once a month.  Seventeen dollars for twenty-four bottles at Smart and Final.

When ever there are discussions like this, thats really what it comes down to. We have space. Lots of space. Lots of unused space. Europe is not quite as big as we think. Its what 1 or 2 day trip by train to almost any ware in Europe. Im not talking Russia but Europe. The only place I would say is close is Australia.


I mean close in its vastness and wide open spaces.
 
2013-11-13 01:28:48 AM  

RINO: 9Speed: Shostie: America is literally HUGE.

I think a lot of Americans don't quite comprehend how massive this country really is.

A few months ago I had a long-time friend fly in from Denmark to stay with me for a week.  He had already planned out an itinerary for all the places he wanted to drive to...

Mon he arrived in Ft Lauderdale.
Tues he thought it would be fun to drive to Washington DC.
Weds we're going to see the arch in St Louis
Thurs let's hike the Grand Canyon in the morning and then go to Disneyland in the afternoon
Fri drive back to FL
etc.

I've found this map to be a useful visual aid for that sort of thing.

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 300x287]


See this is what I meant. I learned very early on in school that most of our states are as big/larger than most european countries, roughly speaking anyway. I cannot believe that grown adults have never looked at a globe or world atlas or something, and not realized the general size their country is to others. It's no wonder they're surprised we all have cars.
 
2013-11-13 01:29:14 AM  
We do drink more here. Big bottles of water. Big coffees, Iced drinks. Most of the world is just happy to have something to drink. They dont care if its warm. What it comes down to is we are just a different culture. Does not make it good or bad. Its just different from others.
 
2013-11-13 01:29:47 AM  

gunslinger_RG: Also, 100% of all the Germans I entertained for work, were fanatical about Mexican food.  They loved it!  I thought that if someone opened a true Mexican restaurant in Germany that there would be a constant line around the block.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_immigration_to_Mexico

There are reasons.
 
2013-11-13 01:33:13 AM  
I had friends visit from my home planet of Dalron 7. They were amazed at the lack of Tyrasaur beasts on the streets and that they could walk around freely with no fear of being impregnated with larvae.

The grocery stores were sa source of confusion since most of our foods are deadly poison to them, and my cousin Mih fell dead after trying a hotdog snack thing from some sample stand....
 
2013-11-13 01:33:44 AM  

kombi: We do drink more here. Big bottles of water. Big coffees, Iced drinks. Most of the world is just happy to have something to drink. They dont care if its warm. What it comes down to is we are just a different culture. Does not make it good or bad. Its just different from others.


bottom line is it takes energy and money to make ice.
i had to drink warm soda at a movie theater. bollocks to that!!!
 
2013-11-13 01:34:46 AM  
One thing I learned from years of waiting tables in a touristy-type restaurant is Europeans are very uncomfortable with lots of ice in their drinks. Americans are very much the opposite.
 
2013-11-13 01:35:16 AM  

davidphogan: gunslinger_RG: Also, 100% of all the Germans I entertained for work, were fanatical about Mexican food.  They loved it!  I thought that if someone opened a true Mexican restaurant in Germany that there would be a constant line around the block.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_immigration_to_Mexico

There are reasons.


And along the road, they taught beer-brewing to Mexicans; hell, even my own city had a brewery (Supposedly to fight alcoholism). Sort of a lost art because of the crap commercial beer flooding the market these days, but we're getting back the hang of it.
 
2013-11-13 01:35:36 AM  

kombi: Yes we have a very large geographically deserve country. And We dont have a great public trans portion system. Again geographically deserve and the size


That's part of it, but I think a big reason why America has such a poor transit system is that Americans are very individualistic and we like to own our own personal versions of things rather than share some sort of communal version.  So, individual cars rather than sharing trains or buses.

Another example is computers.  Americans love to own their own computers.  So you'll take your own personal laptop to a coffee shop that has free wifi, and you'll see a lot of other people with their laptops.  As opposed to, say, South Korea, where you'd go to an internet cafe and rent a computer for an hour (or 20).

Then there's the way Americans seem to have a larger "personal bubble" or zone of space.  It's especially noticeable at a public place like a theater where it's considered intrusive, even creepy, to sit next to a stranger.  No, in the USA you're expected to always leave at least one empty seat.

It's odd, especially thinking about some of the comments about how Americans "overshare" personal details.  It's like Americans have a great willingness to share personal information but an equally great reluctance to share physical objects or space.
 
2013-11-13 01:36:57 AM  
Captain James T. Smirk:

 But you know what's really frightening? If you drink enough of it, you begin to like it.

Just like America.
 
2013-11-13 01:37:34 AM  
Canadians and Australians understand distance. Europeans, not so much.
 
2013-11-13 01:40:20 AM  

brantgoose: ecmoRandomNumbers: The[y] couldn't believe that we like Root Beer.

Heh. I took a big bottle of Dr. Pepper and a bottle of A&W root beer to some friends in Santiago. The look on their faces when they tasted it was awesome.

"Sabe a jarabe antitusivo." ("It tastes like cough syrup.") They couldn't believe that some people prefer those drinks to Coke or Sprite.

I hate Dr. Pepper. My Mother included one in a C.A.R.E. package when I was an undergrad and I could not finish it. Poured it out. Yes, it does taste like cough syrup. Straight up, it tastes like the juice from a jar of marschino cherries.

Blah! Yuck! Phtooie! Phtoie! I also hate Cherry Cola and Cream Soda, the sickliest beverage in the world. I would happily drink a bottle of Robitussin over Cream Soda.

www.heyreverb.com


Agrees (nsfw audio).
 
2013-11-13 01:40:28 AM  

Confabulat: One thing I learned from years of waiting tables in a touristy-type restaurant is Europeans are very uncomfortable with lots of ice in their drinks. Americans are very much the opposite.


before the advent of free refills, it may seem like a gyp to get a glass full of ice and hardly any beverage.
a jewish friend used to go to mcdonalds and order a large coke, no ice, and a courtesy cup of ice, so he would not be paying for ice.

os for the UK, my experience led me to believe the costs of energy and big commercial ice makers just means it isn't common unless the establishment serves a lot of customers who like lots of ice (like americans).
 
2013-11-13 01:42:19 AM  

davidphogan: I've had people mention it's weird that on the bus in Portland you say "Thank you" to the driver. You just do. They got you safely from point-A to point-B.


yeah.  I really don't get why that's weird.

The first time I really took the bus regularly was in college, and the college and city buses both - it's just what you do, *especially* since they have to negotiate tight turns and snow/ice conditions in a huge freaking vehicle.

Though I don't really notice if other people do or not.
 
2013-11-13 01:43:14 AM  
New Yorkers, at least when I was growing up there, did not over share. Or share, for that matter.
Louisiana, when I lived there, if you stood next to someone for five minutes, you got their life story.
Texans love to talk, but not much is personal.
 
2013-11-13 01:43:50 AM  
america is blowing up people thousands of miles away to protect our CHEAP ICE!
 
2013-11-13 01:46:41 AM  

ciberido: kombi: Yes we have a very large geographically deserve country. And We dont have a great public trans portion system. Again geographically deserve and the size

That's part of it, but I think a big reason why America has such a poor transit system is that Americans are very individualistic and we like to own our own personal versions of things rather than share some sort of communal version.  So, individual cars rather than sharing trains or buses.

Another example is computers.  Americans love to own their own computers.  So you'll take your own personal laptop to a coffee shop that has free wifi, and you'll see a lot of other people with their laptops.  As opposed to, say, South Korea, where you'd go to an internet cafe and rent a computer for an hour (or 20).

Then there's the way Americans seem to have a larger "personal bubble" or zone of space.  It's especially noticeable at a public place like a theater where it's considered intrusive, even creepy, to sit next to a stranger.  No, in the USA you're expected to always leave at least one empty seat.

It's odd, especially thinking about some of the comments about how Americans "overshare" personal details.  It's like Americans have a great willingness to share personal information but an equally great reluctance to share physical objects or space.


Ya its cultural. We are not used to going to sporting event or concert and not having an assigned seat. We dont kiss our friends on the cheek. If we are in a theater that is not crowded. We dont sit on top of each other. We give each other space.
When it comes to mass tansit. Other than a few US cities. There really is not any. We live so far apart. Up till about 20is years ago there was still green belt (non built up areas) between LA and San Diego. Not it seems like Sd to SF is one big city. We just did not built the infrastructure. And alot of our cities in most of the country where not  easy to access. It costs alot to build trains thru mountain ranges.
In in a place like LA. There is no real city center where people work. You say I work in LA. well thats aprox 469 square miles.
 
2013-11-13 01:47:10 AM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: davidphogan: I've had people mention it's weird that on the bus in Portland you say "Thank you" to the driver. You just do. They got you safely from point-A to point-B.

yeah.  I really don't get why that's weird.

The first time I really took the bus regularly was in college, and the college and city buses both - it's just what you do, *especially* since they have to negotiate tight turns and snow/ice conditions in a huge freaking vehicle.

Though I don't really notice if other people do or not.


I guess in hindsight I've never heard someone thank a driver in NY, LA, SD, SF, etc...  Maybe a cab driver, but not a bus driver.  In Portland it catches my attention when someone doesn't.

But I've only really noticed because people not from here think it's so weird.
 
2013-11-13 01:47:28 AM  
One thing I didn't see mentioned that I thought I would have: Lines (or queues)

In the USA everyone understands the concept of standing in line for things, and lines are very orderly. There are understood rules about not cutting in line and not pushing or standing too close, etc. And, you will be corrected if you try to jump in front of someone.

In most developing countries I've visited (and I'm looking mostly at you, India), getting service at any counter was always this mad mob pushing and shoving your way to the front. In these mobs, people have no hesitation to get extremely close and physical. Shocking for folks used to orderly lines.
 
2013-11-13 01:48:56 AM  

Popular Opinion: america is blowing up people thousands of miles away to protect our CHEAP ICE!


Ice is civilization!

www.peterweircave.com
 
2013-11-13 01:49:35 AM  

Popular Opinion: Confabulat: One thing I learned from years of waiting tables in a touristy-type restaurant is Europeans are very uncomfortable with lots of ice in their drinks. Americans are very much the opposite.

before the advent of free refills, it may seem like a gyp to get a glass full of ice and hardly any beverage.
a jewish friend used to go to mcdonalds and order a large coke, no ice, and a courtesy cup of ice, so he would not be paying for ice.

os for the UK, my experience led me to believe the costs of energy and big commercial ice makers just means it isn't common unless the establishment serves a lot of customers who like lots of ice (like americans).


Also, something I've only seen in the USA: Ice in beer! UGGGHHHHHHH!!
 
2013-11-13 01:50:02 AM  
I remember flying from Zurich back to JFK airport. Zurich was clean and quiet and just generally all around nice. I really liked the place, but I can see how it would be boring after the charm wore off. The pron shop with huge sexually explicit posters in the window right next to the medieval church was a nice plus. The airport was freakishly clean and new. When you get to JFK you're hustled in cattle-like herds down grimy grey corridors until you get to a big room packed with pissed off people, with huge TVs blaring CNN while customs assholes bark questions at you. I felt like I was in some third world dictatorship or something.
 
2013-11-13 01:50:15 AM  

Shorelinefarker: Canadians and Australians understand distance. Europeans, not so much.


Your right. I lumped Canadians in with the US. Even in a place like Russia. Its big. But all the cities where basically built along a train route. Not spread out alot.
 
2013-11-13 01:50:38 AM  

simplicimus: Louisiana, when I lived there


What part?
 
2013-11-13 01:50:58 AM  

pyrotek85: Shostie: America is literally HUGE.

I think a lot of Americans don't quite comprehend how massive this country really is.

I've seen this observation in other articles too, and I'm always surprised by it. Now I haven't personally traveled all over the country, but I have looked at maps and globes that show states/countries to scale to each other. Doesn't everyone else learn this in school at some point?


Whenever I would show a Nepali a map of Asia (or a globe), they would be amazed at how small Nepal was compared to other Asian countries such as China or India.  To be fair, India and China are both pretty big countries, but still, I was surprised at how surprised they were.

Conversely, they didn't seem all that surprised to see how big the USA was.

The again, a Nepali man once asked me which bus he would take to get to America.  Well, it's a landlocked country.  I'm not sure the man knew what an ocean was.
 
2013-11-13 01:51:02 AM  
12349876
I mentioned it in another post, but I think the reason for this is that your young people who are actually good at sports are on the academy teams rather than school teams. America does not have the equivalent to your academies.


I wouldn't really call it "academies".
If you want to play a sport a bit more regularly or competitive than at school, you find a local sports club which offers that sport and which might or might not have teams in an organized league.
Obviously(?), there are clubs of different sizes and levels of professionalism and if a club has pro teams or teams playing in the highest federal league of $sport, they're likely a lot more picky about who they'll let join.
And if kids really like the sport and have the time, they might play both at a club and at their school.

For example, I played basketball in elementary school and after the finale of the district's school tournament, one of the referees came into our cabin and asked some of us if we were interested in joining their club's team. So for some time I ended up playing basketball both at the school and with a club team for a few years.
Something similar almost happened with volleyball in high school, but I wasn't too thrilled about the potential future team mates at the club's test training (several of the players had just done their year in the military and you could tell by the tone and lack of manners).
 
2013-11-13 01:52:48 AM  

Seth'n'Spectrum: ciberido: Probably. Koreans call them "handphones" and refuse to believe me when I tell them that's not actually a word in (American) English.

Okay, this has been bothering me. I always refer to them as "hand phones" but I can't figure out where I picked up the practice. The Brits call them "mobiles", which makes me shudder a little.

Also, absolute cultural disorientation when I found out my fellow Americans don't use the word "aircon".


You sound Korean, or like someone who lived in Asia at least.
 
2013-11-13 01:53:57 AM  
Lived for a few years in Norco, then moved to Kenner. Worked downtown. Early eighties to early nineties.
 
2013-11-13 01:56:13 AM  

seelorq: ecmoRandomNumbers: flucto: Interesting. Even moving back to the US after a couple of years triggers some of these observations. Wait, I can buy milk, on Sunday, at 9pm, in 200 places? In gallons? For $3??? And the cashier is nice? And wishes me a blessed day? WHATTHEIDONTEVEN

I was gone for two years. When I came back, I couldn't believe people could drink 32 oz. of soda. And OMG! 44 oz! Then I saw somebody carrying around a literal plastic bucket from AM/PM (with an actual handle to carry it.) In Chile, we'd buy a 1-liter bottle of Coca-Cola as a treat to go with dinner, which was for everybody -- small glass, no ice.

It doesn't shock me any more as much as make me facepalm.

Does the Chilean Africola label still have a ridiculous witch doctor caricature?


Pfffft.  Africola?

upload.wikimedia.org

You should be drinking Inca Cola.
 
2013-11-13 01:57:19 AM  

simplicimus: Lived for a few years in Norco, then moved to Kenner. Worked downtown. Early eighties to early nineties.


Cool, my grandparents lived in Kenner and I had a cousin or two that lived out in Norco or Destrehan. Somewhere over there.
 
2013-11-13 01:57:26 AM  

kombi: Up till about 20is years ago there was still green belt (non built up areas) between LA and San Diego. Not it seems like Sd to SF is one big city.


When did Camp Pendleton get bulldozed, and how the hell did LA and SF get connected by sprawl?
 
2013-11-13 01:57:29 AM  

SpdrJay: I had friends visit from my home planet of Dalron 7. They were amazed at the lack of Tyrasaur beasts on the streets and that they could walk around freely with no fear of being impregnated with larvae.

The grocery stores were sa source of confusion since most of our foods are deadly poison to them, and my cousin Mih fell dead after trying a hotdog snack thing from some sample stand....


No, no that happens to people from ALL planets.
 
2013-11-13 02:02:39 AM  

jigger: simplicimus: Lived for a few years in Norco, then moved to Kenner. Worked downtown. Early eighties to early nineties.

Cool, my grandparents lived in Kenner and I had a cousin or two that lived out in Norco or Destrehan. Somewhere over there.


Well, Norco was a small town, but booming - literally. I lived there when the Cat Cracker blew-up at the refinery.
 
2013-11-13 02:03:39 AM  

stiletto_the_wise: Popular Opinion: Confabulat: One thing I learned from years of waiting tables in a touristy-type restaurant is Europeans are very uncomfortable with lots of ice in their drinks. Americans are very much the opposite.

before the advent of free refills, it may seem like a gyp to get a glass full of ice and hardly any beverage.
a jewish friend used to go to mcdonalds and order a large coke, no ice, and a courtesy cup of ice, so he would not be paying for ice.

os for the UK, my experience led me to believe the costs of energy and big commercial ice makers just means it isn't common unless the establishment serves a lot of customers who like lots of ice (like americans).

Also, something I've only seen in the USA: Ice in beer! UGGGHHHHHHH!!


good gawd!!

i would never put ice in beer, unless it was hot and i was desperate.

BUT, strip-and-get-naked is an awesome punch.
1 twelve pack of basic american lager (bud, coors light....)
2 cans of frozen lemonade concentrate
1 quart or vodka (or more).
1 bunch of ice.
mix it all together in a big drink cooler and see how long it lasts.

the result is delicious fizzy lemonade that everyone will love, unless they don't like delicious fiizzy lemonade.
 
2013-11-13 02:04:59 AM  

davidphogan: kombi: Up till about 20is years ago there was still green belt (non built up areas) between LA and San Diego. Not it seems like Sd to SF is one big city.

When did Camp Pendleton get bulldozed, and how the hell did LA and SF get connected by sprawl?


Not like it was. But all cities have grown. Some places have just become insane. Maybe a better example would be from San Bernadeno to Ventura
 
2013-11-13 02:06:33 AM  

Lionel Mandrake: EMI


Not one bite on your Sex Pistols ref.  Fark, I am disappoint.

Weird also, I watched Strangelove tonight on TCM
 
2013-11-13 02:10:08 AM  
This was really interesting. Thanks subby
 
2013-11-13 02:10:36 AM  

ciberido: seelorq: ecmoRandomNumbers: flucto: Interesting. Even moving back to the US after a couple of years triggers some of these observations. Wait, I can buy milk, on Sunday, at 9pm, in 200 places? In gallons? For $3??? And the cashier is nice? And wishes me a blessed day? WHATTHEIDONTEVEN

I was gone for two years. When I came back, I couldn't believe people could drink 32 oz. of soda. And OMG! 44 oz! Then I saw somebody carrying around a literal plastic bucket from AM/PM (with an actual handle to carry it.) In Chile, we'd buy a 1-liter bottle of Coca-Cola as a treat to go with dinner, which was for everybody -- small glass, no ice.

It doesn't shock me any more as much as make me facepalm.

Does the Chilean Africola label still have a ridiculous witch doctor caricature?

Pfffft.  Africola?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 850x566]

You should be drinking Inca Cola.


That's actually pee, isn't it?
 
2013-11-13 02:12:13 AM  

kombi: GRCooper: CygnusDarius: 

Other Latin Americans, though, seem to all hate, really *hate* Mexicans. Have you noticed that?

I did soccer radio and yes they HATE Mexicans. I mean HATE. Its hard to explain to people.


It's like this, a gross modo:

Salvadorans, Guatemalans & Hondurans resent them for treating them like shiat and pretending they're superior
Cubans look down on them as uneducated, dirty yokels
Colombians think they talk and act goofy (and have poor taste)
Venezuelans are bitter for them having stolen their trend-setting crown throughout the rest of S. America
Puerto Ricans for making them look bad since they're so much harder working
Argentinians, well, Argentinians are more arrogant than the French or South Koreans so they hate even being lumped in as being Latin Americans at all!
 
2013-11-13 02:13:39 AM  

davidphogan: kombi: Up till about 20is years ago there was still green belt (non built up areas) between LA and San Diego. Not it seems like Sd to SF is one big city.

When did Camp Pendleton get bulldozed, and how the hell did LA and SF get connected by sprawl?


During the 1980's to the 2000's. Was on the front lines of it North County San Diego went from beach towns to urban sprawl. Pendalton was the only place that didn't get dozed.

San Onofre isn't a nude beach anymore. Blacks is still there.

Check out the topos from the 70's... Small beach towns, not farking condos everywhere.
 
2013-11-13 02:13:41 AM  

ciberido: pyrotek85: Shostie: America is literally HUGE.

I think a lot of Americans don't quite comprehend how massive this country really is.

I've seen this observation in other articles too, and I'm always surprised by it. Now I haven't personally traveled all over the country, but I have looked at maps and globes that show states/countries to scale to each other. Doesn't everyone else learn this in school at some point?

Whenever I would show a Nepali a map of Asia (or a globe), they would be amazed at how small Nepal was compared to other Asian countries such as China or India.  To be fair, India and China are both pretty big countries, but still, I was surprised at how surprised they were.

Conversely, they didn't seem all that surprised to see how big the USA was.

The again, a Nepali man once asked me which bus he would take to get to America.  Well, it's a landlocked country.  I'm not sure the man knew what an ocean was.


Well I wouldn't blame him for not knowing, not everyone has access to the same amount of schooling as everyone else does unfortunately. I'm just surprised that tourists visiting from other first world countries are ignorant of something I thought be common knowledge to them. I mean, the size and scope of the world and it's countries is pretty basic wouldn't you think?
 
2013-11-13 02:16:42 AM  

MrSteve007: A while back, there was a police crackdown on jaywalkers in Seattle,


Proud recipient of one of these tickets. Shortly thereafter I got shat on by a pigeon while waiting on a light for no reason lol

But yeah even before that Seattleites had a well-deserved reputation as being the only mofos on Earth that would wait for a light at 2 am when there was no traffic on either of the streets they were trying to cross
 
2013-11-13 02:16:47 AM  

spaten: davidphogan: kombi: Up till about 20is years ago there was still green belt (non built up areas) between LA and San Diego. Not it seems like Sd to SF is one big city.

When did Camp Pendleton get bulldozed, and how the hell did LA and SF get connected by sprawl?

During the 1980's to the 2000's. Was on the front lines of it North County San Diego went from beach towns to urban sprawl. Pendalton was the only place that didn't get dozed.

San Onofre isn't a nude beach anymore. Blacks is still there.

Check out the topos from the 70's... Small beach towns, not farking condos everywhere.


The 70's were a lot more than 20 years ago.
 
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