Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Thought Catalog)   Sixteen non-Americans talk about the things they couldn't or wouldn't believe about America before living there. The common denominator: Serving sizes   (thoughtcatalog.com) divider line 407
    More: Interesting, Americans, serving sizes, Harris Teeter, Guyana, SSI, border checkpoints, Kit Kats, American Foreign Policy  
•       •       •

21586 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Nov 2013 at 11:12 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



407 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-11-13 12:11:14 AM  
So basically American culture is better than your culture in every way, and we can outeat your asses.  YEAH AMERICA.
 
2013-11-13 12:11:49 AM  
Friendly cashiers are a feature now - WTF?
 
2013-11-13 12:13:41 AM  

9Speed: Shostie: America is literally HUGE.

I think a lot of Americans don't quite comprehend how massive this country really is.

A few months ago I had a long-time friend fly in from Denmark to stay with me for a week.  He had already planned out an itinerary for all the places he wanted to drive to...

Mon he arrived in Ft Lauderdale.
Tues he thought it would be fun to drive to Washington DC.
Weds we're going to see the arch in St Louis
Thurs let's hike the Grand Canyon in the morning and then go to Disneyland in the afternoon
Fri drive back to FL
etc.


I've found this map to be a useful visual aid for that sort of thing.

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-11-13 12:14:02 AM  

Coming on a Bicycle: Friendly cashiers are a feature now - WTF?


Well, granted plenty of the supposedly friendly places have a tip jar... friendly cashier, or GOLD-DIGGING SLUT?
 
2013-11-13 12:14:13 AM  

CygnusDarius: thisispete: I'm a New Zealander who has spent a grand total of two weeks in the United States. In 2011 I was sent to a conference in Milwaukee and I extended the trip with a week's holiday in Chicago. I was there when Osama bin Laden was killed. Which was interesting. Had I just stuck with websites or CNN, I would have thought there would be general rejoicing in the streets, but being there people just took it in their stride.

A little bit off-topic, but I don't care.

As a Mexican... I hope New Zealand wins this next soccer match. Our country doesn't deserve to enter the World Cup, and we as a nation should be concerned with more pressing matters than sports.

Now, back on topic... The one thing that surprises me about Americans is their sheer love of huge drinking cups, although the term 'cup' should not be applied; bucket fits the description far better.


I think if Mexico farks it up, the entire Mexican economy is going to lose about $800M or so. Also, if they do, there might be a revolt and they burn FMF to the ground. That's not good, b/c then they might get a competent federation that uses the talent wisely, which would be a farking nightmare for the US.
 
2013-11-13 12:15:32 AM  

CygnusDarius: thisispete: I'm a New Zealander who has spent a grand total of two weeks in the United States. In 2011 I was sent to a conference in Milwaukee and I extended the trip with a week's holiday in Chicago. I was there when Osama bin Laden was killed. Which was interesting. Had I just stuck with websites or CNN, I would have thought there would be general rejoicing in the streets, but being there people just took it in their stride.

A little bit off-topic, but I don't care.

As a Mexican... I hope New Zealand wins this next soccer match. Our country doesn't deserve to enter the World Cup, and we as a nation should be concerned with more pressing matters than sports.

Now, back on topic... The one thing that surprises me about Americans is their sheer love of huge drinking cups, although the term 'cup' should not be applied; bucket fits the description far better.




We're hoping for a repeat of 1980. NZ soccer is enjoying a lot of growth now and win or lose, even our share in the gate takings will do a lot of good for the sport here.
 
2013-11-13 12:15:42 AM  

Silverstaff: I pay my rent by electronic transfer. I am paid by direct deposit. I pay all my bills online through electronic transfers. All this talk about paper checks is kinda strange to me, and I've lived in the USA my entire life. Paper checks have been fading rapidly from prominence over the last decade or so.


They're still around more than elsewhere.  I pay rent with paper because there's a fee to direct deposit.  There are a lot of people who don't have a bank cashing in their paper work check at places like Wally World.  The only way I can do car registration by mail is with a paper check or money order.
 
2013-11-13 12:15:45 AM  

Fish in a Barrel: Erik_Emune: Completely bizarre to this Dane. The idea of an employer going through the rigamarole of printing checks rather than get a bank account number and doing direct transfer is positively 1950s.

As an American, I'm surprised checks came up at all.  About the only time I see a check is for large transfers:  buying a car, renovating the kitchen, etc.  Everything else is direct debit/deposit or credit card.  I'm honestly curious where these folks are coming across checks so often that it would make an impression.


I work for a small non-profit, and apparently it's too much of a biatch to do direct deposit.  But I just get my paycheck handed to me at work.

The BF works for a local business that *insists* on direct deposit... but he still gets a fake paycheck mailed every two weeks showing how much they direct deposited in his account.

/shrug
//I prefer checks over debit cards myself; credit is different
 
2013-11-13 12:16:41 AM  
As a Mexican, I have two obvious disadvantages: One, being brown-skinned, and second, my closest neighbor is Arizona. That being said, however, there's only been two or three times I've faced actual discrimination, but all in all, it has been either good, or initially hesitant, but switched off to good (maybe because my tendency in the US is to speak English in first, ask questions later).

However, it's been a while since I've been in the US (four or five years), so I don't know how are things.
 
2013-11-13 12:18:00 AM  
If you can't tell by my user name I have had the privilege to travel a great deal for both work and play and here are my impressions of America coming back to it one more than one occasion after extended time away.

Good:

(1) More often than not, Americans are honest. There is very little corruption here compared to what one finds in many countries.
(2) There is a real tradition of public service that many countries simply do not have. In many places being in government is a way to get rich.
(3) America is clean. This is the number on thing that always aggravates me when I travel to the 3rd world, just how god damn dirty it is.

The bad:

(1) Americans tradition of public service is lessened by our interpersonal shallowness and even stinginess. I thought the man from Africa in the article got it exactly right. We get outraged when the bureaucrat in Washington is found with his hand in the till but we would never trust our neighbor or the guy down the road. Everyone wants a government handout but rarely lends a helping hand.
(2) We are paranoid about what happens to children in "the village". Childhood is such a confining experience in America. I didn't really notice this so much when i was younger but now I see it clearly: we train our children from a young age. Unlike the guy in the article who was "jealous" about the speaking abilities of a seven year old, I think it is a sickness.
(3) Our need for entertainment, and yes this includes Fark. We fight and argue over the most inane things and I do not think many people realize what a luxury that is. In many places wars are fought over simply who gets to eat. Here, we have huge debates over school prayer or flag burning. Ridiculous.

Just some things that pop into my head.
 
TWX
2013-11-13 12:18:04 AM  

forgotmydamnusername: theorellior: Triumph: Americans wouldn't be so fat if the beer and chocolate were as good as in Europe.

Oh, please. I would say that the selection of beer I can get in the liquor stores within a mile of my house rivals or surpasses anything in Europe. The craft beer revolution has paid many, many dividends to the discerning beer drinker. It's a wonderful time to be an American beer snob.

If you're talking about the liquor store down the street from my house, yeah. If you're talking about the one 3 blocks from my dad's house in Phoenix, they've got one product from one halfway decent local brewery, and everything else is farkin' Crudweiser and Coors.


What the-hell part of town is he in?

I've got a good selection at Sprouts, at Basha's, and at Trader Joe's all within a mile or two of home. Even the local Fry's isn't all that bad.
 
2013-11-13 12:18:51 AM  

ReapTheChaos: Roman Fyseek: fusillade762: Our cars and houses are ridiculous in size.

There's some house-hunter reality TV show on Discovery or Travel or whatever and they took some Americans to the UK to house-hunt.  It was pretty hilarious because the Americans were looking for a flat about 30 times as large as whatever the realtor was showing them.

That was the only part I didn't like when I lived over there. The first house we lived in, the master bedroom was barely big enough for a full size bed, with it shoved up tight against one wall, there was about two foot of space on the other side and the end. Also they never heard of a damn closet! This wasn't even an old house, it was only a year old when we moved in.


The limeys have some weird closet tax or something, iirc. At any rate, they use armoires at an amazing rate. I guess that is what happens when your nation is the size of a middling American state.
 
2013-11-13 12:19:02 AM  

Silverstaff: I pay my rent by electronic transfer. I am paid by direct deposit. I pay all my bills online through electronic transfers. All this talk about paper checks is kinda strange to me, and I've lived in the USA my entire life. Paper checks have been fading rapidly from prominence over the last decade or so.


Guess what? Chances are those are not electronic transfers. They're done over the web, but what comes out is a little printed out check stuck in the mail that you just don't see.

Also, unless you're working for a pretty big company, direct deposit is rare. And, I've never heard of paying rent by electronic transfer (unless again, it's one of those BillPay things where a check is printed and mailed behind the scenes).
 
2013-11-13 12:19:27 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: flucto: Interesting. Even moving back to the US after a couple of years triggers some of these observations. Wait, I can buy milk, on Sunday, at 9pm, in 200 places? In gallons? For $3??? And the cashier is nice? And wishes me a blessed day? WHATTHEIDONTEVEN

I was surprised how many people thought that friendly cashiers was odd.  I didn't realize that was anything special.


In college I was pretty good friends with a Japanese student.  One time when we went shopping together the cashier was more friendly than usual and we struck up a brief conversation about what my major was.  After we left the store my friend complained about how "rude" the cashier had been.  I didn't understand what she was talking about at first, but she explained how (in her view) the fact that the cashier had asked my questions about my college major was terribly rude.

It was kind of an eye-opening experience because until then I had always assumed that "politeness" was a one-dimensional thing, and that Japanese were simply "more polite" than Americans.  Before then it had never occurred to me that something which was considered rude in one culture might be considered polite in another, and vice-versa.
 
2013-11-13 12:19:36 AM  

9Speed: Shostie: America is literally HUGE.

I think a lot of Americans don't quite comprehend how massive this country really is.

A few months ago I had a long-time friend fly in from Denmark to stay with me for a week.  He had already planned out an itinerary for all the places he wanted to drive to...

Mon he arrived in Ft Lauderdale.
Tues he thought it would be fun to drive to Washington DC.
Weds we're going to see the arch in St Louis
Thurs let's hike the Grand Canyon in the morning and then go to Disneyland in the afternoon
Fri drive back to FL
etc.


You get that from people just visiting Florida and don't realize just how big even this state is. My favorite overheard comment was at the Tampa Airport once, where you can see the Tampa skyline a little bit in the distance. The guy at the table next to me asked his waiter, "Is that Orlando?"
 
2013-11-13 12:20:11 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: ReapTheChaos: "Wall-to-wall carpeting. The absolutely needless luxury is both profoundly wasteful and absurd. Not to mention hard to clean."

Well you don't really need to clean a dirt floor, so I guess they have a point about cleaning, but really carpeting is pretty much the same price as wood or ceramic tile flooring and I think vacuuming is way easier than mopping. I guess they think we should just walk around on the bare cement or wood subfloor.


I'll take tile over carpet any day. If you spill something there's no stains to worry about, it's cooler on the feet, and if you sweep up semi-regularly you rarely need to mop.


It's below freezing outside.  I really don't need my feet to be any cooler, thanks.

I prefer wood floors with strategic area rugs myself, but grew up with / currently have carpet everywhere 'cept the bathroom, kitchen, dining room, basement, and entryway.  Which really should be the only places you need to worry about spilling stuff that'll stain anyway.
 
2013-11-13 12:20:19 AM  

I_Am_Weasel: Portion size and gravy on everything.


...and/or ketchup.

/or "catsup"
//whatever
 
2013-11-13 12:20:53 AM  

Trocadero: I think if Mexico farks it up, the entire Mexican economy is going to lose about $800M or so. Also, if they do, there might be a revolt and they burn FMF to the ground. That's not good, b/c then they might get a competent federation that uses the talent wisely, which would be a farking nightmare for the US.


If Mexico farks it up, getting a new soccer federation is the least of my concerns, and the concerns of many (lots of crap going on nationwide). But, I would like it if Mexico left the CONCACAF and went south to get more pressure in having better players. Or, face the US more frequently, since Americans are getting good at soccer.

thisispete:  We're hoping for a repeat of 1980. NZ soccer is enjoying a lot of growth now and win or lose, even our share in the gate takings will do a lot of good for the sport here.

Here's hoping for a healthy growth in the sport. The more the merrier I say :).
 
2013-11-13 12:21:13 AM  

worlddan: (1) More often than not, Americans are honest. There is very little corruption here compared to what one finds in many countries.
(2) There is a real tradition of public service that many countries simply do not have. In many places being in government is a way to get rich.


Ever been to Illinois?
 
2013-11-13 12:22:26 AM  

Confabulat: Some of their bafflement that Americans actually take religion and patriotism seriously is well shared by me.


I was someone surprised to learn how casually most South Americans accept the Theory of Evolution.  There's such an association in the USA between being Christian and belief and Creationism that I forget the two aren't so strongly associated in other countries.  And yes, I know that the Catholic Church is ok with evolution, but it still surprised me somehow.
 
2013-11-13 12:23:29 AM  
The[y] couldn't believe that we like Root Beer.

upload.wikimedia.org
It's so bubbly and cloying, and happy...
 
2013-11-13 12:23:29 AM  
I've lived in Germany for a few years from what my German friends have told me:
Wooden houses. In Germany you only build a house out of wood if you are poor or trying to make some sort of environmental statement
.

Germans don't know about earthquakes, apparently.

Ooo! Want your house to last forever and be swanky, build it with unreinforced stone walls or masonry!  Not wooden framing!
 
2013-11-13 12:24:42 AM  

gunslinger_RG: Also, we should really have some documentation for newcomers on our tipping etiquette. Since I grew up here, I forget how complex this totally unwritten and nearly unspoken rule is to someone who has not grown up in that environment. I dated this lady from China for a few years and I had to teach her how/when/why to tip. Restaurants are the easiest to pick up, but the stylist, the cab, the person who cleans your house.


I was born in the USA and lived here all my life and cannot figure out the tipping system. It's truly mind boggling.
 
2013-11-13 12:24:54 AM  
When I have relatives from Europe visit, they are almost always astonished by how big everything is.   Most were dumbstruck to find out that New York is a large state and not just Manhattan Island.  Last few times I had fun farking with them.  I'd ask them where they wanted to go (I'm in Jersey).   They'd reply, "New York!".  I'd drive them over to Staten Island.  They'd sit there in the car looking at each other and then sheepishly ask, "Where are we?"   I'd say, "New York.  You said you wanted to go to New York."  They'd work up some courage and say, "But we wanted to go to New York City."   I'd reply, "You are in New York City."   They'd look around and point across the bay, "We want to go over there.", pointing to Manhattan.  I'd say, "Manhattan?  Why didn't you say so?"  They had no idea NYC was made up of 5 boroughs.
 
2013-11-13 12:25:16 AM  

LemSkroob: What is most interesting is the responses people have based on the area of the US they visited.


And where they are from within their own countries and how much they have traveled. Western Europe shouldn't really be surprised by much (except for Health care and transportation). German hotels have buffet breakfasts, and their dinners in Germany can be enormous too. Some of the "schwein" dinners must be half a pig.
 
2013-11-13 12:25:52 AM  

CygnusDarius: As a Mexican, I have two obvious disadvantages: One, being brown-skinned, and second, my closest neighbor is Arizona. That being said, however, there's only been two or three times I've faced actual discrimination, but all in all, it has been either good, or initially hesitant, but switched off to good (maybe because my tendency in the US is to speak English in first, ask questions later).

However, it's been a while since I've been in the US (four or five years), so I don't know how are things.


Oh, they're going okay, I suppose.  The government shut down for awhile, but everybody forgot and now we're debating about stores being open on Thanksgiving because actual holidays where non-essential workers get a chance to rest sounds vaguely socialist.  How are things in Mexico?
 
2013-11-13 12:26:28 AM  
worlddan:


(1) More often than not, Americans are honest. There is very little corruption here compared to what one finds in many countries.

(3) America is clean. This is the number on thing that always aggravates me when I travel to the 3rd world, just how god damn dirty it is.

1) My Bulgarian co worker was actually astounded that you couldn't bribe cops.  I don't suppose he ever tried, and I guess he was more thankful for it, than disappointed.

3) Scotland and England are farking filthy places.  I couldn't believe the actual amount of litter in the streets.  WTF people, there are trash cans on every corner?  However, the Tube in London was spotless.
Germany, the streets and public transport are spotless.  Paris, was somewhat dirty, but was swept clean every morning.
 
2013-11-13 12:26:35 AM  
One thing I noticed that no one mentioned was advertising.  In the states, it's a constant bombardment everywhere, anytime.  Being overseas for a while you get used to not being pestered so much and, in some countries, it is so lacking you almost miss it.
When you come back, it is a shock to the system how much you are targeted by ads, commercials, billboards, everywhere you look, everything you hear, has some percentage of advertising associated with it.  It tends to desensitize you, yet, it also seems like it's that chatty friend you have that never shuts up.
 
2013-11-13 12:27:14 AM  

Fark It: worlddan: (1) More often than not, Americans are honest. There is very little corruption here compared to what one finds in many countries.
(2) There is a real tradition of public service that many countries simply do not have. In many places being in government is a way to get rich.

Ever been to Illinois?


Ever been to India?
 
2013-11-13 12:27:46 AM  
What the hell is a bank check and why the hell is it a problem for so many people?
 
2013-11-13 12:27:51 AM  

thisisyourbrainonFark: Fano: This was an interesting discussion on quora a couple weeks back.

One great point, corroborated by my wife, was that Americans are superficially friendly and overshare everything. In the course of an elevator ride an American woman might talk about her abortion and the particulars of how her marriage failed. The sorts of things you might confide only in a close friend about. This often leads foreigners to think that they have instantly made a friend for life. This can lead to disappointment when they find out that we would share that stuff with just anybody.

You really think that's a great point of emphasis that emphatically demonstrates Americans? Lol!

Also, here's some oversharing of Americana

[cdn01.dailycaller.com image 850x364]


I exaggerated for effect but yes.

you are a puppet: I do remember a Nigerian friend expounding on this by asking me, "If I woke you up in the middle of the night and asked you to come with me, what would you say?"
"I'd ask what was going on..."
"You see," he said. "My friends from my village would come with me, and on the way would ask, 'Ade, where are we going?'"


A lot of Americans are perfectly comfortable sharing personal things with complete strangers, without the part of being close friends. This causes confusion for foreigners who think the person has become a true friend.
 
2013-11-13 12:28:07 AM  
1.  People don't really care where your money came from - as long as you're rich and not currently involved in a high speed chase
2.  People actually watch reality TV series
3.  What passes for culture is based entirely on the spending habits of 15 year old girls
4.  Most women dress like whores - even those who have little or no claim to the title
5.  It important to have as big a house as possible - it saves trips to Goodwill
6.  You definitely need an SUV - you never know when you might take the wrong off-ramp and end up on top of Pikes Peak
7.  In America, architecture isn't an art - it's an affliction

...and don't even get me started on Canada
 
2013-11-13 12:28:09 AM  
FTFA: "They also assumed that you could run into ultra famous people, like, in the open market or on the bus"


True story:

I was once working as a lift operator at a ski resort.  Those resorts have a lot of foreign transplants from the southern hemisphere--folks who follow winters and work ski service year round.  So one day I'm sitting at the bottom end of my lift helping guests and such when a group of eight black guys come cruising through.  (This wouldn't be notable anywhere else, but I mean, it's mostly true: not a lot of black people ski or snowboard.)  So I greet them, help them onto the lift, continue what I'm doing.  One of the guys looked vaguely familiar with his baby dreads, but I didn't think much of it.  So it gets to the point where I need to swap spots with the Bolivian guy who was working the top spot of the lift.  I ride up to the top and the first thing he says (which is the most English I got out of him the whole season): "Holy shiat, man.  You see Coolio?!"

Made me laugh that the first big celebrity I'd ever met, I didn't even recognize, but the guy from La Paz was all over it.
 
2013-11-13 12:28:50 AM  

Fano: This was an interesting discussion on quora a couple weeks back.

One great point, corroborated by my wife, was that Americans are superficially friendly and overshare everything. In the course of an elevator ride an American woman might talk about her abortion and the particulars of how her marriage failed. The sorts of things you might confide only in a close friend about. This often leads foreigners to think that they have instantly made a friend for life. This can lead to disappointment when they find out that we would share that stuff with just anybody.


Nah, who are we kidding with these overly complicated analysis?

Why would someone want to befriend a foreigner who has limited resources and skills? An American would get nothing out of befriending a foreigner.

If the foreigner had mad skillz or lots of money, then that's another story.

The foreigners just haven't adjusted to their social rank yet. They may have been top dog in their country that would have been very beneficial to befriend, but in America they have to start at the bottom of the ladder.

Of course, western Europe immigrants have the least disadvantage, then eastern Europe and then the third worlders.
 
2013-11-13 12:29:06 AM  
The obsession with fitness contrasted with the number of fat people is definitely something that has boggled my mind forever as well.

Also yes, American mass-market brand chocolate for the most part sucks.  Cheap chocolate from Japan is way better (it's made like the European stuff, far more smooth).

Also EVERYTHING being so damn oversweetened.

And yes, the slow banking.  I'm surprised that electronic bank transfer hasn't caught on more - on the other hand, I am still happy to pay my normal monthly bills with paper bank checks sent via USPS, so YMMV I guess.
 
2013-11-13 12:30:00 AM  

CygnusDarius: As a Mexican, I have two obvious disadvantages: One, being brown-skinned, and second, my closest neighbor is Arizona. That being said, however, there's only been two or three times I've faced actual discrimination, but all in all, it has been either good, or initially hesitant, but switched off to good (maybe because my tendency in the US is to speak English in first, ask questions later).

However, it's been a while since I've been in the US (four or five years), so I don't know how are things.


I like Mexicans. The ones I've dealt with are usually very friendly and have a very high work ethic.

Other Latin Americans, though, seem to all hate, really *hate* Mexicans. Have you noticed that?
 
2013-11-13 12:30:30 AM  

9Speed: Mon he arrived in Ft Lauderdale.
Tues he thought it would be fun to drive to Washington DC.
Weds we're going to see the arch in St Louis
Thurs let's hike the Grand Canyon in the morning and then go to Disneyland in the afternoon
Fri drive back to FL
etc.


A friend had relatives visit from Ireland a few years ago. They planned to fly into New York City, rent a car, and drive to San Francisco. They told him they'd be ready for lunch when they got to Denver and wanted to know if he'd join them.
 
2013-11-13 12:30:56 AM  
Yes we have a very large geographically deserve country. And We dont have a great public trans portion system. Again geographically deserve and the size. So we usually have larger cars with larger engines. Go drive the 15 thru the California desert in a 1.2-2.0 liter. not a great trip. And it may sound counter intuitive but, in a non flat place like LA. You can get better mileage with a slightly larger engine.

Food. We do eat to much. But oh we can afford it in this country. One thing people from other country's dont understand is we dont have Vat's or any import tax on alot of food. So its cheaper.

We also make more money. So we can buy more than a 1 liter. Does not mean we have to.

Chocolate does suck here. But we are used to it and like it. Thats one of our cultural things.

We like big houses and land. We really dont like to live on top of each other.
The houses look alike because they are housing tracts. Not custom built. or one offs.

We eat alot of beef because we have room. Alot of country dont have the room to raise them and graze them.

We dont walk as much as we should. Im sorry but to go to work I would have to walk 7 miles each way. Same to go to the store. When I lived closer to the store and college I did walk or ride. But in most cases people here have some type of commute.

Traffic. Unfortunately the city I live in has not learned this. But round abouts are a waist of time and cause more problems than they solve. We learn how to drive here. The police really dont have much to worry about here. Not like other country's. Where the police could be walking into an armed camp. So what do they do? write tickets. so we learn how to drive quick.

Guns,Guns, Guns. We love our guns. I love my guns. Its ingrained in our way of life. And im sorry but I hate it when people think they can just buy a gun without a background check or anything. Even in private gun sales your are so pose to go to a gun shop fill out the paper work and transfer the gun. People that dont are breaking the law. In the past I have purchased 2 guns and a riffle from gun shows. And had background checks with each one.
 
2013-11-13 12:31:34 AM  

Fark It: worlddan: (1) More often than not, Americans are honest. There is very little corruption here compared to what one finds in many countries.
(2) There is a real tradition of public service that many countries simply do not have. In many places being in government is a way to get rich.

Ever been to Illinois?


You haven't been to a nation that totally runs on baksheesh. Imagine if you had to give bribes every time you went to the DMV, or the public library, for cops to come, or basically everything.
 
2013-11-13 12:31:57 AM  

trippdogg: 1.  People don't really care where your money came from - as long as you're rich and not currently involved in a high speed chase
2.  People actually watch reality TV series
3.  What passes for culture is based entirely on the spending habits of 15 year old girls
4.  Most women dress like whores - even those who have little or no claim to the title
5.  It important to have as big a house as possible - it saves trips to Goodwill
6.  You definitely need an SUV - you never know when you might take the wrong off-ramp and end up on top of Pikes Peak
7.  In America, architecture isn't an art - it's an affliction

...and don't even get me started on Canada


#2 not if we kill everyone that does, and then we may get something worth watching on tv
 
2013-11-13 12:32:43 AM  
FTA: Yes, they'd meet with a lot of friendliness and amicable treatment, but there was a bit of cold water splashed in their faces as they assumed it was the beginning of a real friendship, and they'd seek the person out for activities, interaction, etc. A lot of Korean, Japanese, West African, and Middle Eastern folks said the same things: they thought they were making friends but they turned out to be arms-length acquaintances. Several expressed that they started to feel that the initial friendliness was phony or superficial. Fortunately, not all of their relationships went this way, and they often met great new real friends.

Niko, it's your cousin! Why don't you take me bowling...
 
2013-11-13 12:33:53 AM  
Man as an Australian they've started selling yankie Chocolate in some supermarkets here the one about the quality of the chocolate really hit me.

You guys eat that stuff... like by choice?
Like a block of Hershies chocolate is the equivilent of the cheapest, nastiest fark off chocolate you can buy. It's just foul.
 
2013-11-13 12:34:00 AM  

GRCooper: CygnusDarius: As a Mexican, I have two obvious disadvantages: One, being brown-skinned, and second, my closest neighbor is Arizona. That being said, however, there's only been two or three times I've faced actual discrimination, but all in all, it has been either good, or initially hesitant, but switched off to good (maybe because my tendency in the US is to speak English in first, ask questions later).

However, it's been a while since I've been in the US (four or five years), so I don't know how are things.

I like Mexicans. The ones I've dealt with are usually very friendly and have a very high work ethic.

Other Latin Americans, though, seem to all hate, really *hate* Mexicans. Have you noticed that?


I did soccer radio and yes they HATE Mexicans. I mean HATE. Its hard to explain to people.
 
2013-11-13 12:34:11 AM  
worlddan:
(3) Our need for entertainment, and yes this includes Fark. We fight and argue over the most inane things and I do not think many people realize what a luxury that is. In many places wars are fought over simply who gets to eat. Here, we have huge debates over school prayer or flag burning. Ridiculous.


lol, i guess some people like to argue...and any "discussion" where everyone agrees is pretty useless imo.
i like to take whatever side seems under-represented, regardless of my own opinion, because it helps to see it from both sides,

in any case, this luxury of time (we don't have to look for food or shelter) is why we have things like art and music....and perhaps unfortunately, things like religion.
 
2013-11-13 12:34:59 AM  
Rincewind53:  I've always loved that cover.

Steinberg came to hate it. It came from a series he did. And seeing it ripped off and taken out of context really bothered him. But it really became iconic in a way no one foresaw.
 
2013-11-13 12:36:02 AM  

DamnYankees: The other one, which is also an inverse of one mentioned in the article, is the observation that the types of food we eat in the US is very narrow. If you go to a restaurant, you will pretty much only have beef, pork, chicken or a few basic fishes, and none of which will ever come with bones (or, god forbid, whole). This is a very US-thing, I think.


It's like choices in the USA are very wide but shallow.  It's hard to explain without examples.  I am very fond of a kind of snack called Bombay Mix.  When I got back to the States after living in Nepal, I went to a supermarket and was blown away by all the different things, but after looking around a while I was a little disappointed by how few choices there really were.  You can choose from eight different varieties of sour cream and onion potato chips, say, but you won't find Bombay mix (outside of a market that specializes in Indian food).

I guess more generally, it's like, if you want some specific food item that's popular in the USA, you'll find 17 varieties of it, but if you want something that isn't already quite popular, you'll find 0.  I wish more often, instead of being 17 versus 0, it could be, say, 15 versus 2

It's just a bit surprising how many different kinds of food there are that you simply cannot find in the USA unless you really go looking for it.
 
2013-11-13 12:37:51 AM  
Notabunny
fta Majority of high and middle schools have sport facilities of very high, almost professional quality.

Didn't go to a college game, huh?


CSB:
Here in Germany nobody knew when our high school's $whateverSports team played matches against other schools.
Being on a school team was just a random extra curricular activity like singing in the choir or participating in the chess or theater club.

When we made it to something like the final tournament for the state soccer championship, the only people outside the team who knew about it were close friends who wondered why we weren't in school for two days.
One time for a district qualifier play-off, my teacher and some other students were pissed because a couple of us got permission to skip the last 45-minute period of the day so that we could make it to the pitch just in time for kick-off.
I think once in seven years the student paper actually mentioned a game: the graduating class was playing against the teachers for fun and someone in their year who was on the newspaper team wrote a mocking paragraph about it.

To translate this for Americans: being quarterback of your high school's football team is something to get teased about and could get you labeled as the biggest dork in school..that is, if anyone outside the team ever found out about it AND cared enough.
 
2013-11-13 12:38:27 AM  

GRCooper: CygnusDarius: As a Mexican, I have two obvious disadvantages: One, being brown-skinned, and second, my closest neighbor is Arizona. That being said, however, there's only been two or three times I've faced actual discrimination, but all in all, it has been either good, or initially hesitant, but switched off to good (maybe because my tendency in the US is to speak English in first, ask questions later).

However, it's been a while since I've been in the US (four or five years), so I don't know how are things.

I like Mexicans. The ones I've dealt with are usually very friendly and have a very high work ethic.

Other Latin Americans, though, seem to all hate, really *hate* Mexicans. Have you noticed that?


Yeah, this is a vibe I've gotten, since I've worked with Colombian and Peruvian clients back in my office days. The general consensus is that the rest of South America hates us is because:

1.- We're obnoxiously proud for no reason.
2.- Americans think that all other South American countries are similar to Mexico.

I've a few friends that have been in SA, and the say it's not really true, but, then again, there is a minority of Mexican-Americans that seem to hate the rest of us that live in Mexico.
 
2013-11-13 12:39:32 AM  

mr0x: Fano: This was an interesting discussion on quora a couple weeks back.

One great point, corroborated by my wife, was that Americans are superficially friendly and overshare everything. In the course of an elevator ride an American woman might talk about her abortion and the particulars of how her marriage failed. The sorts of things you might confide only in a close friend about. This often leads foreigners to think that they have instantly made a friend for life. This can lead to disappointment when they find out that we would share that stuff with just anybody.

Nah, who are we kidding with these overly complicated analysis?

Why would someone want to befriend a foreigner who has limited resources and skills? An American would get nothing out of befriending a foreigner.

If the foreigner had mad skillz or lots of money, then that's another story.

The foreigners just haven't adjusted to their social rank yet. They may have been top dog in their country that would have been very beneficial to befriend, but in America they have to start at the bottom of the ladder.

Of course, western Europe immigrants have the least disadvantage, then eastern Europe and then the third worlders.


I think thats what we dont understand here. Now this is going to bug people but we really dont have a class system like they do in other countries. They really do. You are born poor. You stay poor. You dont go to school. Your dad pounds rock on the road you do too. Its difficult go get out of your class in alot of countries. You where born in the slums. You die in the slums.
 
2013-11-13 12:40:00 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: The[y] couldn't believe that we like Root Beer.

Heh. I took a big bottle of Dr. Pepper and a bottle of A&W root beer to some friends in Santiago. The look on their faces when they tasted it was awesome.

"Sabe a jarabe antitusivo." ("It tastes like cough syrup.") They couldn't believe that some people prefer those drinks to Coke or Sprite.


I hate Dr. Pepper. My Mother included one in a C.A.R.E. package when I was an undergrad and I could not finish it. Poured it out. Yes, it does taste like cough syrup. Straight up, it tastes like the juice from a jar of marschino cherries.

Blah! Yuck! Phtooie! Phtoie! I also hate Cherry Cola and Cream Soda, the sickliest beverage in the world. I would happily drink a bottle of Robitussin over Cream Soda.

As a Canadian, I find a lot of the things that confuse and bemuse foreigners are famiiar and not at all suprising.

When I was a kid in the early 1970s, the size of American portions astounded me. I thought they were, as the old saying goes, digging their graves with their teeth. And that was just as the obesity epidemic was getting started. I hadn't even had McDonald's yet--and you remember perhaps back when the small fries, the hamburger and the small beverage were the normal McDonald meal for adults as well as small children.

If you could bring your 1970s self forward in time to present-day America, they'd be just as astonished (for better and for worse).

Remember when 8 ounce bottles for a dime replaced 6 ounce bottles of Coke for a nickel?

Remember when cupcakes were scarcely bigger than a doll's teacup?

Remember when restaurants used 9 inch or 10 inch plates instead of of 12 inch plates or 15 inch platters?

Do you remember when it was only reactonary Southern loonies you felt the Demmie-rat in the White House was a Red Chinese Commie (as they thought of Einsenhower before him, and Nixon after)? When the GOP had a moderate wing and liberal Republicans still? That was only about 15 years ago, by the way, not the 1970s.

The past is a foreign country. Imagine what the 1970s would think of you today. It would be just as astonished, bemused, scared, appalled and entertained as the neighbors are in India, Canada, Germany, Sweden or Cuba.
 
Displayed 50 of 407 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report