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(USA Today)   If you participated in a fun run alongside a guy in a tuxedo and someone in a gorilla costume, the NCAA would like a word with you   (ftw.usatoday.com) divider line 29
    More: Asinine, NCAA, fun runs, gorillas  
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2093 clicks; posted to Sports » on 12 Nov 2013 at 1:36 PM (34 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



29 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-11-12 01:27:41 PM
I for one, am relieved to know that the ever-watchful NCAA is out there to ensure the purity of the student athlete.  God Bless them.
 
2013-11-12 01:40:58 PM
That is absolutely ridiculous
 
2013-11-12 01:41:19 PM
While the NCAA's hypocrisy knows no bounds, their sanity is wandering around the back 40 somewhere, lost in the woods.
 
2013-11-12 01:41:43 PM
To follow up: this is basically saying it is better to lie and hope you don't get caught instead of doing the honest thing and talking about running beside someone in a gorilla suit.
 
2013-11-12 01:45:51 PM

Babwa Wawa: I for one, am relieved to know that the ever-watchful NCAA is out there to ensure the purity of the student athlete.  God Bless them.


Extremism in defense of amateurism is no vice.
 
2013-11-12 01:52:48 PM
Anyone have any details on why? Was he paid for that run? Is there some rule specifically against costumes?
 
2013-11-12 01:53:14 PM
This article tells you nothing.

This article actually says why he was suspended. SPOILER ALERT: Typical enforcement dumbasses.
 
2013-11-12 02:04:54 PM
True story: My wife coaches cross country at her high school. One of her kids made CIF (state prelims more or less). He wanted to run in a 10k event last weekend, but it was considered a competitive event during his season so he couldn't.

If you are a college athlete, you've been around your sport long enough to know you can't do this stuff.

Of course, after RTFA, the kid wasn't in season or any of that crap. Technically, he wasn't even really in school since he was on his mission. Hell, it seems like he decided to bandit the race and wasn't even an official competitor.

Good job NCAA!
 
2013-11-12 02:09:30 PM
That's total bullshiat. I ran a few fun runs during the years I competed collegiately. I had no idea you couldn't even run in them, I just thought I couldn't accept prize money/trophies. The NCAA sucks.

I can only imagine there would have been no consequences had he played D1 football or basketball.
 
2013-11-12 02:18:22 PM

Marcus Aurelius: While the NCAA's hypocrisy knows no bounds, their sanity is wandering around the back 40 somewhere, lost in the woods.


That's very wrong.  The NCAA is perfectly sane.

You tell me how they're supposed to make money off of an athlete (and a track athlete at that) who participates in a fun run?  Is it insane to assume that everything a student athlete does must generate cash for the NCAA?
 
2013-11-12 02:19:17 PM
It's the kid's fault for not enrolling at an SEC school.
 
2013-11-12 02:32:22 PM

SirGeorgeBurkelwitzIII: That's total bullshiat. I ran a few fun runs during the years I competed collegiately. I had no idea you couldn't even run in them, I just thought I couldn't accept prize money/trophies. The NCAA sucks.

I can only imagine there would have been no consequences had he played D1 football or basketball.


You can if you're competing for NCAA that year.  If you're not competing for NCAA but you "compete" elsewhere during that year, you lose a year of eligibility.
 
2013-11-12 02:59:17 PM
Here is the problem.  If he played BYU football or basketball, he probably would have been fine. However he decided to participate in cross country and track which everyone knows has no monetary value for the NCAA.  Therefore violations that occur in non-revenue generating sports are hyper enforced so as to allow more lenient enforcement of the revenue generating sports because enforcement actions all evens out. This is how the NCAA operates so it can say it is enforcing rules across all sports.
 
2013-11-12 03:05:05 PM
The NCAA really needs a Vice President of Common Sense, or hell just a VP of PR to tell them when they're doing stupid stuff that's only going to hurt their cause.
 
2013-11-12 03:08:48 PM
Making 6 figures selling autographs- Slap on the wrist
Having Father sell your services to play football- Slap on the wrist
Participate in a fun run- lose a season's eligibility

Yeah, seems fair
 
2013-11-12 03:36:31 PM

ladodger34: True story: My wife coaches cross country at her high school. One of her kids made CIF (state prelims more or less). He wanted to run in a 10k event last weekend, but it was considered a competitive event during his season so he couldn't.

If you are a college athlete, you've been around your sport long enough to know you can't do this stuff.

Of course, after RTFA, the kid wasn't in season or any of that crap. Technically, he wasn't even really in school since he was on his mission. Hell, it seems like he decided to bandit the race and wasn't even an official competitor.

Good job NCAA!


I might buy the "you know better" if we were talking about professional athletes with contracts.  But these are college kids.
 
2013-11-12 03:49:41 PM
Ok I've read both articles, and may have missed it.  I was assuming that he had won prize money in a race and accepted it (even little races sometimes give cash to the winners).  But I see no mention of that, so I assume that isn't the case.   This just doesn't make any sense.
 
2013-11-12 03:55:14 PM
Should have enrolled at Da U ... The gorilla would have sprung for hookers and blow
 
2013-11-12 03:58:17 PM

OrangeSnapper: Ok I've read both articles, and may have missed it.  I was assuming that he had won prize money in a race and accepted it (even little races sometimes give cash to the winners).  But I see no mention of that, so I assume that isn't the case.   This just doesn't make any sense.


It wasn't clear to me either but here is my take:  The NCAA has a rule that if you don't immediately go from high school to college, you cannot partake in any event that increases your ability to perform in NCAA-level athletics, even if you don't get paid.  So in a legitimate application of this scenario, if I graduated high school and played minor league baseball for free for a year or two, that gives me an unfair advantage over other NCAA players once I go to college.  It still doesn't make a ton of sense but I can see why they do it-- it protects their monopoly on free labor and prevents anyone else from creating a league adopting the same business model.

In this kid's situation, they are basically arguing that running alongside gorilla-man gave him an extra edge against NCAA competition once he did enroll in school, and that's why he doesn't deserve four full years of eligibility.
 
2013-11-12 04:04:13 PM
balki1867:  It still doesn't make a ton of sense but I can see why they do it-- it protects their monopoly on free labor and prevents anyone else from creating a league adopting the same business model.

Thanks, now THIS makes sense.  The NCAA might be just a little bit more evil than I had given them credit for.
 
2013-11-12 04:58:11 PM

SirGeorgeBurkelwitzIII: That's total bullshiat. I ran a few fun runs during the years I competed collegiately. I had no idea you couldn't even run in them, I just thought I couldn't accept prize money/trophies. The NCAA sucks.

I can only imagine there would have been no consequences had he played D1 football or basketball.


Except that the same thing has happened to athletes in both sports over the last year.

http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/ncaaf-dr-saturday/ncaa-searches-low-de ny ing-marine-eligibility-173055162.html

http://www.ajc.com/weblogs/jeff-schultz/2013/nov/05/ncaa-strips-ex-c en tennial-player-year-eligibility-/


The reasoning behind the rule is as follows:

In order to make competition as fair as possible, they require an athlete to begin playing the year after they graduate high school, and take no more than 5 years of calendar time to use up their four seasons of eligibility.  There are (of course) exceptions.  Most commonly for athletes who delay their entry into college to go into the military, or who pause their college career to go on religious missions.  Those exceptions come with a price in that you may not compete in any organized games (they give you a uniform number, keep score, etc.) while your clock is stopped.  Why?  You aren't supposed to be using your "time off" as training and practice so you can come back to be a better player, but for the limited reasons they grant the exceptions.

It's a good rule.  But the absurdity comes from the NCAA's interpretation of what constitutes an organized game and there aren't really good guidelines.  Athletes are told to just stay away from anything that might be construed as organized play.  These guys didn't.
 
2013-11-12 07:03:53 PM

oh_please: This article tells you nothing.

This article actually says why he was suspended. SPOILER ALERT: Typical enforcement dumbasses.


So basically, if I'm on a break between high school and college and going to be on the track team and say "I'm going to run out to the store," there goes a year of eligibility.
 
2013-11-12 07:14:46 PM

mcmnky: oh_please: This article tells you nothing.

This article actually says why he was suspended. SPOILER ALERT: Typical enforcement dumbasses.

So basically, if I'm on a break between high school and college and going to be on the track team and say "I'm going to run out to the store," there goes a year of eligibility.


Well, as long as it's organized, then yeah. Watch out, monkey boy.
 
2013-11-12 08:21:03 PM
Just would like to throw a minor threadjack out to the Friars CC team, well represented in that pic.

\CC is our only team to ever win a National Championship
 
2013-11-12 10:19:35 PM
The NCAA sucks, plan and simple.  Football and basketball players get away with murder because that makes money, but heaven forbid you are in another sport because the NCAA has to show it is tough.

Jerry Tarkanian  was right, but it is squared when it comes to the non-revenue sports.
 
2013-11-12 10:37:09 PM

Bermuda59: Making 6 figures selling autographs- Slap on the wrist
Having Father sell your services to play football- Slap on the wrist
Participate in a fun run- lose a season's eligibility

Yeah, seems fair


You nailed it.
 
2013-11-12 10:48:09 PM
It's weird how we all refer to the NCAA as a hive-mind or living entity. Does anyone actually know anyone who works for them?
 
2013-11-13 02:50:34 AM
that's the only way i participate in a fun run
 
2013-11-13 12:36:12 PM

interstellar_tedium: The NCAA sucks, plan and simple.  Football and basketball players at a handful of schools get away with murder because that makes money, but heaven forbid you are at another school or in another sport because the NCAA has to show it is tough.


Jerry Tarkanian  was right, but it is squared when it comes to the non-revenue sports.

Fixed.
 
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