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(CTV News)   Typhoon Haiyan before/after pictures more of a "now you see it, now you don't"   (ctvnews.ca) divider line 59
    More: Sad, radiation damages  
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14964 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Nov 2013 at 1:44 PM (23 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-12 12:40:14 PM
You know what?  I love the idea that you can do this, but could they make at least some effort to match up the angles?   I'm presuming they are using Google Earth for the before images, and you can adjust the direction, angle, and zoom to match the "after" picture.

Oh, and the whole airport one is a massive fail:  The before image is looking straight down, and the after is at ground level, looking horizontally.
 
2013-11-12 01:07:19 PM

dittybopper: You know what?  I love the idea that you can do this, but could they make at least some effort to match up the angles?   I'm presuming they are using Google Earth for the before images, and you can adjust the direction, angle, and zoom to match the "after" picture.

Oh, and the whole airport one is a massive fail:  The before image is looking straight down, and the after is at ground level, looking horizontally.


came here to say something like this.
 
2013-11-12 01:47:32 PM
was playing "now you see it, now you don't" w/subbys mom last night ...so yeah
 
2013-11-12 01:49:32 PM
Wax on
Wax off
 
2013-11-12 01:50:09 PM
Does anybody know if buildings in the Philippines are built to any sort of building code?
 
2013-11-12 01:50:47 PM
Whats crazy is the second set with those huge tankers like 2 blocks from the water in the middle of the residential area that was by the docks. That couldn't have been a pleasant place to be when those came crashing up....
 
2013-11-12 01:50:47 PM
Just because you can build image sliders doesn't mean you should, since you don't have matching images.
 
2013-11-12 01:50:48 PM

ManateeGag: dittybopper: You know what?  I love the idea that you can do this, but could they make at least some effort to match up the angles?   I'm presuming they are using Google Earth for the before images, and you can adjust the direction, angle, and zoom to match the "after" picture.

Oh, and the whole airport one is a massive fail:  The before image is looking straight down, and the after is at ground level, looking horizontally.

came here to say something like this.


I was going to do a fund raise to help out but if they can't even be bothered to line up the images then why should I
 
2013-11-12 01:51:06 PM
If they gave these storms cuter names they wouldn't seem so depressing and terrible.....

Something like Typhoon Poopsie, or Hurricane Tinklepiddle would really cheer the survivors up!
 
2013-11-12 01:51:14 PM

Sin_City_Superhero: Does anybody know if buildings in the Philippines are built to any sort of building code?


Emelda Marcos shoe code

dittybopper: You know what?  I love the idea that you can do this, but could they make at least some effort to match up the angles?   I'm presuming they are using Google Earth for the before images, and you can adjust the direction, angle, and zoom to match the "after" picture.

Oh, and the whole airport one is a massive fail:  The before image is looking straight down, and the after is at ground level, looking horizontally.


THIS
 
2013-11-12 01:51:28 PM

Griftin Rubes: was playing "now you see it, now you don't" w/subbys mom last night ...so yeah


Which was also a national disaster.
 
2013-11-12 01:52:00 PM

Sin_City_Superhero: Does anybody know if buildings in the Philippines are built to any sort of building code?


news.bbc.co.uk
I'm going to go with 'no'.
 
2013-11-12 01:54:57 PM

ManateeGag: dittybopper: You know what?  I love the idea that you can do this, but could they make at least some effort to match up the angles?   I'm presuming they are using Google Earth for the before images, and you can adjust the direction, angle, and zoom to match the "after" picture.

Oh, and the whole airport one is a massive fail:  The before image is looking straight down, and the after is at ground level, looking horizontally.

came here to say something like this.


My thoughts as well.
 
2013-11-12 01:56:31 PM
10,000 dead.

www.creativecriminals.com

Where were you when the world stopped turning?
 
2013-11-12 01:56:41 PM
That's okay you coastal folks. You keep making fun of "flyover states". Meanwhile, here in Michigan we have no major earthquakes, no hurricanes, no typhoons, no tsunamis, no crazy annual wildfires, rare (almost non-existant) mudslides, extremely rare avalanches (and only in the mountains, which are few and far-between in Michigan), few deadly species of animals (wolves, pumas, rattlesnakes, black widows, brown recluses, and all are rarely seen in civilized areas), rare tornado touchdowns (and they're usually nowhere near as bad as in tornado alley), rare blizzards, and it's unlikely we'll be the target of a terrorist attack.

I'm happy living in one of the safest states. As long as I avoid Detroit's badlands, Flint, Saginaw City, and don't act like a dipshiat on the Great Lakes, I'm pretty secure here. Nature's kind to us up here. Our biggest threat is each other, and if you're in the right town that's not a problem.

That said, I do feel sorry for the people who suffered the mighty wrath of nature, but maybe that's nature's way of saying "don't live on the shoreline." We'll get more of that in America, too, and everyone will act like it's this big surprised when New York or Miami are destroyed in the big storm that is out there waiting for them, but those of us in "flyover states" know it's coming, and wish you all good luck in the days ahead. Mother Nature's a biatch, and she's been pretty pissed at coastal cities over the past decade or so.
 
2013-11-12 01:59:56 PM

dittybopper: You know what?  I love the idea that you can do this, but could they make at least some effort to match up the angles?   I'm presuming they are using Google Earth for the before images, and you can adjust the direction, angle, and zoom to match the "after" picture.

Oh, and the whole airport one is a massive fail:  The before image is looking straight down, and the after is at ground level, looking horizontally.


This.  I came here to say it.

Many points for effort.  -1000 points for actual execution.

In any case, it still paints a pretty horrifying vision of what an asshole Mother Nature can be.
 
2013-11-12 02:01:24 PM
Really, though... Nature sucks. F♥ck you, nature.
 
2013-11-12 02:03:10 PM
My god. It's horrific that the photographer and pilot of the surveying aircraft failed to consider the irritation they would cause to people sitting in intact buildings, drinking coffee that was not brewed with corpse-laden, cholera-infested seawater, by not taking into account Google satellite view angles when they were shooting these photos!
 
2013-11-12 02:03:35 PM

ZeroCorpse: That's okay you coastal folks. You keep making fun of "flyover states". Meanwhile, here in Michigan we have no major earthquakes, no hurricanes, no typhoons, no tsunamis, no crazy annual wildfires, rare (almost non-existant) mudslides, extremely rare avalanches (and only in the mountains, which are few and far-between in Michigan), few deadly species of animals (wolves, pumas, rattlesnakes, black widows, brown recluses, and all are rarely seen in civilized areas), rare tornado touchdowns (and they're usually nowhere near as bad as in tornado alley), rare blizzards, and it's unlikely we'll be the target of a terrorist attack.


It's Michigan though
 
2013-11-12 02:09:29 PM
Don't they have flood insurance?
 
2013-11-12 02:14:38 PM

JohnCarter: Sin_City_Superhero: Does anybody know if buildings in the Philippines are built to any sort of building code?

Emelda Marcos shoe code

dittybopper: You know what?  I love the idea that you can do this, but could they make at least some effort to match up the angles?   I'm presuming they are using Google Earth for the before images, and you can adjust the direction, angle, and zoom to match the "after" picture.

Oh, and the whole airport one is a massive fail:  The before image is looking straight down, and the after is at ground level, looking horizontally.

THIS


^That^
 
2013-11-12 02:15:05 PM

durbnpoisn: dittybopper: You know what?  I love the idea that you can do this, but could they make at least some effort to match up the angles?   I'm presuming they are using Google Earth for the before images, and you can adjust the direction, angle, and zoom to match the "after" picture.

Oh, and the whole airport one is a massive fail:  The before image is looking straight down, and the after is at ground level, looking horizontally.

This.  I came here to say it.

Many points for effort.  -1000 points for actual execution.

In any case, it still paints a pretty horrifying vision of what an asshole Mother Nature can be.


The second image down would be *WAY* more impressive if it actually lined up properly, or nearly so, so that you could see that at least 100 yards worth of land is just *GONE*, and all the houses that were one are gone too.
 
2013-11-12 02:17:25 PM

IdBeCrazyIf: ZeroCorpse: That's okay you coastal folks. You keep making fun of "flyover states". Meanwhile, here in Michigan we have no major earthquakes, no hurricanes, no typhoons, no tsunamis, no crazy annual wildfires, rare (almost non-existant) mudslides, extremely rare avalanches (and only in the mountains, which are few and far-between in Michigan), few deadly species of animals (wolves, pumas, rattlesnakes, black widows, brown recluses, and all are rarely seen in civilized areas), rare tornado touchdowns (and they're usually nowhere near as bad as in tornado alley), rare blizzards, and it's unlikely we'll be the target of a terrorist attack.

It's Michigan though


I enjoy Michigan.  I spent most of my life there, until I moved to New Mexico less than a year ago.  There's a lot of beauty in both states.  New Mexico gets some massive fires of course, but on the plus side, we actually get sunshine.
 
2013-11-12 02:23:25 PM

ZeroCorpse: That's okay you coastal folks. You keep making fun of "flyover states". Meanwhile, here in Michigan we have no major earthquakes, no hurricanes, no typhoons, no tsunamis, no crazy annual wildfires, rare (almost non-existant) mudslides, extremely rare avalanches (and only in the mountains, which are few and far-between in Michigan), few deadly species of animals (wolves, pumas, rattlesnakes, black widows, brown recluses, and all are rarely seen in civilized areas), rare tornado touchdowns (and they're usually nowhere near as bad as in tornado alley), rare blizzards, and it's unlikely we'll be the target of a terrorist attack.

I'm happy living in one of the safest states. As long as I avoid Detroit's badlands, Flint, Saginaw City, and don't act like a dipshiat on the Great Lakes, I'm pretty secure here. Nature's kind to us up here. Our biggest threat is each other, and if you're in the right town that's not a problem.

That said, I do feel sorry for the people who suffered the mighty wrath of nature, but maybe that's nature's way of saying "don't live on the shoreline." We'll get more of that in America, too, and everyone will act like it's this big surprised when New York or Miami are destroyed in the big storm that is out there waiting for them, but those of us in "flyover states" know it's coming, and wish you all good luck in the days ahead. Mother Nature's a biatch, and she's been pretty pissed at coastal cities over the past decade or so.


You sound scared.  Maybe you need more guns.
 
2013-11-12 02:26:08 PM
"Excuse me sir, could you bring that body over a little closer? My son here has never seen a body mangled in quite that manner".

/Carlin
 
2013-11-12 02:31:18 PM

Sin_City_Superhero: Does anybody know if buildings in the Philippines are built to any sort of building code?


. . .   - - -   . . .          . . . - - - . . .       . . . - - - . . .
 
2013-11-12 02:33:25 PM
Sin_City_Superhero


Does anybody know if buildings in the Philippines are built to any sort of building code?

Code is pretty similar to that of a 6 year olds box fort in the living room
 
2013-11-12 02:39:04 PM

Sin_City_Superhero: Does anybody know if buildings in the Philippines are built to any sort of building code?


I'd love to see how single family homes built to US code would hold up to something like this.
 
2013-11-12 02:42:34 PM
yay disaster porn
 
2013-11-12 02:43:17 PM

IdBeCrazyIf: ZeroCorpse: That's okay you coastal folks. You keep making fun of "flyover states". Meanwhile, here in Michigan we have no major earthquakes, no hurricanes, no typhoons, no tsunamis, no crazy annual wildfires, rare (almost non-existant) mudslides, extremely rare avalanches (and only in the mountains, which are few and far-between in Michigan), few deadly species of animals (wolves, pumas, rattlesnakes, black widows, brown recluses, and all are rarely seen in civilized areas), rare tornado touchdowns (and they're usually nowhere near as bad as in tornado alley), rare blizzards, and it's unlikely we'll be the target of a terrorist attack.

It's Michigan though


For the midwest, Michigan is pretty good.

Lots of pretty lakes (and not just the Great ones), they actually replanted some of the trees so it's not farking corn from one end to the other like Ohio or Iowa, UP is insanely pretty (though it's faster to drive from Toledo to Atlanta than it is to drive from Toledo to the western side of the UP).

And then because it's Detroit (and no one wants to move to Detroit), white collar salaries in the burbs are ridiculous.  Like 80% of SF on about 1/4th the cost of living.  So you can just take a week off and go screw around in NYC for a week (Or do what my grandparents and go skiing in BC or Utah for a week) (Or do what my mother did and go screw around in various national parks 2x a year).  Or you can be my uncle who managed to own 3 homes and 8 cars on a teacher's salary.
 
2013-11-12 02:53:05 PM

lucksi: Sin_City_Superhero: Does anybody know if buildings in the Philippines are built to any sort of building code?

I'd love to see how single family homes built to US code would hold up to something like this.


Based on what I recall of the tornado threads, not very well.   This is F4/F5 tornado, but it more or less applies.  A bunch of people basically said:

"At 250 MPH, the wind will shred concrete.  And if you manage to build something stronger than concrete, at a certain point, the wind will pick up a car and slam it into the side of your 'stronger than concrete' and then your 'stronger than concrete' will fail.  Your only hope is to go down, at which point you drown in the flooding.  And in the meantime, putting pipes and wiring etc (or even worse, going back in to FIX the pipes and wiring) is an exercise in pain which is why we don't build things out of concrete to begin with."

And that's before you deal with the hours and hours and hours of sustained winds and serious ongoing flooding from the rains and storm surges.
 
2013-11-12 02:56:52 PM

dittybopper: You know what?  I love the idea that you can do this, but could they make at least some effort to match up the angles?   I'm presuming they are using Google Earth for the before images, and you can adjust the direction, angle, and zoom to match the "after" picture.

Oh, and the whole airport one is a massive fail:  The before image is looking straight down, and the after is at ground level, looking horizontally.


They're AP photographs released on the newswires, done by independent photographers. It's not like they can call up and ask for specific angle requests, they're kind of limited to what the AP releases. I doubt CTV has a reporter on the ground there.
 
2013-11-12 02:59:57 PM
Is this the thread where we read about a dirt poor area suffering after a natural disaster, and make sad faces?

:(
 
2013-11-12 03:05:54 PM

Sin_City_Superhero: Does anybody know if buildings in the Philippines are built to any sort of building code?


Even if by some miracle they do have building codes for all structures there, there's not much you can do against flooding on that scale and 200+ MPH winds. Not to mention the overall damage over time to the buildings, considering they get hit by typhoons almost yearly.
 
2013-11-12 03:10:08 PM

YodaBlues: dittybopper: You know what?  I love the idea that you can do this, but could they make at least some effort to match up the angles?   I'm presuming they are using Google Earth for the before images, and you can adjust the direction, angle, and zoom to match the "after" picture.

Oh, and the whole airport one is a massive fail:  The before image is looking straight down, and the after is at ground level, looking horizontally.

They're AP photographs released on the newswires, done by independent photographers. It's not like they can call up and ask for specific angle requests, they're kind of limited to what the AP releases. I doubt CTV has a reporter on the ground there.



The "Before" photos are taken from Google Earth.  They can line them up however they so choose with the press of a button.  It's trivial to match the before photos with the AP pictures of the wreckage.  Nobody is asking the photojournalists to adjust their "After" shots - it's the "Before" shots from GE that could have been fit properly.  CTV was just lazy.

/not that I care
//don't want to sit staring at them
///too depressing for today
 
2013-11-12 03:13:27 PM

kling_klang_bed: Sin_City_Superhero: Does anybody know if buildings in the Philippines are built to any sort of building code?

Even if by some miracle they do have building codes for all structures there, there's not much you can do against flooding on that scale and 200+ MPH winds. Not to mention the overall damage over time to the buildings, considering they get hit by typhoons almost yearly.


Oh, I know that. I was just curious if they have building codes...obviously it wouldn't have helped in this particular instance.
 
2013-11-12 03:16:37 PM

weltallica: 10,000 dead.

[www.creativecriminals.com image 850x586]

Where were you when the world stopped turning?


More like 2500 dead.

And the ad is talking about the 2005 tsunami that killed 250,000 people.
 
2013-11-12 03:23:15 PM

jigger: weltallica: 10,000 dead.

[www.creativecriminals.com image 850x586]

Where were you when the world stopped turning?

More like 2500 dead.

And the ad is talking about the 2005 tsunami that killed 250,000 people.


I'd imagine that by the time they tally up everything, this typhoon will be in the 50,000 person range.
 
2013-11-12 03:25:29 PM

ZeroCorpse: That's okay you coastal folks. You keep making fun of "flyover states". Meanwhile, here in Michigan we have no major earthquakes, no hurricanes, no typhoons, no tsunamis, no crazy annual wildfires, rare (almost non-existant) mudslides, extremely rare avalanches (and only in the mountains, which are few and far-between in Michigan), few deadly species of animals (wolves, pumas, rattlesnakes, black widows, brown recluses, and all are rarely seen in civilized areas), rare tornado touchdowns (and they're usually nowhere near as bad as in tornado alley), rare blizzards, and it's unlikely we'll be the target of a terrorist attack.


Michigan is beautiful in certain areas at certain times of the year. So is New Jersey, for that matter.

The Philippines are, to me anyway, the most beautiful place on earth. It is poetic that all that beauty comes at a price.
 
2013-11-12 03:29:51 PM
hard to tell if some photos i have seen are before or after

looks like most are made of  wood trees
 
2013-11-12 03:31:07 PM
I give it a 7.8 on a 10. Not enough total destruction, and I didn't see that many bodies. Would not buy again.
 
2013-11-12 03:34:20 PM

weltallica: 10,000 dead.

[www.creativecriminals.com image 850x586]

Where were you when the world stopped turning?


False equivalence. The typhoon and the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami weren't preventable. It took a group of fanatical humans to plan 9/11. They should compare natural disaster to natural disaster.
 
2013-11-12 03:44:56 PM

YodaBlues: dittybopper: You know what?  I love the idea that you can do this, but could they make at least some effort to match up the angles?   I'm presuming they are using Google Earth for the before images, and you can adjust the direction, angle, and zoom to match the "after" picture.

Oh, and the whole airport one is a massive fail:  The before image is looking straight down, and the after is at ground level, looking horizontally.

They're AP photographs released on the newswires, done by independent photographers. It's not like they can call up and ask for specific angle requests, they're kind of limited to what the AP releases. I doubt CTV has a reporter on the ground there.


That's true, but the people doing the "Before/After" can use Google Earth to match up the before views to what the AP "after" photographs show.
 
2013-11-12 03:57:22 PM

ZeroCorpse: That's okay you coastal folks. You keep making fun of "flyover states". Meanwhile, here in Michigan we have no major earthquakes, no hurricanes, no typhoons, no tsunamis, no crazy annual wildfires, rare (almost non-existant) mudslides, extremely rare avalanches (and only in the mountains, which are few and far-between in Michigan), few deadly species of animals (wolves, pumas, rattlesnakes, black widows, brown recluses, and all are rarely seen in civilized areas), rare tornado touchdowns (and they're usually nowhere near as bad as in tornado alley), rare blizzards, and it's unlikely we'll be the target of a terrorist attack.

I'm happy living in one of the safest states. As long as I avoid Detroit's badlands, Flint, Saginaw City, and don't act like a dipshiat on the Great Lakes, I'm pretty secure here. Nature's kind to us up here. Our biggest threat is each other, and if you're in the right town that's not a problem.

That said, I do feel sorry for the people who suffered the mighty wrath of nature, but maybe that's nature's way of saying "don't live on the shoreline." We'll get more of that in America, too, and everyone will act like it's this big surprised when New York or Miami are destroyed in the big storm that is out there waiting for them, but those of us in "flyover states" know it's coming, and wish you all good luck in the days ahead. Mother Nature's a biatch, and she's been pretty pissed at coastal cities over the past decade or so.


So glad someone posted this. Seriously, how could we discuss a disaster of this magnitude without someone telling poor people they should pick up their lives and move somewhere else. It's a shame all their boot straps are under water.
 
2013-11-12 03:57:58 PM

This used to be real estate
Now it's only fields and trees
Where, where is the town?
Now, it's nothin' but flowers

 
2013-11-12 03:58:36 PM
Too soon?
 
2013-11-12 04:06:07 PM
I read that Canada is sending in DART teams - those folks, and their foreign counterparts, are heros.

Wishing well all the disaster relief teams!
 
2013-11-12 04:14:27 PM

ZeroCorpse: That's okay you coastal folks. You keep making fun of "flyover states". Meanwhile, here in Michigan we have no major earthquakes, no hurricanes, no typhoons, no tsunamis, no crazy annual wildfires, rare (almost non-existant) mudslides, extremely rare avalanches (and only in the mountains, which are few and far-between in Michigan), few deadly species of animals (wolves, pumas, rattlesnakes, black widows, brown recluses, and all are rarely seen in civilized areas), rare tornado touchdowns (and they're usually nowhere near as bad as in tornado alley), rare blizzards, and it's unlikely we'll be the target of a terrorist attack.

I'm happy living in one of the safest states. As long as I avoid Detroit's badlands, Flint, Saginaw City, and don't act like a dipshiat on the Great Lakes, I'm pretty secure here. Nature's kind to us up here. Our biggest threat is each other, and if you're in the right town that's not a problem.

That said, I do feel sorry for the people who suffered the mighty wrath of nature, but maybe that's nature's way of saying "don't live on the shoreline." We'll get more of that in America, too, and everyone will act like it's this big surprised when New York or Miami are destroyed in the big storm that is out there waiting for them, but those of us in "flyover states" know it's coming, and wish you all good luck in the days ahead. Mother Nature's a biatch, and she's been pretty pissed at coastal cities over the past decade or so.


There's a tribe of giant sasquatch in Michigan with huge erections and one of these days one of them will find you.  And while you're clinging to a tree praying for it to end, you'll tell yourself you wish it was just 235 MPH winds because there's no store-brand cleaner that will ever get all of that sasquatch semen out of your hind quarters.

/And when you get out of the hospital you'll still have to root for the Lions.
 
2013-11-12 04:26:56 PM

SpdrJay: If they gave these storms cuter names they wouldn't seem so depressing and terrible.....

Something like Typhoon Poopsie, or Hurricane Tinklepiddle would really cheer the survivors up!


Locally it was known as Typhoon Yolanda.
 
2013-11-12 04:29:25 PM

Sin_City_Superhero: kling_klang_bed: Sin_City_Superhero: Does anybody know if buildings in the Philippines are built to any sort of building code?

Even if by some miracle they do have building codes for all structures there, there's not much you can do against flooding on that scale and 200+ MPH winds. Not to mention the overall damage over time to the buildings, considering they get hit by typhoons almost yearly.

Oh, I know that. I was just curious if they have building codes...obviously it wouldn't have helped in this particular instance.


We have building codes here, yes.

The question is: How enforced are they? The answer would be: Not really unless its a large structure like a sky scraper or mall or warehouse or condo/house.
 
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