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(Billings Gazette)   "It's win-win," claims busybody mother after firmly losing bid to force school district to remove Sherman Alexie novel from reading list   (billingsgazette.com) divider line 49
    More: Fail, Sherman Alexie, School District 2, school districts  
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7518 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Nov 2013 at 7:29 AM (42 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



49 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-11-12 07:32:51 AM
Sherman Alexie thanks you for the free press, crazy lady.
 
2013-11-12 07:35:46 AM
Not happy

mqcdnzone.moviequoter.netdna-cdn.com

/Hot
//GIS was "nazi cow field of dreams"
 
2013-11-12 07:36:02 AM
I think this deserves the "spiffy" tag rather than "FAIL". Sure, the idiot parent failed, but the students, teachers, other parents, and school board all used common sense and kept the book on the reading list. You don't see too many stories about the school system NOT changing the rules for one upset parent.
 
2013-11-12 07:42:07 AM
"I'm sorry sir but that is not a 'hair' question."

img.fark.net
 
2013-11-12 07:46:00 AM
Stupid article doesn't quote her saying that she never read the book, nor would she ever read such filth. I'm assuming that she said this at one point.
 
2013-11-12 07:47:06 AM
I never heard of Sherman Alexie.  From his Wiki entry:

Alexie's poetry, short stories and novels all assert the same themes: despair, poverty, violence and alcoholism among the lives of Native American people.  According to Sarah A. Quirk from the Dictionary of Library Biography, Alexie asks three questions across all of his works: "What does it mean to live as an Indian in this time? What does it mean to be an Indian man? Finally, what does it mean to live on an Indian reservation?"  The protagonists in most of his literary works exhibit a constant struggle with themselves and their own sense of powerlessness among white American society.

Which one of Alexie's themes undermines western society?
 
2013-11-12 07:48:40 AM
Wow, he found time to write a book *and* be George Jefferson?
 
2013-11-12 07:49:41 AM
The Absolutely True Diary of Someone Who Didn't Answer a survey question to continue reading this content.
 
2013-11-12 07:50:27 AM
Thank you Billings Gazette I will not take your survey. If this is because of the same blasphemous fapping phrase in the book that is too rough for the youngin's, then talk to teacher. Let the teacher know you are not comfortable letting your kid read it at their age. Don't go full-on ban.
 
2013-11-12 07:52:54 AM
Hannelore Carter was a little girl in 1940s Germany and she spoke to the committee about the importance of a free society.
Talk of removing the book from SD2's required reading list "brought me back to the grim reminder of growing up in Nazi Germany," she said.


They were dark days, when the Nazi's amended required reading lists.

She understands they could still read the book, right?
 
2013-11-12 07:53:42 AM
Farking idiot.

endmile: I think this deserves the "spiffy" tag rather than "FAIL". Sure, the idiot parent failed, but the students, teachers, other parents, and school board all used common sense and kept the book on the reading list. You don't see too many stories about the school system NOT changing the rules for one upset parent.


Except that the school board enacted yet another ridiculous "opt out policy" for novels, a growing movement across this country that gives halfwits like this the ability to decide that any given work assigned to their spawn is actually too "offensive" and, as a result demand another novel just for their sheltered little idiot in training that's "equivalent" to the first selection and actually ends up demanding that the teacher run parallel units for almost any given reading assignment. It's bubble education where uneducated morons governed by persecution complexes and prudish paranoia create their own little bubble that ends up affecting everyone around them and, as a result, making everyone a little more stupid. People like this should be put on islands.
 
2013-11-12 07:55:23 AM

Muta: "I'm sorry sir but that is not a 'hair' question."


i.imgur.com
 
2013-11-12 07:57:08 AM

Muta: I never heard of Sherman Alexie.  From his Wiki entry:

Alexie's poetry, short stories and novels all assert the same themes: despair, poverty, violence and alcoholism among the lives of Native American people.  According to Sarah A. Quirk from the Dictionary of Library Biography, Alexie asks three questions across all of his works: "What does it mean to live as an Indian in this time? What does it mean to be an Indian man? Finally, what does it mean to live on an Indian reservation?"  The protagonists in most of his literary works exhibit a constant struggle with themselves and their own sense of powerlessness among white American society.

Which one of Alexie's themes undermines western society?


I don't know.  It sounds an awful lot like letting everyone know that white people won.
 
2013-11-12 07:58:24 AM

Muta: I never heard of Sherman Alexie.  From his Wiki entry:

Alexie's poetry, short stories and novels all assert the same themes: despair, poverty, violence and alcoholism among the lives of Native American people.  According to Sarah A. Quirk from the Dictionary of Library Biography, Alexie asks three questions across all of his works: "What does it mean to live as an Indian in this time? What does it mean to be an Indian man? Finally, what does it mean to live on an Indian reservation?"  The protagonists in most of his literary works exhibit a constant struggle with themselves and their own sense of powerlessness among white American society.

Which one of Alexie's themes undermines western society?


A 'don't have to answer a question' Link.
It seems she would prefer an account which isn't so graphic in it's description of real life on a reservation for her little Siddhartha. She also mentions racial slurs so hopefully she's going after Mark Twain as well(not really).
 
2013-11-12 07:58:33 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: The Absolutely True Diary of Someone Who Didn't Answer a survey question to continue reading this content.


Just have fun with them...  I got the question about designing an app. I told them I wanted it to find me cheap hookers.

On topic comment...  I am currently dealing with a parent who wants Arthur's Halloween taken out of the library because the reference to witches is offensive. (Yes, the kid's book Arthur.)
 
2013-11-12 07:58:42 AM
Don't want your children reading upsetting books? Just put their eyes out with hot coals, that way they'll never leave you. It's win-win.
 
2013-11-12 07:59:33 AM
Is anyone else getting a "You must answer this survey question to continue or like us on Facebook" script blocking the article?
 
2013-11-12 08:01:14 AM
FTFA: "The hearing was in response to a request from parent Gail Supola, who had asked the district last spring to remove the book from the district's required reading list. She was concerned with the book's coarse language and its portrayal of American Indian life."

Precisely how disconnected from reality is this woman?  Course language?  Has she ever listened to how teenagers speak?

Add to that, the portrayal of American Indian life...assuming this book is set in modern day society I imagine the portrayal is pretty bleak.  Alcoholism runs rampant in a lot of tribes, most tribe members live at or below the poverty level, hard drugs are starting to make their way into the tribe, compound that with trying to adhere to tribal culture and tradition and balancing that with living in a modern society...

Sorry to break it to you lady, but that's life.  Life is a lot more harsh than debating the types of flowers that should be plated in the common areas of your neighborhood at next weeks HOA meeting.  Trying to protect your teenager from knowing what the sometimes harsh realities of modern day living are will only result in their detriment.
 
2013-11-12 08:03:43 AM

Muta: I never heard of Sherman Alexie.  From his Wiki entry:

Alexie's poetry, short stories and novels all assert the same themes: despair, poverty, violence and alcoholism among the lives of Native American people.  According to Sarah A. Quirk from the Dictionary of Library Biography, Alexie asks three questions across all of his works: "What does it mean to live as an Indian in this time? What does it mean to be an Indian man? Finally, what does it mean to live on an Indian reservation?"  The protagonists in most of his literary works exhibit a constant struggle with themselves and their own sense of powerlessness among white American society.

Which one of Alexie's themes undermines western society?


I'd imagine it's the fact that his stories likely portray the systematic removal of indigenous peoples from their ancestral homeland and the formation of the reservation system as a possible contributor to the disproportionally large rates of social dysfunction (in forms such as substance abuse, depression, and suicide rates) among these people. Acting like Manifest Destiny may have had harmful consequences leads people to question the virtue of our founding mythology, and as such erodes confidence in our own American exceptionalism. Can't the kids just read Horatio Alger books so they know everything is perfect, they live in a pure meritocracy, and that any harm that comes to people is the result of their own vices?

/never seen it, but I have heard great things about his movie Smoke Signals
 
2013-11-12 08:08:13 AM

Pocket Ninja: Except that the school board enacted yet another ridiculous "opt out policy" for novels


The 'opt out' isn't all bad.  I remember being in 7th grade and stumbling across Slaughterhouse Five.  What attracted me to the novel was that it had naughty parts.  I read it and over a half dozen other Vonnegut novels and collections.  It was my introduction do serious fiction.  Just like girls with chastity rings indirectly announce to the boys which chicks put out, the opt out lists tell the kids which books have naughty parts which should attract some readers.
 
2013-11-12 08:09:19 AM

Pocket Ninja: Farking idiot.

endmile: I think this deserves the "spiffy" tag rather than "FAIL". Sure, the idiot parent failed, but the students, teachers, other parents, and school board all used common sense and kept the book on the reading list. You don't see too many stories about the school system NOT changing the rules for one upset parent.

Except that the school board enacted yet another ridiculous "opt out policy" for novels, a growing movement across this country that gives halfwits like this the ability to decide that any given work assigned to their spawn is actually too "offensive" and, as a result demand another novel just for their sheltered little idiot in training that's "equivalent" to the first selection and actually ends up demanding that the teacher run parallel units for almost any given reading assignment. It's bubble education where uneducated morons governed by persecution complexes and prudish paranoia create their own little bubble that ends up affecting everyone around them and, as a result, making everyone a little more stupid. People like this should be put on islands.


Was with ya up till the "put on islands". I kinda like islands, you know...

"Opt out" policy seems pretty much counterproductive to the reason such a curriculum was put together. There are things we need to know and understand, if only for the sake of not redoing the mistakes of our ancestors. We need to be able to walk open-eyed into the world and see what's going on. We need to... get that lady a personal stylist cause DAMN that shirt's giving me a melanoma!

Where was I?

So anyway, nuclear subs for everyone and I'll have the orange sundae!
 
2013-11-12 08:09:19 AM

Abstruse: Is anyone else getting a "You must answer this survey question to continue or like us on Facebook" script blocking the article?


No Script + Ad Block = I have no idea what you and others in this thread are talking about.
 
2013-11-12 08:16:36 AM
Grungehamster:
/never seen it, but I have heard great things about his movie Smoke Signals

Smoke Signals freaking rocks.  It strikes a great tone between comedy, drama, and real life accuracy.  It's a little cleaned up, but not in an unbelievable way.  It's more that those people simply aren't exposed to the harsher side of life in the course of the film.  At the same time the characters develop beutifully and the 2 male protagonists make an excellent allegory for the public perception of the native americans trying to reach a realisic center between them.
 
2013-11-12 08:19:01 AM
it's 2013, lady
your opinion on literature is farking worthless
you don't know what is best for the rest of us evolving types
stop being so goddamn vain
 
2013-11-12 08:22:17 AM

natas6.0: it's 2013, lady
your opinion on literature is farking worthless
you don't know what is best for the rest of us evolving types
stop being so goddamn vain



Well, to be fair, judging her simply by her hair and choice in clothes, it appears she never left the 80's:

img.fark.net
 
2013-11-12 08:31:28 AM
If the values you instill in your child can be threatened or destroyed by a 10th grade book report one has to wonder how vital those values were in the first place. I especially love that the novel was written by an Indian and yet this woman is concerned about how their lifestyle and reality is portrayed. If you are offended enough about the written description maybe you should get up and try to help them out instead of trying to ban a book.
 
2013-11-12 08:35:50 AM

Abstruse: Is anyone else getting a "You must answer this survey question to continue or like us on Facebook" script blocking the article?


Just troll the shiat out of those surveys and be done with it. That's what I do.

Now, as far as the lady in this article, she's a nitwit who wants to tell your children what they can and can't read. It's bad enough that her spawn will be ignorant souls but she wants to push that on other people's kids as well. Glad she was denied her request.
 
2013-11-12 08:38:03 AM
I loathe censorship.
 
2013-11-12 08:40:46 AM

Pocket Ninja: Farking idiot.

endmile: I think this deserves the "spiffy" tag rather than "FAIL". Sure, the idiot parent failed, but the students, teachers, other parents, and school board all used common sense and kept the book on the reading list. You don't see too many stories about the school system NOT changing the rules for one upset parent.

Except that the school board enacted yet another ridiculous "opt out policy" for novels, a growing movement across this country that gives halfwits like this the ability to decide that any given work assigned to their spawn is actually too "offensive" and, as a result demand another novel just for their sheltered little idiot in training that's "equivalent" to the first selection and actually ends up demanding that the teacher run parallel units for almost any given reading assignment. It's bubble education where uneducated morons governed by persecution complexes and prudish paranoia create their own little bubble that ends up affecting everyone around them and, as a result, making everyone a little more stupid. People like this should be put on islands.


This. Stupidity like this is contagious.
 
2013-11-12 08:44:37 AM

RTOGUY: If the values you instill in your child can be threatened or destroyed by a 10th grade book report one has to wonder how vital those values were in the first place. I especially love that the novel was written by an Indian and yet this woman is concerned about how their lifestyle and reality is portrayed. If you are offended enough about the written description maybe you should get up and try to help them out instead of trying to ban a book.


Also this.

It seems like it doesn't stand up to a whole lot of scrutiny.
 
2013-11-12 08:47:06 AM
I'm just gonna say this, because I'm guessing a lot of people here are too old to have read it:  The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian is fantastic.  It's among a handful of YA books that I'd recommend to adults without hesitation, but it's also exactly the kind of book that should be taught in every high school.  It's been challenged in schools and libraries a bunch of times, but it's one of those books that kids will still be reading 50 years from now.

Sherman Alexie is great in general; I'd recommend his work all-around.  But even for an adult, this one is a good place to start.
 
2013-11-12 08:58:03 AM
What possible need is there to learn about a tiny, almost dead culture with no relevance to  Americans' lives?
 
2013-11-12 08:59:43 AM
Sherman Alexie's work is amazing. This woman is an idiot, but not the first to protest this particular book. I'm sure Mr. Alexie is amused by it, as he seems to have been by the ones in the past; and the increased sales that typically follow something like this.

Smoke Signals (based on one of his short stories) was still on Netflix last time I looked. It's a great movie, with a bunch of great Native American actors in it. The other movie based on Alexie's work, The Business of Fancydancing, is a little harder to track down. I actually prefer his other YA novel, Flight, to the one discussed in this article, but they are both really good books. Not to mention that The Absolutely True Diary is semi-autobiographical, based on the author's own experience in leaving his reservation to pursue education at a predominantly white school. His writing is harsh sometimes, but it's equal opportunity harsh, as I like to say. No one, including the author himself, escapes criticism. His writing is also poignant, hilarious, and sometimes kind of trippy. I picked up the first of his books that I read based on the description, knowing nothing about the author himself. But come on, who wouldn't want to know how Robert Johnson and his cursed guitar wound up on a Spokane Indian reservation in the present (or what was the present when the book was written)? You just don't run across stuff like that every day.

His latest collection of short stories, Blasphemy, came out in paperback recently, and it's not a bad starting point for anyone who is interested in his work. It's a collection of new and selected stories, which includes some of my personal favorites (What You Pawn, I Will Redeem is my all time favorite and it's in this book), as well as some great new stuff.

/Sorry, once you get me going about Sherman Alexie it's hard to get me to shut the hell up.
 
2013-11-12 09:22:23 AM

Endive Wombat: Abstruse: Is anyone else getting a "You must answer this survey question to continue or like us on Facebook" script blocking the article?

No Script + Ad Block = I have no idea what you and others in this thread are talking about.



This.
--Repeated and bolded for the benefit of those who missed it the first time--
 
2013-11-12 09:59:30 AM
Actual quote from the last "apprentice" I tried to teach machining:

"Books are stupid, they don't DO anything."
 
2013-11-12 10:13:02 AM
I read a couple of his books in college. Good stuff. Seems like it'd be good reading for teenagers.

Especially in a state like Montana, where 6.5% of the population is native. (As opposed to 1.2% nationally.)
 
2013-11-12 10:13:39 AM

Deathfrogg: Actual quote from the last "apprentice" I tried to teach machining:

"Books are stupid, they don't DO anything."


...please be kidding. Pretty please.
 
2013-11-12 10:23:11 AM

Deathfrogg: Actual quote from the last "apprentice" I tried to teach machining:

"Books are stupid, they don't DO anything."


As a technical writer, that has to be one of the saddest quotes I've read this week.
 
2013-11-12 10:41:41 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: The Absolutely True Diary of Someone Who Didn't Answer a survey question to continue reading this content.


My survey question was "Do I have an iPhone and do I buy guitar strings online?"

Seems like an oddly specific "survey" question.  Also, I don't have an iPhone.  And I buy my strings at a music store.
 
2013-11-12 11:12:43 AM

Sharksfan: Quantum Apostrophe: The Absolutely True Diary of Someone Who Didn't Answer a survey question to continue reading this content.

My survey question was "Do I have an iPhone and do I buy guitar strings online?"

Seems like an oddly specific "survey" question.  Also, I don't have an iPhone.  And I buy my strings at a music store.


I own an air guitar you insensitive clod!
 
2013-11-12 11:16:37 AM

Pocket Ninja: Farking idiot.

endmile: I think this deserves the "spiffy" tag rather than "FAIL". Sure, the idiot parent failed, but the students, teachers, other parents, and school board all used common sense and kept the book on the reading list. You don't see too many stories about the school system NOT changing the rules for one upset parent.

Except that the school board enacted yet another ridiculous "opt out policy" for novels, a growing movement across this country that gives halfwits like this the ability to decide that any given work assigned to their spawn is actually too "offensive" and, as a result demand another novel just for their sheltered little idiot in training that's "equivalent" to the first selection and actually ends up demanding that the teacher run parallel units for almost any given reading assignment. It's bubble education where uneducated morons governed by persecution complexes and prudish paranoia create their own little bubble that ends up affecting everyone around them and, as a result, making everyone a little more stupid. People like this should be put on islands.


I can't decide if I like you more in character, or those rare instances when you break character. It's a tough call.
 
2013-11-12 12:22:15 PM
Hey, Victor, I remember one time when me and your dad tried to get a book banned and failed.
 
2013-11-12 12:41:18 PM
I can't see how you can teach an opt-out kid.  They can't participate in class discussions of the work they are excused from, and what do you do with them during that time?  Part of the process of really learning about a book is interacting with others who have different viewpoints and different takes on a book, I guess these kids will just have to read a lot of articles about the special book they are reading instead.  This is going to be a royal pain for the teachers as they will have to find books that appease these parents and then grade totally different work and have to compare it to what the rest of the class is doing, and you better not give that kid a lower grade or I am sure Mommy and Daddy will be all over you for discriminating against their spawn.  The real nightmare would be having the substitute book be found "objectionable", I am sure that will be a suing.

This school district and ones like them just threw their teachers under the bus (again!), and opened themselves up to more complaints and possibly lawsuits.  Great job guys!
 
2013-11-12 12:47:16 PM

dv-ous: Deathfrogg: Actual quote from the last "apprentice" I tried to teach machining:

"Books are stupid, they don't DO anything."

...please be kidding. Pretty please.


This was the middle of the second week after the kid was hired. He was hired because he was the son of boss' best RC Airplane pal at the club they were in together, and had supposedly just graduated from a CNC training course at the local Community College.

The actual conversation went something like this:

"There are two axis' on this lathe. All you need to do is bring the turret forward, then bring it back with these arrow keys (Fanuc 20L control for you CNC dorks) at 50% rapid to zero the machine before you start the spindle."
Him: "Why do you need to zero it out every morning?"
Me: "Because the machine doesn't know where the turret is until it has a set starting point to count from."
Him: "But its just a computer, why can't it just run like it did yesterday?"
Me: "Because thats just how the control works."
Him: "That doesn't make any sense."
Me, sigh. "Thats just how it works." I didn't want to take the time to explain to him something he should have already known, given the alleged classwork he'd done in the CNC training course he spent a year and about $8000 of the taxpayers money on.
So, to continue:
Me: "Look, the tool turret isn't set at zero when you come in in the morning, it is sitting at the position where it can rotate to change the tool. It doesn't know where the zero point is until it has been brought back to the little sensor that establishes that exact spot where the machine starts its count for the distance."
Him: "What distance?"
Me: "The distance from the zero point to the end of the material. Look, you gotta learn this control. It's simple and everything is already set up for you, just run the machine." (I was already seriously frustrated at this point, having been though this several times already.)

So I got out the operators manual that came with the Lathe. Showed him the pretty pictures, explained to him how the startup procedure works and the offset arm functions, etc. It was quite easy to understand. It illustrated a very elementary, step-by-step process for all the various functions of the control and the lathe it was mounted on. I showed him how to follow each step as it was spelled out in the manual. I could teach a chimpanzee with down's syndrome to run this machine. This was a 21 year old. As time progressed I realized that to get him to understand anything, I would have to explain things to him as I would a 5 year old.

So, after showing him, every single day how to set the tool offsets, and start the machine up every morning, I made the mistake of attempting to use the actual manual that came with the machine. He had been shown this, several times over the previous week or so.

So, later that day we had to do a job change, so I was going through how to set the tool offsets and the bar feeder length and set the machine up. All he had to do, was to GENTLY touch the tool tips to the sensors on the little offset presetter, which for you rubes is a little mechanical arm that rotates down next to the spindle and has four little buttons on it that you touch the cutter tips to, to establish that distance from the tips of the tools to the workpiece. This is a procedure one must do every time one changes out a cutter because the carbide insert doesn't always go into the same exact spot in the toolholder when you flip it around to a fresh corner. The tool presetter is VERY sensitive, and accurate to .00002 of an inch. This kid had been shown how to do this, repeatedly. So I stood back, and made him go through the procedure, step by step, as I had shown him, and as the manual spelled out. There is a little handwheel on the control that you use to bring the turret forward and steer the tool into the workpiece or the presetter, and touch the sensors or make a quick cut on the material being machined. There is also a "rapid" setting, which uses arrow keys on the control to run at speed along the axis' of travel. One does NOT use the "rapid/feed" keys to set the offsets on the tool.

First tool he sets by himself: WHAM. $12,000 damage to the presetter arm. I heard this from the office, where I was talking with the boss about a job that was coming in. So I run back out there, leaving the Boss to facepalm himself into a subdural hematoma. I was farking PISSED.
"How did you crash this machine?'
"I don't know, it just crashed."
"If you weren't sure about how to do this, why didn't you read the manual?"
"Meh, that book makes no sense."
"How did you crash the machine?"
"Well, I tried to use the arrow keys to bring the turret up to the arm cause it's faster."
"I showed you in the book where it says specifically not to do that. I told you to never do that."
"Pffft, I never read those things."
Me, very sarcastic: "Oh, you don't read books?"
"Books are stupid, they don't do anything."

The boss would not let me fire this imbecile. I had to set up every job for this kid for the next year, including all the basic stuff like setting the offsets and doing shiat like squaring the vises up on the mills. I lasted almost a year after this kid was hired. I walked out six months after having my hours reduced to 32 a week which put me below the minimum I needed to make my farking rent and I lost my apartment. All that, while the boss was doing side deals with some of our regular repair-part customers to do the work at his personal shop at his house for cash.

Thats right, Republicans. Keep farking your workers over. See how long they last once they realize you're farking them.
 
2013-11-12 02:39:07 PM

Abstruse: Is anyone else getting a "You must answer this survey question to continue or like us on Facebook" script blocking the article?



All you have to do is keep clicking the 'give me another question' and it takes you to the full article after three tries.
 
2013-11-12 03:01:50 PM

Sharksfan: Quantum Apostrophe: The Absolutely True Diary of Someone Who Didn't Answer a survey question to continue reading this content.

My survey question was "Do I have an iPhone and do I buy guitar strings online?"

Seems like an oddly specific "survey" question.  Also, I don't have an iPhone.  And I buy my strings at a music store.


It asked me a farking grade school math question... Seriously! Some shiat like "Bob spent $100 on his phone and $10 on a pen. How many pens could he buy for the cost of his phone?"... WTF?! Just what are they going for with these "survey" questions, anyway??

/Bob buys overpriced pens...
 
2013-11-12 04:58:58 PM

Muta: I never heard of Sherman Alexie.  From his Wiki entry:

Alexie's poetry, short stories and novels all assert the same themes: despair, poverty, violence and alcoholism among the lives of Native American people.  According to Sarah A. Quirk from the Dictionary of Library Biography, Alexie asks three questions across all of his works: "What does it mean to live as an Indian in this time? What does it mean to be an Indian man? Finally, what does it mean to live on an Indian reservation?"  The protagonists in most of his literary works exhibit a constant struggle with themselves and their own sense of powerlessness among white American society.

Which one of Alexie's themes undermines western society?


Maybe if white people had treated the Indians a little better Alexie wouldn't have had to write all those books ya dumb coont
 
2013-11-12 08:51:13 PM
However, they will also recommend that the board review, supplement or correct policies dealing with how parents receive reading lists and how their students can opt out of required texts.

Great! Now, when a student or their farked-up parents choose to opt out becuz widdle special snowflake, they get to read TWO books. I'm sure the kids will catch on quickly, either that they should STFU and read the damn assigned book, or that their parents farked-up beliefs cause them extra suffering.
 
2013-11-13 02:32:39 AM
Hey lady, how about you read the WHOLE book, and then sit down with your snowflake to discuss it with them, ask them if they have any questions. At that point, then you can tell your little crotchfruit how bad it is. If they agree, congratulations, you succeeded in brainwashing them. If not, congratulations, you just taught someone independent thought.

Also...


bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com

farm6.staticflickr.com
 
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