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(Washington Post)   Military bases are exclusive gated communities run by an utterly insane HOA   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 108
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12896 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Nov 2013 at 3:13 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-12 02:04:44 AM  
Bliss is actually open to the public. You have to provide ID at the gate, but El Paso civilians are invited to come over. A s far as the exchange/commissary, they are integrated into the military's only open-aired life-style center. Shopping, restaurants, bars and theater. Google "freedom crossing at fort bliss"... I would but I'm on my phone.
 
2013-11-12 04:18:58 AM  
I can only speak from what I know of Navy bases, but many of them are there because they blanket wealthy neighborhoods. The Base Realignment and Closure Commission of 1993 shut down the Navy boot camps in Orlando and San Diego. The remaining facility of Great Lakes is sandwiched between the prestigious neighborhood of Gurny and the relative slums of North Chicago. Hence, acting as a buffer. The sub base at King's Bay borders on the wealthy neighborhood on Saint Simon's island. These facilities made it through tough times for the military due to the buffer they provided the wealthy folk. The poor can't be trusted that close to the rich. Hence these bases are vital to the community.
 
2013-11-12 07:30:58 AM  

Sgt Otter: Last time I checked, putting yourself on the list for post housing is voluntary (there's usually a massive waiting list), and I know a lot of people who prefer to life off-post in civilian rental properties for exactly the reasons listed.

Most of my friends who lived on post, hated it.  Besides the HOA from Hell rules, there's always the:

"The kids are doing stupid shiat in the barracks.  Call in one of the NCOs."
"Which one?"
"Well, they're SGT Jackson's troops, but he lives way out in BFE.  Oh, call SSG Smith, he lives on base."


I caught a lot of that, too. "HM1 Smith loves out in BFE. Call HM2 FarkLord because he lives in the barracks."
 
2013-11-12 08:23:09 AM  
The military tells them where to live, whom to work for and what to do.


God, it's like they think we're in the Army or something.

And I have to cut the grass on the house they loan me for free? I can't let it get knee-high so I don't have to look at the old washing machine I left on the front lawn? I thought this was America, not Germany.

/19 years (so far) in the Corps
/Signal Corps
 
2013-11-12 08:29:05 AM  
I grew up an Air Force brat, and then joined the Navy, and now I'm working a pretty sweet civillian gig, so I'm getting a kick etc etc..

Anyway, I didn't really notice it as a kid. We lived overseas except for two years when I was about 3-4 years old and my first two years of high school. When your parents have to drive you around everywhere, it doesn't really matter. But then again, we lived off base mostly. I made friends with the local kids. But when we did live on base that year in high school it did feel separated.

When I really started to see it was when I joined, myself. I was forced to live in the barracks until I made E-5, and I hated every minute of it. I lived with the people I worked with. We went on months-long deployments where they were the only people I came in contact with, then when we got home, they wanted to hang out and party. No thanks.

The worst isolationists I noticed were officer's wives. Enlisted wives, too, somewhat. Most of the servicemembers I knew and know are interested in the new place they've been stationed and want to get out and do things in the local economy.
 
2013-11-12 08:57:25 AM  
And, yes, the transition to civilian life from decades of growing up in the military can be difficult. If you're smart about it, it doesn't have to be. You're forced to go to a "transition class" but most people don't really pay attention and there's a good deal of fluff included to make the course much longer than it needs to be. You can take other resume-specific and interview-skill-specific workshops. That's what I did, and it really helped. Translating your skills from military jargon is the hardest part.

Wait, no. Learning how to dress like a civilian business professional was the hardest for me. My whole life up to the day i got out I wore jeans/t-shirt or a uniform. Sure, I owned a suit and I could tie a tie, but I am still sometimes the only one in the room "dressed up" or worse, "down" from what everyone else is wearing. It definitely helps to have a wife who helps me match things together though.
 
J3
2013-11-12 11:13:20 AM  

deconstructed: I spent 18 years living on base in the Marine Corpse childrens auxiliary (brat), then went in the Chair Farce for 11 years.   When I got out they stole my childhood.

No ID card = no visiting the hospital I was born in, school I went to, place of first kiss/fornication, houses I grew up in, neighborhoods I played in.

I have not past

/Sad Story



One of the first things I looked up when Google maps added satellite imagery was all my old houses and schools on military bases that I hadn't seen since I was a kid.
 
2013-11-12 08:12:36 PM  

J3: deconstructed: I spent 18 years living on base in the Marine Corpse childrens auxiliary (brat), then went in the Chair Farce for 11 years.   When I got out they stole my childhood.

No ID card = no visiting the hospital I was born in, school I went to, place of first kiss/fornication, houses I grew up in, neighborhoods I played in.

I have not past

/Sad Story


One of the first things I looked up when Google maps added satellite imagery was all my old houses and schools on military bases that I hadn't seen since I was a kid.


I did the same thing

 
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