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(Washington Post)   Which of the 11 American Nations do you inhabit?   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 36
    More: Interesting, Americans, dominant culture, Portland Press Herald, cultural artifact, left coast, red states and blue states, social engineers  
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23528 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Nov 2013 at 12:40 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2013-11-09 10:08:21 AM  
8 votes:
What a stupid farking article.  I've lived in 3 of those "nations" and you know what?  They're all pretty much the same.   You might spot a few differences here and there, but its all the same goddamned country basically especially when you consider how freely many of us move about it.  I've lived in 4 different states - 6 different metropolitan areas.  I won't even break down how many actual cities.

I've also been to all 11 of those "nations".  Some of them have unique qualities.  The weather varies more than the people, but we're all the same country.  I love how people make fun of Texas, Arizona and Florida, but do you realize that a whole lot of residents of those states weren't even born there?  When I lived in AZ, I never actually met a native.  I met people from California, Mexico, Idaho, Wyoming, but nobody who was actually born there.

People say the South is racist, but I never saw racism until I lived in a Northern state and then it was both black on white and white on black racism.

And yet for the most part, most people were decent.  There are some really shiatty places in the US, but there are a lot of good people living in those shiatty places.  I don't really know why, but it's probably because they were born there and just couldn't figure out that they could move or maybe they didn't have the money to move.
2013-11-09 01:40:04 PM  
4 votes:
A Manhattanite's view of the USA

strangemaps.files.wordpress.com
2013-11-09 01:36:07 PM  
3 votes:
i.imgur.com

Fark, I am disappoint.
2013-11-09 01:06:59 PM  
3 votes:
Thank you for recognizing that South Louisiana is very different from the rest of the Deep South.
2013-11-09 02:28:16 PM  
2 votes:

Slam1263: This one seems more accurate:

[www-personal.umich.edu image 850x573]


Maybe you should use the cartogram that sizes the counties by population, since people vote, not square miles.

www-personal.umich.edu

There's also a map that blends the red and blue by voting percentage
www-personal.umich.edu
2013-11-09 01:13:52 PM  
2 votes:

Voiceofreason01: or the short version of the article: a map of how the author imagines the world to be


The author of TFA isn't the one who made the map. If you read the linked to article from Tufts you'll see there's more to it than some people think there is.
2013-11-09 01:08:21 PM  
2 votes:
Far West. All these designations are stupid; people of all types live everywhere. Everyone thinks that Montana is some kind of wild hillbillywood where everybody is poor and stupid and has a gun, but there's just as many people who moved here because they're tree-hugging liberals who love the outdoors and can afford to live here.
2013-11-09 12:03:10 PM  
2 votes:
I live in the great Chickasaw Nation........
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-11-09 11:36:56 AM  
2 votes:

Lor M. Ipsum: I agree with everything else you say but this.  I saw plenty of racism when I lived in northwest Florida, both white-on-black and black-on-white.  One did not have to look far.

However, I've also lived in rural Michigan and have not seen a lick of racism, but I might attribute that to the lack of racial diversity in those areas.  I would imagine it to be different in the more urban areas.


It's pretty common for people from the south to deny that they ever saw any racism there, but it's just pride.  I grew up in the South and there's no way you could live there and not hear racist things, pretty much daily.

Not that there isn't any any where else, but it's a part of the culture in the South.
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-11-09 11:21:58 AM  
2 votes:
It didn't take long for the redneck butthurt to show up did it?
2013-11-09 10:47:46 AM  
2 votes:
This is a thinly disguised anti-gun screed.  What a maroon!

Chicago is in the low violent death area because of its good gun control.
Fort Worth is in the high violent death area because of lax gun laws and stand your ground.
Of course, no evidence to back any of this horseshiat up.
I guess Fort Worth should start doing like the low violence areas of Detroit, New York City, Philly, LA, Compton, Oakland, DC, etc.

/*snicker*
2013-11-09 07:25:02 PM  
1 votes:
Well, I'll have to disagree with those people claiming there's no difference between the "nations".

I've lived in Greater Appalachia (WV), Tidewater (NC and VA), Deep South (NC, SC, and GA, The Midlands (MD and OH), and now I'm back in Greater Appalachia (NC). Also, I almost moved to New France (LA). I backed out of that job just before Katrina hit, though.

Just by itself, North Carolina is a good example of three of those regions. There's a lot of "bleed-over" around the borders, but the Tidewater is very different from Greater Appalachia, and the Deep South section of NC is very different from both. Western NC and western VA have more in common with each other than they do with the eastern halves of their own states, and southeastern NC has more in common with SC and GA than it does with the rest of NC.

I think those who don't see the difference are just seeing the cities. All of the major cities could almost be considered their own nation, as their attitudes are often closer to those of other cities than they are to the country just a few miles away, Asheville, NC (though a smaller city than most) has little in common with towns just one county over, and Atlanta, GA has much the same issue with its own surrounding counties. The difference is less pronounced in the Tidewater and Midlands, as there is more "city" than there is "country". It's MORE pronounced in the Deep South, as the "city" and the "country" often have extreme differences in their ideologies.
2013-11-09 03:58:17 PM  
1 votes:
images3.wikia.nocookie.net
2013-11-09 02:56:54 PM  
1 votes:
The cultural gulf between Appalachia and Yankeedom, Deep South and New Netherland is simply too large. But it's conceivable that some new alliance could form to tip the balance.

Alliances between radically-different groups are typically formed in response to a shared threat.

25.media.tumblr.com
"Say, that gives me an idea."
2013-11-09 02:40:43 PM  
1 votes:
More map fun. Cartogram of the world's population
www.esri.com

This is also a "fun fact", although it suffers severe distortion because of the projection they chose to use (Mollweide projection, if you're curious)
2.bp.blogspot.com
All methods of projections of a sphere (Earth) onto a 2D surface will suffer some sort of distortion, you just need to pick the map that has the least distortion for the purpose you're using it for.


And the relevant clip from the West Wing ("you're freaking me out")
2013-11-09 01:49:47 PM  
1 votes:
How the average European views America.

cynicalqueer.files.wordpress.com
2013-11-09 01:49:25 PM  
1 votes:
img.fark.net

This guy sees the same inevitability that Randall sees.
2013-11-09 01:45:25 PM  
1 votes:

vpb: Lor M. Ipsum: I agree with everything else you say but this.  I saw plenty of racism when I lived in northwest Florida, both white-on-black and black-on-white.  One did not have to look far.

However, I've also lived in rural Michigan and have not seen a lick of racism, but I might attribute that to the lack of racial diversity in those areas.  I would imagine it to be different in the more urban areas.

It's pretty common for people from the south to deny that they ever saw any racism there, but it's just pride.  I grew up in the South and there's no way you could live there and not hear racist things, pretty much daily.

Not that there isn't any any where else, but it's a part of the culture in the South.


There is an old saying, "In the South, people don't mind negroes in their homes as long as they ain't uppity.  In the North, people don't mind negroes being uppity, as long as they stay out of their house."

I'm not sure if actual data will bear it out, but it does seem to reflect the respective cultures.  White people in the South dealt with blacks on a daily basis.  First as slaves, then as servants, but always in close proximity.  In the North, black people were largely an abstraction until after the Civil War, and it shows in the way a lot of northern cities are segregated into neighborhoods.

Different sides of the same turd I suppose.
2013-11-09 01:39:20 PM  
1 votes:
This seems somewhat lifted from "Albion's Seed."
2013-11-09 01:33:33 PM  
1 votes:
www.city-data.com

/oblig
2013-11-09 01:26:19 PM  
1 votes:

gfid: What a stupid farking article.  I've lived in 3 of those "nations" and you know what?  They're all pretty much the same.   You might spot a few differences here and there, but its all the same goddamned country basically especially when you consider how freely many of us move about it.  I've lived in 4 different states - 6 different metropolitan areas.  I won't even break down how many actual cities.

I've also been to all 11 of those "nations".  Some of them have unique qualities.  The weather varies more than the people, but we're all the same country.  I love how people make fun of Texas, Arizona and Florida, but do you realize that a whole lot of residents of those states weren't even born there?  When I lived in AZ, I never actually met a native.  I met people from California, Mexico, Idaho, Wyoming, but nobody who was actually born there.


The article didn't do Woodward and his book justice. It isn't that the different parts of America are completely alien to each other, it's that there are differences between the regions and Woodward explains what those differences are and why they happened.

I think you overestimate how much people move around because you're in the class of people that do move around a lot. The majority of people still stay close to where they grew up. Not necessarily in the same town, but in the same region.

People also tend to be attracted to places that mirror their values. Arizona is a great example of this: there are whole cities of conservative old people that moved there from out of state. Yes, the weather is good, but they're also attracted by the low taxes and conservative values in local governance. So even the people coming from out of state perpetuate the cultural values of the area.
2013-11-09 01:15:44 PM  
1 votes:
But can we agree that the South indeed sucks and that we'd be better off if Tex-ass secedes?

// The rest of the nation's collective IQ would increase, and its BMI would decrease.  Win-win!
2013-11-09 01:06:54 PM  
1 votes:

gfid: What a stupid farking article.  I've lived in 3 of those "nations" and you know what?  They're all pretty much the same.   You might spot a few differences here and there, but its all the same goddamned country basically especially when you consider how freely many of us move about it. 
...
People say the South is racist, but I never saw racism until I lived in a Northern state and then it was both black on white and white on black racism.



I lived in the 'deep south' region (Tampa Bay, Florida and the Florida Panhandle) for 15 years. I've been living in the upper New England for two years now. I've found that the Deep Southers are more open about their racism - one of my ex-husband's friends loudly exclaimed, "Hey, who let those n****** in here?" at a restaurant one evening. However, at least where I live in New England, racism is just as rampant, but not as loudly proclaimed. And yes, it goes both ways up here: whites to hispanics and hispanics to whites.
2013-11-09 01:05:10 PM  
1 votes:
Southern Ontario is in the same region as the Oklahoma Panhandle.  Right.   I live in the former and visit the latter annually (shout out to the Okie-Tex StarParty!!) and the people and the culture in the two areas couldn't possibly be more different.

Probably a mistake to try to include Canada in the map.
2013-11-09 01:05:07 PM  
1 votes:

Mouren: Anyone got a version of the map that is actually legible?
/no I'm not old get off my lawn


4.bp.blogspot.com
If that still isn't big enough for you, here's the link
2013-11-09 12:59:58 PM  
1 votes:
Far West.  Although I think the Canadian parts of that are far, far different from the US parts.
2013-11-09 12:59:13 PM  
1 votes:

Lor M. Ipsum: gfid: People say the South is racist, but I never saw racism until I lived in a Northern state and then it was both black on white and white on black racism.

I agree with everything else you say but this.  I saw plenty of racism when I lived in northwest Florida, both white-on-black and black-on-white.  One did not have to look far.

However, I've also lived in rural Michigan and have not seen a lick of racism, but I might attribute that to the lack of racial diversity in those areas.  I would imagine it to be different in the more urban areas.


Anecdotal isn't a good measure. I worked industrial growing up, mostly poor laborers. Nearly all of our African-Americans were northern transplants, and to a wo/man they said racism was far worse in whatever northern area they'd come from than it was here. I live in Nashville; large mix of transplants, so not as much overt racism of any kind. Go 30 miles in any direction and it's vastly different.

My experiences in northern cities have been riddled with extremely nice people - until I mention I'm from the south (I have no accent); then the bigotry is palpable. I'm not saying the south is better; I'm white and I recommend you don't go anywhere in rural Appalachia, no matter your ethnicity. If you aren't local, the best you can hope for is to be treated like crap.
2013-11-09 12:55:45 PM  
1 votes:
img708.imageshack.us
2013-11-09 12:55:02 PM  
1 votes:

costermonger: Apparently Midlands, but I don't quite see the link between this part of Canada and that part of the US.


Yeah the author apparently equates eastern Nebraska, eastern South and North Dakota, the Oklahoma pan-handle, and a large chunk of Iowa with places like Philadelphia, Baltimore, Toronto, St. Louis, Columbus. Seems like a pretty stupid generalization to me.
2013-11-09 12:53:19 PM  
1 votes:

basemetal: I live in the great Chickasaw Nation........


Joe Strummer and I, we be Mescaleros.
2013-11-09 12:50:04 PM  
1 votes:

gfid: What a stupid farking article.  I've lived in 3 of those "nations" and you know what?  They're all pretty much the same.   You might spot a few differences here and there, but its all the same goddamned country basically especially when you consider how freely many of us move about it.  I've lived in 4 different states - 6 different metropolitan areas.  I won't even break down how many actual cities.

I've also been to all 11 of those "nations".  Some of them have unique qualities.  The weather varies more than the people, but we're all the same country.  I love how people make fun of Texas, Arizona and Florida, but do you realize that a whole lot of residents of those states weren't even born there?  When I lived in AZ, I never actually met a native.  I met people from California, Mexico, Idaho, Wyoming, but nobody who was actually born there.

People say the South is racist, but I never saw racism until I lived in a Northern state and then it was both black on white and white on black racism.

And yet for the most part, most people were decent.  There are some really shiatty places in the US, but there are a lot of good people living in those shiatty places.  I don't really know why, but it's probably because they were born there and just couldn't figure out that they could move or maybe they didn't have the money to move.


or the short version of the article: a map of how the author imagines the world to be
2013-11-09 12:49:18 PM  
1 votes:
The book is a good read.

Left coast, bordering El Norte and the Far West. The weather is lovely today.
2013-11-09 12:49:06 PM  
1 votes:
It was an interesting concept thirty years ago when Joel Garreau of the Post wrote Nine Nations. I don't see this adding anything new to the discussion.
2013-11-09 12:45:31 PM  
1 votes:
Protectorate of the Outer Banks or the  Confederation of American States, depending on what year it is.
2013-11-09 12:29:11 PM  
1 votes:
This idea was stupid when it was a book a couple of years ago, and it's stupid now.

I can only assume the author is Map Porn Redditor and/or D&D maphead, who is trying to apply their love of maps to reimagine the US. Because 'far fetched' doesn't begin to cover it.
2013-11-09 10:43:24 AM  
1 votes:
Where is Land of the Carpetbaggers?
 
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