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(Washington Post)   New report says the CIA paid AT&T $10 million a year for overseas phone records. Which works out to a little more than $3 million for each call that actually went through   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 28
    More: Scary, CIA, telephone tapping, CIA paid, Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, law enforcement agencies, CIA reportedly  
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1224 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Nov 2013 at 8:39 AM (36 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



28 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-11-09 08:42:25 AM
I want my taxes back.
 
2013-11-09 08:57:18 AM
See?
Obviously the Telcos were forced to cooperate!


/Big C for the win!!
 
2013-11-09 08:57:30 AM
At what point *does* a president have to say: 'I'm sorry'?
 
2013-11-09 08:57:45 AM
And when they run short of money they close museums and national parks ?
 
2013-11-09 09:04:49 AM
These are just paranoid conspiracy theories
 
2013-11-09 09:09:47 AM
www.corp.att.com
The "Death Star" logo was certainly prophetic, wasn't it?
 
2013-11-09 09:16:33 AM
I don't really care if our government spies on foreigners. It is not acceptable for them to spy on us. I know Obama (and thus the Total Fark left for the next few years at least) do not care about the Constitution or rule of law, but these things matter.
 
2013-11-09 09:29:48 AM
Why didn't the CIA just ask the NSA for the info?
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-11-09 09:30:06 AM
Coming on a Bicycle: At what point *does* a president have to say: 'I'm sorry'?

When the CIA's web site crashes.
 
2013-11-09 09:40:29 AM

Wrencher: Why didn't the CIA just ask the NSA for the info?


Because parochialism. Inter-agency cooperation could have thwarted 9/11, but we just can't have that, can we?
 
2013-11-09 09:51:52 AM
I wish the government were as eager to provide healthcare and improve job creation as they are to spy on every person on the planet.
 
2013-11-09 10:14:33 AM

phamwaa: Because parochialism. Inter-agency cooperation could have thwarted 9/11, but we just can't have that, can we?


Nope.  It was a much better idea to create a whole NEW uncooperative agency!
 
2013-11-09 10:21:07 AM

Coming on a Bicycle: At what point *does* a president have to say: 'I'm sorry'?


When a majority of Americans actually see something wrong with it.

Look I hate it, but let's be real here; every poll that isn't, "Do you think Barry fartbongo should be allowed to spy on his political enemies' phone calls," I have seen has a slim majority of Americans either okay with it or, "I don't care, whatever, need to go to work because I'm poor."

And when it does't, all it takes is the merest whisper of terrorism to tip the scale.

fark, Obama STILL has a better track record with his "signing statement" of the NDAA than most folk.
 
2013-11-09 10:31:27 AM
would you prefers they gave it away free?  option 2 is a blanket  FISA warrant so they get all the info and AT&T does the work  for free
 
2013-11-09 10:35:02 AM
Only $10 million?  Kudos to the CIA for getting a nice bargain there.
 
2013-11-09 10:39:25 AM
Good one subby.
 
2013-11-09 10:40:30 AM
a million here and another million there and pretty soon it adds up to a lot of money
 
2013-11-09 10:45:46 AM

SpdrJay: I want my taxes back.

 
2013-11-09 11:24:47 AM

Wrencher: Why didn't the CIA just ask the NSA for the info?



The NSA would have charged twice as much, and the CIA would have to be home from 8 am - 6 pm.

And they'd park on the lawn.

And play radio very loud while working.

And then complain the wiring was all wrong.

And there'd be mysterious surcharges for the War of 1812, the Spanish-American War, the War on Drugs, and the War on Poor People (formerly known as the War on Poverty).
 
2013-11-09 11:54:31 AM
Old Idea is Old

Clinton-era FBI stymied by that whole Reasonable Search problem did laid the groundwork. Paid Equifax a whole lot of zeroes to build Choicepoint. Then  bought American's personal information on the 'open market'.
 
2013-11-09 12:14:17 PM

phamwaa: Wrencher: Why didn't the CIA just ask the NSA for the info?

Because parochialism. Inter-agency cooperation could have thwarted 9/11, but we just can't have that, can we?


No, in fact, we can't. Or at least we shouldn't.

For some retarded, chickenshiat reason, "we" granted certain Federal agencies greater leeway in surveillance than domestic law enforcement laws permit and domestic judicial evidentiary rules would allow. The one sane safeguard was the stipulation that information acquired by those means could absolutely never be "shared" with agencies who are *not* granted such leeway. Were such sharing permitted, it would very likely become commonplace for the excused agencies to perform unconstitutional evidence mining on behalf of the restricted agencies.

We should never have granted the leeway in the first place. It was a foregone conclusion that the same authoritarian, stateist pricks who pushed that would eventually push for the "firewalls" to be destroyed.
 
2013-11-09 12:17:24 PM

JosephFinn: Only $10 million?  Kudos to the CIA for getting a nice bargain there.


So, in this river of chit, that one turd is fact?

Are you not cute!
 
2013-11-09 01:10:17 PM

DoctorCal: The one sane safeguard was the stipulation that information acquired by those means could absolutely never be "shared" with agencies who are *not* granted such leeway. Were such sharing permitted, it would very likely become commonplace for the excused agencies to perform unconstitutional evidence mining on behalf of the restricted agencies.


Yet we still have this "parallel construction" BS where law enforcement (the DEA has been the most notable client - look up "Special Operations Division") gets tipped by the NSA using information that would be thrown out of any courtroom on the basis of the Fourth Amendment, but it's okay because the aforementioned law enforcement folks simply manufacture a situation that will stand up to legal scrutiny and conveniently forget to tell the court about the illegal evidence that got the ball rolling.

Yes, I know I mentioned the NSA and not the CIA, but the end result is the same.
 
2013-11-09 01:32:46 PM
I thought the amount was quite cheap, given the risk in lost trust. Then again, I never trusted those bastages anyway.
 
2013-11-09 01:44:59 PM
That's not corporate welfare!  It's corporate work-fare!
 
2013-11-09 02:19:08 PM

born_yesterday: phamwaa: Because parochialism. Inter-agency cooperation could have thwarted 9/11, but we just can't have that, can we?

Nope.  It was a much better idea to create a whole NEW uncooperative agency!


"One Agency to rule them all, One Agency to find them; One Agency to bring them all
and in the darkness bind them."
 
2013-11-09 03:30:03 PM
Would a rational person suspect that some of the "hacked and stolen" information/files of largish corporate data bases we hear of in the news are actually disguised "purchases"?
OK, how about, "most of the time"?
 
2013-11-09 08:38:31 PM
www.themplsegotist.com
Is it better to pay more for overseas phone records, or less.
 
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