If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Stanford University)   Stanford professor who warned of the perils of multitasking collapses, dies at the end of a wilderness hike. If only he had a device to monitor his vital signs or at least allowed him to contact first responders for quick assistance   (news.stanford.edu) divider line 35
    More: Sad, Stanford University, first responders, oxygen monitor, South Lake Tahoe, Center for Automotive Research, wilderness, navigation system, Teaneck  
•       •       •

3294 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Nov 2013 at 11:23 AM (23 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



35 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-11-09 11:32:18 AM
55? Sounds like he should have written about the perils of not having an anti-aging program.
 
2013-11-09 11:34:17 AM
Dying at 55 doesn't mean you didn't live well.
 
2013-11-09 11:37:48 AM
Go on and write me up for 125
Post my face, wanted dead or alive
Take my license, all that jive
I can't live past 55, oh no, uh
 
2013-11-09 11:43:07 AM
newsimg.bbc.co.uk
 
2013-11-09 11:53:11 AM
Fark.

Nass was one of the best. I only got to interact with him briefly at a tutorial, many years ago, but he was one of those people who can change your whole life with a short conversation. He upended some of my biggest assumptions.

I only hope his more recent efforts to tame multitasking had gotten far enough along to take root. Anybody can whine about a problem (hello, boobies), but he demonstrated a remarkable ability to point out new solutions. God knows we need new solutions to multitasking.
 
2013-11-09 11:56:44 AM
His whole thing about multi...


Seventeen and three fourths.

May 19th, I think.

Twice, but the second time was lame.

Now, what???
 
2013-11-09 11:57:50 AM
Go Ducks!
 
2013-11-09 11:59:19 AM
He was also a professional magician.
 
2013-11-09 11:59:59 AM
I was listening to a story about this guy's work and thoughts the other day. Very interesting stuff, and I agree with him on most of it. I don't think we're adapted to living in a digital world, with all this information coming at us much faster than we can process it, any more than we're adapted to live in most of the ways that modern life forces on us. We just don't notice it, since it all comes at us gradually and we think that we're handling it fine. That's why we like to do so many drugs.
 
2013-11-09 12:00:02 PM

jfarkinB: Fark.

Nass was one of the best. I only got to interact with him briefly at a tutorial, many years ago, but he was one of those people who can change your whole life with a short conversation. He upended some of my biggest assumptions.

I only hope his more recent efforts to tame multitasking had gotten far enough along to take root. Anybody can whine about a problem (hello, boobies), but he demonstrated a remarkable ability to point out new solutions. God knows we need new solutions to multitasking.


Boobies often distract me too.
 
2013-11-09 12:02:58 PM
Yes, the real threat to your health is putting down the cell phone and going for a hike.

The key to a long and happy life is texting while eating while smoking while driving.
 
2013-11-09 12:03:01 PM

HighlanderRPI: Go on and write me up for 125
Post my face, wanted dead or alive
Take my license, all that jive
I can't live past 55, oh no, uh


That deserves a nice golf clap.
 
2013-11-09 12:05:32 PM

jfarkinB: Fark.

Nass was one of the best. I only got to interact with him briefly at a tutorial, many years ago, but he was one of those people who can change your whole life with a short conversation. He upended some of my biggest assumptions.

I only hope his more recent efforts to tame multitasking had gotten far enough along to take root. Anybody can whine about a problem (hello, boobies), but he demonstrated a remarkable ability to point out new solutions. God knows we need new solutions to multitasking.


An actual CSB. I've never heard of him, but reading the article and your take on him makes me want to hear more from the man. Any suggestions?
 
2013-11-09 12:16:57 PM
Yeah submitter. Everyone -I- KNOW always goes hiking with a cardiac monitor capable of acquiring and transmitting a 12 lead EKG, a Portable cTn1 and CPK-MB testing system, AND a cath lab in their backpack.
 
2013-11-09 12:20:30 PM
What I don't understand is people who say they hate smartphones because they are then forced to do things with it all the time and talk to people constantly. I can't understand why they just don't use their phone only when they have to for important things instead of playing Candy Crush and updating Facebook while watching a movie or doing heart surgery.
 
2013-11-09 12:27:07 PM
You know, if you just glance at it, the word "perils" looks like the word "penis". That makes this headline a bit more interesting.
 
2013-11-09 12:28:04 PM
Yes this is sad, but a perfect lost opportunity for the Ironic tag.
 
2013-11-09 12:30:08 PM

you_idiot: You know, if you just glance at it, the word "perils" looks like the word "penis". That makes this headline a bit more interesting.


Is the Penis of Multitasking some kind of alternative D&D artifact?
 
2013-11-09 12:33:23 PM
He died doing what he loved: not multi-tasking. At least I hope not. I hope we don't find out that he posted one last tweet: "Beautiful hike. Chest hurtaarrrgghghghghghghg"
 
2013-11-09 12:53:13 PM

www.myplay.com


RIP Solitary Man

 
2013-11-09 12:53:36 PM
Yes, but I bet his death was focused, efficient and unstressed.
So there's that. Which is nice.
 
2013-11-09 12:56:47 PM
So how did minimal tasking work out for him?
 
2013-11-09 01:26:35 PM
i-cdn.phonearena.com
 
2013-11-09 01:30:57 PM
Being against multitasking doesn't mean you don't carry a cell phone or run background apps on it. It means not stepping in front of an oncoming train because you're busy updating your Facebook page with your homework assignment via twitter.
 
2013-11-09 01:46:58 PM
Stanford professor? I'm OK with his obituary. RIP
 
2013-11-09 01:52:39 PM
Too bad he hadn't his amateur radio licence. Not that that matters a whole lot; one must be able to use the radio for it to do any good a-tall. Am licenced, own at least 2 HTs am unable to use as they decline to be set up for use.  Been advised but not ordered to surrender own licence.  boo hisss
 
2013-11-09 02:08:32 PM
I'm guessing he was pretty good at multitasking considering he earned an MA in 1985 and a PhD in 1986,  his first two peer-reviewed publications were in 1985 and 1986.     Since then, he had about 120 peer-reviewed publications, 23 book chapters, and 3 books.  Very few of his articles are solo- or first-authored, so he clearly enjoyed collaborating and lending his knowledge to a lot of manuscripts that came across his desk.   He has received considerable grant awards from the likes of Google, Volkswagen, Nokia, SAP, Samsung, Toyota, Nissan, Time-Warner, and Microsoft.   He even has a few patents and inventions.

http://www.stanford.edu/~nass/CliffNassVita.pdf

R.I.P. Super-smart dude!
 
2013-11-09 03:03:40 PM

Candy Colored Clown: An actual CSB. I've never heard of him, but reading the article and your take on him makes me want to hear more from the man. Any suggestions?


I bought and benefited from The Media Equation. I've meant to check out some of his more recent books, but haven't yet done so.

My own background is in human-computer interaction -- task analysis/modeling for my academic work, UI development to put food on the table, but mostly from the programming (machine) side. His work didn't seem immediately relevant to mine, but it made my shift my perspective not only on the systems I was building, but the systems I was using. It also made me think a lot differently about human performance, as opposed to the stories we tell ourselves while we're using systems.
 
2013-11-09 04:13:57 PM
I can expirate carbon monoxide while ejaculating semen simultaneously, and I don't even have to think about it.
 
2013-11-09 04:40:08 PM
I'm not sure what his research about multitasking has to do with having a heart attack at a campground less than five miles from a hospital, but go ahead and make your pointless point, subby.
 
2013-11-09 04:41:32 PM

jfarkinB: Fark.

Nass was one of the best. I only got to interact with him briefly at a tutorial, many years ago, but he was one of those people who can change your whole life with a short conversation. He upended some of my biggest assumptions.

I only hope his more recent efforts to tame multitasking had gotten far enough along to take root. Anybody can whine about a problem (hello, boobies), but he demonstrated a remarkable ability to point out new solutions. God knows we need new solutions to multitasking.


I fail to see how boobies are a problem.
 
2013-11-09 05:03:12 PM

jfarkinB: Nass was one of the best. I only got to interact with him briefly at a tutorial, many years ago, but he was one of those people who can change your whole life with a short conversation. He upended some of my biggest assumptions.


I too had the good fortune to meet him professionally a couple of times, and correspond with him regularly  thereafter. (Introducing Cliff to the expression "shiat sandwich" to describe workplace evaluations is my claim to fame). One of his most remarkable virtues was how generous he was with his time. He and I had a number of mutual friends, and they all feel the same way about him.

Here's the thing I admire most about him: a few years after writing The Media Equation and Wired for Speech, he realized that he had mined out his particular avenue of research. As he wrote in his final book The Man Who Lied To His Laptop, "I had gotten very good at doing things I had become less interested in." He could easily have coasted for the remainder of his career, living off of the discoveries he had already made and consulting for industry, but instead he chose to pivot, flipped his methodology around, and started using computers to research how people relate to each other. He promptly established an even greater reputation in that field.
 
2013-11-09 05:08:38 PM

Candy Colored Clown: An actual CSB. I've never heard of him, but reading the article and your take on him makes me want to hear more from the man. Any suggestions?


For "popular" explanations of his work, start with The Media Equation and The Man Who Lied To His Laptop. One thing that both books have in common is the number of people who are convinced that the results don't apply to them personally, just to other people (they do).

For an academic paper on the multitasking problem, see Cognitive control in media multitasking, http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2009/08/21/0903620106.abstract (and probably elsewhere online too).
 
2013-11-09 06:52:39 PM

seelorq: He was also a professional magician.


A wizard never dies late, nor does he die early. He dies precisely when he means to.
 
2013-11-09 10:40:38 PM
different user name for different tasks
 
Displayed 35 of 35 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report