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(The Register)   The world's first gun 3D printed in metal. It's more accurate than factory made guns, especially in the hands of a convicted felon who hears voices   (theregister.co.uk) divider line 162
    More: Cool, El Reg, convicted felon, metals  
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13681 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Nov 2013 at 1:08 AM (45 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-09 12:08:47 AM
The springs aren't printed! HA! ARTICLE LOSES BY TKO.

:-|
 
2013-11-09 12:27:49 AM
They say it's more accurate, but I'm thinking they compared the performance of this gun to a random sample of the mass produced version. This gun has probably gotten a lot more love and attention than the average assembly line gun.

That said, handguns have been "accurate enough" for most uses for about 100 years or so now, so maybe it's all moot.
 
2013-11-09 01:10:08 AM
If QA didn't submit this, I'll be a sad panda.
 
2013-11-09 01:10:45 AM
Not as random or as clumsy as a blaster.
 
2013-11-09 01:10:48 AM

Fubini: That said, handguns have been "accurate enough" for most uses for about 100 years or so now, so maybe it's all moot.


Luddite. We have now reached the point where we can reproduce 19th century technology in a much more complex, expensive and resource-intensive way than before.

If that isn't the future you want to live in, well then I suggest you grab the next Virgin Galactic Space Ship to Moon Colony Gingrich.
 
2013-11-09 01:14:47 AM
In before... oh fark it, never mind. I'm going to bed.
 
2013-11-09 01:16:34 AM
It has to be heat treated, which is something most people don't have access to,  Probably around 1500 degrees F and  quenched by someone that knew metallurgy.  Not really worried about this until they can get past that part.
 
2013-11-09 01:20:19 AM
I hope that some quizzical asshole prints one out and commits suicide

:) :) :)

Happy times!
 
2013-11-09 01:20:20 AM
3.bp.blogspot.comi.chzbgr.com
 
2013-11-09 01:21:35 AM
This is just a company showing off its capabilities by making something sure to get it publicity. Their equipment is way beyond what a criminal could afford or even know how to operate. If someone were determined to make this type of gun themselves, it would probably be cheaper and faster to obtain standard machine tools and get training on how to use them.
 
2013-11-09 01:21:49 AM

Bigdogdaddy: It has to be heat treated, which is something most people don't have access to,  Probably around 1500 degrees F and  quenched by someone that knew metallurgy.  Not really worried about this until they can get past that part.


because we ALL have access to 3D metal printers in the first place
 
2013-11-09 01:23:49 AM
 
Zel
2013-11-09 01:28:06 AM
Bravo on the baited headline. Let's ban downloadable models because crazies could get around sale-prohibitions. Hillary 2016!

Piratebay has a 3d models section; where, I am quite sure, all models shall be posted(-en).
 
2013-11-09 01:29:52 AM
I'm sure the state legislatures that are anti-gun will ban 3d printers too.
 
2013-11-09 01:32:10 AM

cretinbob: and it only costs $1 million


Oh, look... My uncle is 1st in line to buy more than he needs.
 
2013-11-09 01:32:26 AM
Whatever. Print a house.
 
2013-11-09 01:35:01 AM
Was sorta wondering how they were going to string fire it considering the grip safety, but I see they took care of that.
 
2013-11-09 01:35:56 AM
3D printing is becoming very interesting in terms of capability and accessibility and potential problems (you wouldn't copy a what, again?), but a gun? Meh.
 
2013-11-09 01:37:06 AM
I'm SHOCKED that none of the folks I've got marked as 3-D printer fanatics have shown up in this thread yet.  I've got one dude marked as "Pissed his mommy and daddy didn't buy him a 3-D printed pony for his 5th birthday" who always shows up in these threads who is apparently MIA.  Imagine that -- a farker who's too busy on a random Friday night to grace us with his presence.
 
2013-11-09 01:37:14 AM
If you read some of the comments about the machine used to print the parts I believe the fun quote from someone at solidworks was that it cost more than their four years of tution to a private university. So not exactly something easily obtained and then the engineering that went into prototyping the parts was apparently a good number of highly skilled manhours. Definitely something that is a lot more about building the business for rapid prototyped gunparts and justifying the ffl they have than anything else.
 
2013-11-09 01:37:51 AM
So much for that.  Disregard my last post.
 
2013-11-09 01:42:01 AM
So instead of new inventions, this is all people care about with those printers.  They will be banned soon.
 
ecl
2013-11-09 01:44:48 AM
So would a 3d printed sniper rifle be any better or are those things already as close to perfect as you can get?
 
2013-11-09 01:45:02 AM
I'm more impressed when you can print an object that has a fraction of the parts of the original and the same functionality.
 
2013-11-09 01:45:42 AM

MrHappyRotter: So much for that.  Disregard my last post.


Yeah, was wondering who you could have farkied.
 
2013-11-09 01:47:19 AM
I think it is pretty neat. I know it was something they built to prove they could, and it is probably destined for a company display case. But I'd still really like to see it put through some arduous tests and side-by-side comparisons on the range.
 
2013-11-09 01:50:10 AM
It's probably stronger than some of the MIM junk out there.  .45 is good choice for these tests, as it is low pressure round.
 
2013-11-09 01:52:33 AM

wildcardjack: I'm more impressed when you can print an object that has a fraction of the parts of the original and the same functionality.


Since it is additive it should be a lot easier to lighten things up, for instance that 1911 frame could have really been trimmed down.
 
2013-11-09 01:52:42 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: Fubini: That said, handguns have been "accurate enough" for most uses for about 100 years or so now, so maybe it's all moot.

Luddite. We have now reached the point where we can reproduce 19th century technology in a much more complex, expensive and resource-intensive way than before.

If that isn't the future you want to live in, well then I suggest you grab the next Virgin Galactic Space Ship to Moon Colony Gingrich.


Flawless Victory
 
2013-11-09 01:53:01 AM
BFD.     I mean I guess it sounds cool from an engineering perspective, but last time I checked, those Asian-made 1911 pistol copies are $400 or even less.
 
2013-11-09 01:53:43 AM
The only parts there weren't printed were four small springs and the magazines.

I remember when magazines were printed, kindle was what you did with fire wood, and onions were sold in finer men's accessories departments in downtown stores. And guns and typewriters were made by the same company.
 
2013-11-09 01:54:22 AM
I'm going to 3D print a bullet proof vest to protect me.
 
2013-11-09 01:54:38 AM

tinyarena: Quantum Apostrophe: Fubini: That said, handguns have been "accurate enough" for most uses for about 100 years or so now, so maybe it's all moot.

Luddite. We have now reached the point where we can reproduce 19th century technology in a much more complex, expensive and resource-intensive way than before.

If that isn't the future you want to live in, well then I suggest you grab the next Virgin Galactic Space Ship to Moon Colony Gingrich.

Flawless Victory


Huh? QAs posts are nothing but fail and AIDS.
 
2013-11-09 01:54:56 AM

wildcardjack: I'm more impressed when you can print an object that has a fraction of the parts of the original and the same functionality.


Like this?
 http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/3dprinting.html#.Un3cEx a70 zU
 
2013-11-09 01:55:11 AM

wildcardjack: I'm more impressed when you can print an object that has a fraction of the parts of the original and the same functionality.


It's a neat tech cause of that. Hurts my head when a new technology comes out and the 'that's stupid and pointless' people yell louder that the 'hmm I wonder how I can use this to better my life' crowd. Luddites, Luddites everywhere.
 
2013-11-09 01:58:38 AM

wildcardjack: I'm more impressed when you can print an object that has a fraction of the parts of the original and the same functionality.


Are you talking about a handgun or in general? There are plenty of cases where a machine needs parts with widely differing elasticity, tensile strength, conductivity, or even sacrificial or replaceable parts.
 
2013-11-09 01:59:41 AM

BitwiseShift: The only parts there weren't printed were four small springs and the magazines.

I remember when magazines were printed, kindle was what you did with fire wood, and onions were sold in finer men's accessories departments in downtown stores. And guns and typewriters were made by the same company.


You are older than gun magazines?

Impressive.
 
2013-11-09 02:02:27 AM

Fubini: They say it's more accurate, but I'm thinking they compared the performance of this gun to a random sample of the mass produced version. This gun has probably gotten a lot more love and attention than the average assembly line gun.

That said, handguns have been "accurate enough" for most uses for about 100 years or so now, so maybe it's all moot.


Yeah, when it comes to 1911s you can buy something close to a Browning's original specs for $400 - $500, which had loose tolerances thus increased reliability in exchange for less accuracy.  Or you can spend a few grand on a very precise highly tuned model.  Considering the cost of their equipment and the time and care needed to manufacture this one, I wonder which it better compares to?
 
2013-11-09 02:02:43 AM
It's probably against the law to manufacture any type of pistol without a serial number.  I wonder if they broke the law just by making that if it doesn't have one?
 
2013-11-09 02:07:23 AM

Bigdogdaddy: It has to be heat treated, which is something most people don't have access to,  Probably around 1500 degrees F and  quenched by someone that knew metallurgy.  Not really worried about this until they can get past that part.


bag o' coal, leaf blower, bucket o' water
 
2013-11-09 02:07:37 AM
3D printers are an urban myth.

Ain't no sich thang.
 
2013-11-09 02:07:38 AM
This gun is the proof of concept: Firearms can be produced on 3D printers that are reliable and have excellent tolerance.

The next trick will be to design a firearm that can only be produced on a 3D printer that is an improvement upon current firearms. So your 3D printed gun has to be able to outclass Colt, Glock, Smith&Wesson and a dozen others. Can it be done today, more cheaply and and and the same volume as dedicated gun manufacturers? No.

The real trick is that 3D printer can also put out car parts, machine tools, specialty measurement gear, hand tools and a dozen other metal items all to a very high level of accuracy.Once the production rate can be increased from a boutique item to mass production levels a lot of tool and die companies are going to have a lot of trouble keeping up.
 
2013-11-09 02:07:55 AM

Bigdogdaddy: It's probably against the law to manufacture any type of pistol without a serial number.  I wonder if they broke the law just by making that if it doesn't have one?


You haven't been reading long have you or do you have ADD?
 
2013-11-09 02:09:53 AM

Bigdogdaddy: It's probably against the law to manufacture any type of pistol without a serial number.


Generally it's not, if it's manufactured for personal use and not for sale.
 
2013-11-09 02:10:24 AM
I'm okay with this. This is the sort of printing system that is too cumbersome for the home, so I'm not concerned there. However, the components it creates are FAR more precise, and far more functional, while wasting FAR less. There was an article a while back that detailed the creating of a plane's door hinge by using a 3D printer. The hinge they created was just as strong, but far lighter in weight due to shed weight in portions that didn't need excess metal, and could be reinforced using methods that simply don't work by the casting methods used normally. I'm waiting for Boeing to 3D-Print an engine for a jetliner. I'm estimating it'll weigh maybe Half the size of present engines.
 
2013-11-09 02:13:45 AM

Bigdogdaddy: It's probably against the law to manufacture any type of pistol without a serial number.  I wonder if they broke the law just by making that if it doesn't have one?


They aren't selling it or transferring it to anyone, and in the video they mentioned they were at their location in Austin where they hold their FFL. Also in the video you'll see the gun has a serial number.
 
2013-11-09 02:15:20 AM
As someone who just installed a Crimson Trace laser sight on my Glock 23, I would bet I have better accuracy for $750 (gun and sight) than a 3-d printed 1911, for a third the price.

It is like buying a Macbook.
 
2013-11-09 02:19:47 AM
Good.. goooood, I'll just keep buying lathes and mills while these dimwits are distracted with 3D printers.
 
2013-11-09 02:20:50 AM

vharshyde: I'm okay with this. This is the sort of printing system that is too cumbersome for the home, so I'm not concerned there. However, the components it creates are FAR more precise, and far more functional, while wasting FAR less. There was an article a while back that detailed the creating of a plane's door hinge by using a 3D printer. The hinge they created was just as strong, but far lighter in weight due to shed weight in portions that didn't need excess metal, and could be reinforced using methods that simply don't work by the casting methods used normally. I'm waiting for Boeing to 3D-Print an engine for a jetliner. I'm estimating it'll weigh maybe Half the size of present engines.


I expect parts manufacturing to continue to move over to 3D incrementally. We'll start with a product having 1-2 parts being manufactured with 3D printing and from there that number will increase. For a mass market item like a car that is a huge number of parts being kicked out annually.

I expect something as complex as a jet turbine will not be 100% 3D printed for a while. We don't have the printing capacity to manufacture items that large in the required volume.

What will be nice and interesting is that replacement parts will become much more available. If the part is on file it can be ordered, a print house will manufacture it and ship it to you. And the cost of tooling should be negligible so the cost of having one unit produced should not break the bank.
 
2013-11-09 02:23:35 AM
FTFA: This isn't the kind of kit you can have in your garage. The power requirements alone are well over what is available in residential neighborhoods and the printer itself is very expensive.

Bummer!
 
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