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(Science Magazine)   "This is the 6th year of the contest, which challenges scientists to explain their doctoral research through the medium of interpretive dance"   (news.sciencemag.org) divider line 13
    More: Strange, binary systems, Ph.D., atomic force microscopies, transducers, systems biology, peptides, gravitational wave, PhD student  
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715 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Nov 2013 at 11:02 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



13 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-11-08 10:23:10 AM  
I thought that "interpretive dance" was just some sub-standard nightclub boogying you do on a Youtube video to sanctimoniously announce that you quit your job.
 
2013-11-08 11:04:42 AM  
dudespaper.com
 
2013-11-08 11:06:56 AM  
some bomonti and there goes my evening...
 
2013-11-08 11:27:04 AM  
You know, it's too bad that there is such a cultural Wall of Separation between the humanities and the STEM fields.  It wasn't always that way.
 
2013-11-08 11:30:01 AM  
Why not defend your thesis in iambic pentameter?
 
2013-11-08 11:37:50 AM  
This is the best thing I have seen in a long time.

"Spacetime"!
 
2013-11-08 12:29:34 PM  
So something like this?

images2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-11-08 12:48:27 PM  

Lady Beryl Ersatz-Wendigo: You know, it's too bad that there is such a cultural Wall of Separation between the humanities and the STEM fields.  It wasn't always that way.


Though to be fair, I know a lot more engineers who can appropriately quote Shakespeare or speak intelligently on modern art than I do Art history majors who can make head or tails of a quadratic equation.  But over all you point is a good one, The most mind blowing things I have ever seen come from the intersection of Art and Science (like a sculpture that could only be seen fully  from space that used only coherent light and mirrors as the medium and took advantage of parallax effects to create its shape)

IF I ever win a big lottery I think I shall blow it all on creating a large research lab/artists colony where I will assemble a court of artists and scientists who get to live there rent free, on the sole condition that they all attend dinner together and talk about their work that day with each other
 
2013-11-08 01:11:03 PM  
I think they stole that idea from the IgNobel Prize Awards.
 
2013-11-08 01:11:39 PM  

Magorn: Lady Beryl Ersatz-Wendigo: You know, it's too bad that there is such a cultural Wall of Separation between the humanities and the STEM fields.  It wasn't always that way.

Though to be fair, I know a lot more engineers who can appropriately quote Shakespeare or speak intelligently on modern art than I do Art history majors who can make head or tails of a quadratic equation.  But over all you point is a good one, The most mind blowing things I have ever seen come from the intersection of Art and Science (like a sculpture that could only be seen fully  from space that used only coherent light and mirrors as the medium and took advantage of parallax effects to create its shape)

IF I ever win a big lottery I think I shall blow it all on creating a large research lab/artists colony where I will assemble a court of artists and scientists who get to live there rent free, on the sole condition that they all attend dinner together and talk about their work that day with each other


Would there be interociters?
 
2013-11-08 01:58:48 PM  
Interpretive dance.  Also called, "Flail about like an idiot and call it art."  With the added bonus of working via the same method psychics use.  "If you don't understand it, it's not my fault.  You're just not interpreting it right."

/feelin' get-off-my-lawnish today
 
2013-11-08 09:54:28 PM  
Are we really all so terribly, terribly jaded that we can't allow ourselves a moment to appreciate such a rich array of utter whimsy?

Personally, I have to go with "Multi-Axial Fatigue for Predicting Life of Mechanical Components," with second place going to "Understanding the Role of MYCN in Neuroblastoma using a Systems Biology Approach." Third to "Motility and Relational Mobility of the Baka in North-Eastern Gabon."

Honorable mention to "Biophysical characterization of transmembrane peptides using Fluorescence" for excellent use of duct tape and Bollywood themes. I wanted to love it, but they lost points for comic sans and gratuitous smilies.
 
2013-11-09 05:23:02 AM  

Lady Beryl Ersatz-Wendigo: You know, it's too bad that there is such a cultural Wall of Separation between the humanities and the STEM fields.  It wasn't always that way.


How well I remember Einstein's fan dance.

*sigh*
 
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