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(BBC)   Brazil says: We weren't spying. We were only trying to see if *you* were spying   (bbc.co.uk ) divider line
    More: Followup, United States, United Nations General Assembly, intelligence assessment  
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2361 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Nov 2013 at 1:16 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



23 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-11-07 01:20:44 PM  
uh huh.
 
2013-11-07 01:21:33 PM  
One more Brazil!! One more Brazil!!
 
2013-11-07 01:23:09 PM  
One more for the trifecta.
 
2013-11-07 01:23:44 PM  
It's as much different as it is the same. I spy a load of horsepoopy.
 
2013-11-07 01:24:17 PM  
Lol -- it's not a double-standard when we do it.

/ I'm shocked -- SHOCKED -- that countries are spying on each-other!
 
2013-11-07 01:24:45 PM  
How many trifectas are there in a brazillian?
 
2013-11-07 01:25:29 PM  
We've forfeited the right to be upset about spying.
 
2013-11-07 01:26:21 PM  
Systematically sucking up GLOBAL communications including that of you own citizens is exactly the same as watching foreign intel personnel move around your country.

Its hilarious that this is being used as a SEE EVERYONE DOES IT excuse

My Father was an FBI Special Agent. His job was to follow these exact people when in the US. Following foreign assets in country is what responsible countries do. Datamining global communications and storing them for later use IS NOT
 
2013-11-07 01:26:41 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org

*Spies
 
2013-11-07 01:29:03 PM  

Iknhaton: We've forfeited the right to be upset about spying.


Anyone who is legitimately upset about sovereign states spying on each other is naive.  I don't have a problem with spying or counterintelligence, but I also don't have a problem with pointing out hypocrisy and feigning outrage in response to other countries who complain about the NSA.
 
2013-11-07 01:30:44 PM  

Iknhaton: We've forfeited the right to be upset about spying.


As I've said all along, literally every country with the money to do so (and most that don't) has a spy program.  People are deluding themselves if they think theirs doesn't.  It's a standard part of international politics.  At this point, it's really only reasonable to feign outrage and get to figuring out how to stop the other guys.
 
2013-11-07 01:30:46 PM  
I was assured that US spying was different and that other countries would never do such a thing and their people will stop buying our products as a result.
 
2013-11-07 01:31:14 PM  
No government has a right to get on a high horse about this shiat.
 
2013-11-07 01:32:28 PM  

Iknhaton: We've forfeited the right to be upset about spying.


So far, the only ones complaining about US spying are those who forfeited that right as well. The rest aren't worth spying on and are therefore not complaining.
 
2013-11-07 01:33:19 PM  

vygramul: I was assured that US spying was different and that other countries would never do such a thing and their people will stop buying our products as a result.


Well, to the extent that the NSA spies on Americans without judicial oversight, that is different.  That's illegal according to US law.
 
2013-11-07 01:33:55 PM  
The scoreboard on this is:

Ed Snowden: Works for the Russian Government now.

Brazil: Also spying on us.
 
2013-11-07 01:34:33 PM  

jshine: Iknhaton: We've forfeited the right to be upset about spying.

Anyone who is legitimately upset about sovereign states spying on each other is naive.  I don't have a problem with spying or counterintelligence, but I also don't have a problem with pointing out hypocrisy and feigning outrage in response to other countries who complain about the NSA.


This is really the point. Everyone does it. It's ridiculous that people are surprised to find out the US spies on EVERYBODY. What happened in Brazil is not a difference of type, only a matter of degree. If another nation had the same capability do spy, they would exercise it. Any politician that speaks in outrage is a hypocrite.

This doesn't mean I agree with the NSA tactics, but I also recognize that they are the first to be burned at the stake if they miss something.
 
2013-11-07 01:40:42 PM  

BetterMetalSnake: jshine: Iknhaton: We've forfeited the right to be upset about spying.

Anyone who is legitimately upset about sovereign states spying on each other is naive.  I don't have a problem with spying or counterintelligence, but I also don't have a problem with pointing out hypocrisy and feigning outrage in response to other countries who complain about the NSA.

This is really the point. Everyone does it. It's ridiculous that people are surprised to find out the US spies on EVERYBODY. What happened in Brazil is not a difference of type, only a matter of degree. If another nation had the same capability do spy, they would exercise it. Any politician that speaks in outrage is a hypocrite.

This doesn't mean I agree with the NSA tactics, but I also recognize that they are the first to be burned at the stake if they miss something.


You mean how they have burned at the stake for missing Boston Marathon Bombing, 9/11 and the Cole and all the other successful attacks ? Ya thats what I thought.

They have no accountability to anyone. The Politicians take the hits for their failures not the NSA. They just keep on keeping on.

The reality of all of this is that the NSA is more than likely using their vast resources not for protecting the country but to gain advantages on the global economic front. And if true as has been shown by them spying on businesses and private markets around the globe the next question would be at whos request.

The sheer amount of public and private sector overlap in government and specifically in the intelligence community raises serious ethical questions as to who has access to this intel and for what purpose.
 
2013-11-07 01:56:25 PM  

kindms: BetterMetalSnake: jshine: Iknhaton: We've forfeited the right to be upset about spying.

Anyone who is legitimately upset about sovereign states spying on each other is naive.  I don't have a problem with spying or counterintelligence, but I also don't have a problem with pointing out hypocrisy and feigning outrage in response to other countries who complain about the NSA.

This is really the point. Everyone does it. It's ridiculous that people are surprised to find out the US spies on EVERYBODY. What happened in Brazil is not a difference of type, only a matter of degree. If another nation had the same capability do spy, they would exercise it. Any politician that speaks in outrage is a hypocrite.

This doesn't mean I agree with the NSA tactics, but I also recognize that they are the first to be burned at the stake if they miss something.

You mean how they have burned at the stake for missing Boston Marathon Bombing, 9/11 and the Cole and all the other successful attacks ? Ya thats what I thought.

They have no accountability to anyone. The Politicians take the hits for their failures not the NSA. They just keep on keeping on.

The reality of all of this is that the NSA is more than likely using their vast resources not for protecting the country but to gain advantages on the global economic front. And if true as has been shown by them spying on businesses and private markets around the globe the next question would be at whos request.

The sheer amount of public and private sector overlap in government and specifically in the intelligence community raises serious ethical questions as to who has access to this intel and for what purpose.


Actually, yeah. That's exactly what I mean. You still hear people talking about "intelligence failures" for 9-11 as well as the justification for the Iraq war. Every politician who had ever said anything on the topic threw that agency under the bus.

Of course, I don't know if anyone got fired. That's probably what you mean, and I can see your point (if I inferred correctly). The reality is that people making poor decisions at that level seldom get fired, short of being found in a math-fueled pedo-orgy. And this has less to say about intelligence services than it does about accountability.
 
2013-11-07 02:04:42 PM  

BetterMetalSnake: math-fueled pedo-orgy


www.chemistryland.com

/ hot
 
2013-11-07 02:51:31 PM  

kindms: BetterMetalSnake: jshine: Iknhaton: We've forfeited the right to be upset about spying.

Anyone who is legitimately upset about sovereign states spying on each other is naive.  I don't have a problem with spying or counterintelligence, but I also don't have a problem with pointing out hypocrisy and feigning outrage in response to other countries who complain about the NSA.

This is really the point. Everyone does it. It's ridiculous that people are surprised to find out the US spies on EVERYBODY. What happened in Brazil is not a difference of type, only a matter of degree. If another nation had the same capability do spy, they would exercise it. Any politician that speaks in outrage is a hypocrite.

This doesn't mean I agree with the NSA tactics, but I also recognize that they are the first to be burned at the stake if they miss something.

You mean how they have burned at the stake for missing Boston Marathon Bombing, 9/11 and the Cole and all the other successful attacks ? Ya thats what I thought.

They have no accountability to anyone. The Politicians take the hits for their failures not the NSA. They just keep on keeping on.

The reality of all of this is that the NSA is more than likely using their vast resources not for protecting the country but to gain advantages on the global economic front. And if true as has been shown by them spying on businesses and private markets around the globe the next question would be at whos request.

The sheer amount of public and private sector overlap in government and specifically in the intelligence community raises serious ethical questions as to who has access to this intel and for what purpose.


Since the NSA was seriously beefed up in a direct response to 9/11...    I'm not sure what your point is, exactly.

As for missing the Tsarnaev brothers - either it means they're damned incompetent at spying on US citizens or they're really serious about not looking at data they believed to have come from US citizens. (Or both, I suppose...)
 
2013-11-08 10:44:42 AM  
EVERY nation on earth devotes as many resources as possible towards spying on EVERY OTHER nation it believes it needs to.

For the United States to do otherwise would be grossly irresponsible, and our past failures to do so have led to disastrous consequences.
 
2013-11-08 03:38:44 PM  

Iknhaton: We've forfeited the right to be upset about spying.


But not hypocrisy ;-)
 
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