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(BBC)   DNA needed from 100,000 volunteers, say researchers at the University of Your Mom   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 24
    More: Interesting, DNA, UK Personal Genome Project, public good, informed consent, bioethics, volunteers, nucleic acid sequence, your mom  
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2753 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Nov 2013 at 2:06 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



24 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-11-07 02:01:30 PM  
*Hork, spit*
 
2013-11-07 02:09:02 PM  
And exactly what form of my DNA do they want?
 
2013-11-07 02:15:00 PM  
HOTY! for 13 year olds!
I laughed.
 
2013-11-07 02:18:48 PM  
csb

I already know the SNP profile for each of my parents out to 700,000+ SNPs. I know my own mtDNA sequence. I know 25 of my DYS microsatellite repeat allele values.

/csb
 
2013-11-07 02:25:15 PM  
Can't they just get it from the NSA, MI5?
 
2013-11-07 02:32:32 PM  
99,999 volunteers.  They already started with Suzanne Vega a long time ago.
 
2013-11-07 02:35:12 PM  
I'd volunteer for that. It's not like I am going to have any children who might be negatively impacted by revealing my genetics. Not to mention "threat of cloning" would be the only way I could pass on my genes.
 
2013-11-07 02:36:35 PM  
23andme.com - should just approach them for data.
 
2013-11-07 02:38:01 PM  
Too bad it is only for the UK. I have no qualms about participating--despite their warning that someone with sufficient knowledge could create synthetic DNA identical to mine and plant it at a crime scene....
 
2013-11-07 02:44:02 PM  
dnrtfa but laughed until I started coughing when I read the headline.
 
2013-11-07 02:49:29 PM  
Great.  There's the next big Facebook app in the making!  :-P
 
2013-11-07 02:49:52 PM  

Deedeemarz: Too bad it is only for the UK. I have no qualms about participating--despite their warning that someone with sufficient knowledge could create synthetic DNA identical to mine and plant it at a crime scene....


Extra defence.

If you're ever charged and arrested you can claim your DNA had been duplicated and it isn't your semen found inside the golden retriever.
 
2013-11-07 03:04:23 PM  
How'bout no
 
2013-11-07 03:12:03 PM  
Sometimes the lowest form of humor can be the most amusing.

HOTM candidate.
 
2013-11-07 03:13:56 PM  
Doesn't matter where this is, but I bet the NSA is watching extremely close.
 
2013-11-07 03:28:23 PM  
I thought 23 & Me had this covered. I just mailed my spit on Tuesday.
 
2013-11-07 03:44:51 PM  

caddisfly: I thought 23 & Me had this covered. I just mailed my spit on Tuesday.


23 and me just looks at common variants in the population.  I think they're on the 100K or 500K SNP chip.

This is whole-genome resequencing, 3.2 billion base pairs.  I've only done whole-genome sequencing for worms and flies, but we usually need more DNA than what you get out of a loogie, and we need to be more conscientious about not contaminating it
 
2013-11-07 03:50:07 PM  
They can have a look at D's Nutz, not D's genes:)
 
2013-11-07 04:05:54 PM  
DNA needed from 100,000 volunteers, say researchers at the University of Your MomNSA
 
2013-11-07 04:59:39 PM  
DNA is a popular In-thing with amateur genealogists lately. You can get everything from very cheap tests that will identify a short sequence allowing you to place your direct male line forefather in a Haplotype group to more comprehensive medical  reports that will tell you about many risk factors or traits, as well as studies based exclusively on your X or Y chromosome, or mitochondrial DNA, to help you figure out where to look for ancestors who can't be located by documents alone.

Y chromosomes are useful to determine who your male line ancestors are (or aren't). They can expose adultery or adoptions or settle some questions where the male ancestor is in doubt.

The news is full of cases where historical personages or prehistoric remains have been connected to living descendants via gene sequencing of various kinds.

But for all their interest and usefulness, such DNA reports can be dangerous if they fall in to the wrong hands or are abused by the subject, their family, employers, scientists, and any number of other people.

A massive genetic-genealogical study has recently been completed with contains information from millions of people. In all likelihood, any person with European ancestor descends from a small group of mega-ancestors, so we are all touched by such a project. In fact, mathematicians, biologists and others have calculated that everybody is related to everybody else if you go back far enough. The figures vary, but for most people alive today, the Most Recent Common Ancestor of us all may have been alive in the 700s A.D., which is to say around the time of Charlemagne, who is one of the mega ancestors with millions of known descendants himself through two legitimate and at least 12 recognized illegitimate children.

Like genealogy, genetics is full of surprises, both wonderful and unpleasant, and can be used for many legitimate or illegitimate purposes.

The legal and moral implications are numerous, complex and difficult.

I would love to know my genome better, but I worry about the consequences if others know my genome better. Lord knows, I have given away far too much information about myself and others over the years, and you don't need genetics or genealogy if information falls into the hands of a crook, a loony or an enemy. The world is full of bigots, racists and ideologues, and any of these can be a threat regardless of what kind of handle they have on you or yours.

But in the end, the value of information is too great to entire control the flood of false or true information.

Some people like to know the sex of the fetus in the womb and some like to be surprised when the infant is born. It is the same with ancestors and medical information. It can be very useful to know that you carry a defective gene that may cause problems of a certain kind at a certain age or age range, but some people just don't want to know. They want their death to be a bit of a surprise as well as the sex of their first grandchild.

Also, like fortune tellers, it is probably unethical to tell a person they are going to die soon. If you are right, they may suffer, if you are wrong, they may sue. In worst case scenarios, they might commit a murder-suicide based on evidence that is faulty or only low probability, and then everybody suffers needlessly.

I would like to have information I can use for my own purposes, but I would want it to be secure so that even I could not accidentally divulge it to the wrong people or even the right people in the wrong way or at the wrong time.

I don't think I would risk joining such a study even if paid. Yes, it has great scientific and genealogical value, but the value may no equal the likely risks. Let somebody else do it, but even then, they are likely distant cousins of mine. Most people in England are probably 15th cousins or closer of the Royal Family. That seems quite distant but most or all people on Earth have been estimated at 35th to 50th cousins by various experts in various fields (mathematics, biology, genetics, genealogy, etc.) 15 generations is about 5 centuries, not that long ago genetically or geologically.

Imagine how many degrees of remove exist between you and a chimpanzee, or you and your dog, or you and a banana plant. Yet you share about 98-99% of your genes with the chimp, and possibly 10-25% with the banana. Many cellular functions and thus genes are virtually identical in man and mouse, or mouse and banana.
 
2013-11-07 06:12:11 PM  
Don't be fooled people! This is just a way for the super rich to create a directory of people with the exact DNA  matches of blood, marrow, organ, etc at their finger tips. Who will notice a few people disappearing or having "accidents" then missing a kidney or heart?

//I am not paranoid, just neurotic.
 
2013-11-07 07:00:04 PM  
*snert*

Good one subby. Made me laugh. +1
 
2013-11-07 07:54:25 PM  

pivazena: caddisfly: I thought 23 & Me had this covered. I just mailed my spit on Tuesday.

23 and me just looks at common variants in the population.  I think they're on the 100K or 500K SNP chip.

This is whole-genome resequencing, 3.2 billion base pairs.  I've only done whole-genome sequencing for worms and flies, but we usually need more DNA than what you get out of a loogie, and we need to be more conscientious about not contaminating it


Mailed my spit kit to 23andme yesterday. Might not be the whole sequencing but it'ill be a whole lot more info than I have now.

 It can be very useful to know that you carry a defective gene that may cause problems of a certain kind at a certain age or age range, but some people just don't want to know.

These people don't want to know what they are in for, but when it happens (because they didn't watch for early warning signs and take corrective steps) they will lament on how unfair life is, and cost the rest of us a but-load of money for their medical care.
 
2013-11-08 07:21:17 AM  
Done in one.
 
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