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(TreeHugger)   A bike-sharing program celebrating its five month anniversary in New York City is being called a success because so far nobody's been killed over it   (treehugger.com) divider line 76
    More: Spiffy, New York City, column inches, corpses  
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1310 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Nov 2013 at 10:37 AM (23 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-06 10:41:13 AM
Who maintains these bikes? I pass them all the time, never seen anyone with a broken bike.
 
2013-11-06 10:41:59 AM
Do they still have any bikes left, or have they all been stolen?

/didn't RTFA
 
2013-11-06 10:43:00 AM
I've ridden a bike in NYC, it's not as dangerous as you think.  Manhattan traffic averages about 15mph,  Most people who regularly drive in Manhattan are used to the chaos and look out for cyclists.  Riding a bike in suburban North Jersey is much more dangerous.
 
2013-11-06 10:44:50 AM

duffblue: Who maintains these bikes? I pass them all the time, never seen anyone with a broken bike.


I've seen guys in vans drive around to the bike stations, presumably for maintenance.  The bikes themselves also look like they're pretty solid.
 
2013-11-06 10:46:33 AM
blog.creditkarma.com
 
2013-11-06 10:47:24 AM
Bikers are more troublesome vermin in this city than the bedbugs and rats combined.

/the traffic laws apply to you farktards too
//get off the sidewalk
 
2013-11-06 10:48:07 AM
There have been bike sharing programs in several cities for years.

Put one in New York and suddenly it is national news and the rest of us have to listen to New Yorkers wonder at the novelty of it all.
 
2013-11-06 10:48:16 AM
In before 'cagers'
 
2013-11-06 10:51:07 AM

bikerific: There have been bike sharing programs in several cities for years.

Put one in New York and suddenly it is national news and the rest of us have to listen to New Yorkers wonder at the novelty of it all.


I seen them in parts of Chicago but, never seen anyone on one.
 
2013-11-06 10:51:35 AM
Insert picture of Road Rash here
-->
 
2013-11-06 10:51:44 AM
They have a bike-sharing program with the same bikes where I'm at now as they use in NYC. I ride my bike a lot, and so far I've noticed that the people renting bikes:

1) Never wear helmets.
2) Are scared to ride in traffic so they ride on the sidewalk, creating a huge hazard to pedestrians.
 
2013-11-06 10:53:49 AM

lilplatinum: Bikers are more troublesome vermin in this city than the bedbugs and rats combined.

/the traffic laws apply to you farktards too
//get off the sidewalk


There has not been a day caused by a cyclist in NYC since 2009. On the other hand, there were 274 motor vehicle related fatalities in 2012, distributed as 148 pedestrians, 18 cyclists, 35 motorcyclists, and 73 motor vehicle occupants.

Personal cars should be as welcome in Manhattan and Western Brooklyn as 7-11s.
 
2013-11-06 10:55:11 AM

bikerific: There have been bike sharing programs in several cities for years.

Put one in New York and suddenly it is national news and the rest of us have to listen to New Yorkers wonder at the novelty of it all.


I think it has more to do with the volume. Citibike reports something like 50k trips per day. The trucks going around are mainly to refill empty racks and empty full racks.

/disclaimer: I have an annual pass and wonder at the novelty of it
 
2013-11-06 10:55:31 AM

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: They have a bike-sharing program with the same bikes where I'm at now as they use in NYC. I ride my bike a lot, and so far I've noticed that the people renting bikes:

1) Never wear helmets.
2) Are scared to ride in traffic so they ride on the sidewalk, creating a huge hazard to pedestrians.


I've never used CITIBikes, but I've never seen anyone ride one on the sidewalk in the City.
 
2013-11-06 10:55:40 AM
Well, in NYC terms, that is success.

Of course, now they've jinxed it and tomorrow the news will be filled with stories about how a tourist in NYC was stabbed to death over a rental bike.
 
2013-11-06 10:56:16 AM

Moopy Mac: I've never used CITIBikes, but I've never seen anyone ride one on the sidewalk in the City.


Glad to hear New Yorkers are much better about it.
 
2013-11-06 11:00:19 AM

Moopy Mac: There has not been a day caused by a cyclist in NYC since 2009.


Well I guess as long as cyclist-involved incidents don't resolve in day [sic], we should just be happy about all the shiatheads ignoring traffic regulations and crashing into people in crosswalks.
 
2013-11-06 11:03:01 AM
Riding a bike in the road isn't as ad as I've read or people make it seem. Where I am drivers seem to be crazy and are the worst drivers you may see. But I road my bicycle all summer and shared the road with cars. Aside from a few close calls, I had no issues or accidents. I also followed the rules of the road most of the time as if I was driving a car so that may have helped me. All this in an area that's so-so about actual usable bicycle lanes.
 
DB
2013-11-06 11:03:43 AM
The whole thing seems to be working fine. It's widely used, no major injuries, hasn't farked up traffic. I expected a bunch of d-bags who don't know how to ride bikes but new yorkers know how to adjust to things just fine.
 
2013-11-06 11:03:46 AM
drjekel_mrhyde:

I seen them in parts of Chicago but, never seen anyone on one.

I worked downtown this summer, spitting distance from two stations. They're used plenty.

Now, excuse me, I'm bracing for a lot of comments from people shocked that infinity percent more people died in car crashes than on citibikes in the last five months. It's unsafe! Where are the helmets!  Vermin!
 
2013-11-06 11:04:14 AM
They have one on Market here in San Francisco. Market has one of the highest rates of bicycle accidents in the city, and San Francisco is known as one of the most dangerous places to bike in the country.
 
2013-11-06 11:06:27 AM

poot_rootbeer: Moopy Mac: There has not been a day caused by a cyclist in NYC since 2009.

Well I guess as long as cyclist-involved incidents don't resolve in day [sic], we should just be happy about all the shiatheads ignoring traffic regulations and crashing into people in crosswalks.


Yes of course, because in NYC every single traffic infraction committed by an automobile is caught and punished.
 
2013-11-06 11:10:08 AM

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: They have a bike-sharing program with the same bikes where I'm at now as they use in NYC. I ride my bike a lot, and so far I've noticed that the people renting bikes:

1) Never wear helmets.
2) Are scared to ride in traffic so they ride on the sidewalk, creating a huge hazard to pedestrians.


Do bike rentals also include helmet rental?  Because I would think that someone who doesn't own a bike is pretty unlikely to own a bike helmet.
 
2013-11-06 11:11:35 AM

GlobalThunder: Insert picture of Road Rash here
-->


I did a GIS, it was all pretty gross.
 
2013-11-06 11:12:33 AM

wxboy: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: They have a bike-sharing program with the same bikes where I'm at now as they use in NYC. I ride my bike a lot, and so far I've noticed that the people renting bikes:

1) Never wear helmets.
2) Are scared to ride in traffic so they ride on the sidewalk, creating a huge hazard to pedestrians.

Do bike rentals also include helmet rental?  Because I would think that someone who doesn't own a bike is pretty unlikely to own a bike helmet.


I'll tell you a little secret: if drivers were safer, helmets would be less important.

But that hardly dilutes your point. If there's a good way to secure helmets to the racks in such a way that they can't be freed by a pair of scissors, maybe it should be done.
 
2013-11-06 11:15:11 AM
By definition, an "anniversary" is a commemoration of an event that occurred on the same date in a previous year. A "five month anniversary" is therefore is as nonsensical a concept as is "states rights".
 
2013-11-06 11:15:22 AM
Yeesh.  They've had this in Barcelona for 6 years and the way people drive in Barcelona makes New York cabbies look like old women from Kansas.

So NYC has yet to turn into a socialist dystopian wasteland as the New York Post predicted.  What a surprise.
 
2013-11-06 11:18:23 AM

poot_rootbeer: Moopy Mac: There has not been a day caused by a cyclist in NYC since 2009.

Well I guess as long as cyclist-involved incidents don't resolve in day [sic], we should just be happy about all the shiatheads ignoring traffic regulations and crashing into people in crosswalks.


I don't even ride a bicycle very often and I'm not sure why I'm standing up for cyclists, other than all the nut jobs making up stories of widespread pedestrian injuries caused by people on bikes. But in some people's world, chappy autocorrect is worse than ignorance of real danger to pedestrians.

Stop reading the Post, or parroting those that do.
 
2013-11-06 11:22:13 AM

Komplex: poot_rootbeer: Moopy Mac: There has not been a day caused by a cyclist in NYC since 2009.

Well I guess as long as cyclist-involved incidents don't resolve in day [sic], we should just be happy about all the shiatheads ignoring traffic regulations and crashing into people in crosswalks.

Yes of course, because in NYC every single traffic infraction committed by an automobile is caught and punished.


LOL. In NYC you can literally rip off a tourist's leg while attempting to kill the cyclist on your hood and get off with "No criminality suspected". http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/10331086/B r itish-tourist-who-lost-leg-in-New-York-taxi-crash-says-her-life-was-tu rned-upside-down.html
 
2013-11-06 11:23:21 AM
^^ That is, if you are driving a car
 
2013-11-06 11:27:00 AM

Devo: San Francisco is known as one of the most dangerous places to bike in the country.


Got a cite for this? I was in SF this summer and biking there was a world of difference from here in Baltimore (although we have some good things coming for cyclists in the next year or so). Most lists of bike-friendly cities I've seen include SF near the top, despite the hills.
 
2013-11-06 11:27:06 AM

Moopy Mac: There has not been a day caused by a cyclist in NYC since 2009. On the other hand, there were 274 motor vehicle related fatalities in 2012, distributed as 148 pedestrians, 18 cyclists, 35 motorcyclists, and 73 motor vehicle occupants.


Not surprising since there are more cars and many of them go on these things called highways which are more conducive to fatal accidents.  But I don't believe for a second none of those 18 cyclists involvde in fatal accidents which you just noticed were all following all the traffic rules and had nothing to do with the incidents.

Personal cars should be as welcome in Manhattan and Western Brooklyn as 7-11s.

Hey, I agree - a car in this city is quite silly.  But then again, so is riding a children's toy for transportation when you happen to live in a city with the best 24 hour public transportation system on the continent.
 
2013-11-06 11:28:59 AM
Biggest issue is when bikes go the wrong way on one way streets - bastards.  Then again, it's usually the messengers doing this rather than tourists.
 
2013-11-06 11:32:22 AM

Reginald Maudling: But that hardly dilutes your point. If there's a good way to secure helmets to the racks in such a way that they can't be freed by a pair of scissors, maybe it should be done.


Folding Helmet

I've contributed to this kickstarter. It might make helmet rental vending machines near major bike hubs more feasible.
 
2013-11-06 11:34:02 AM

lilplatinum: Moopy Mac: There has not been a day caused by a cyclist in NYC since 2009. On the other hand, there were 274 motor vehicle related fatalities in 2012, distributed as 148 pedestrians, 18 cyclists, 35 motorcyclists, and 73 motor vehicle occupants.

Not surprising since there are more cars and many of them go on these things called highways which are more conducive to fatal accidents.  But I don't believe for a second none of those 18 cyclists involvde in fatal accidents which you just noticed were all following all the traffic rules and had nothing to do with the incidents.

Personal cars should be as welcome in Manhattan and Western Brooklyn as 7-11s.

Hey, I agree - a car in this city is quite silly.  But then again, so is riding a children's toy for transportation when you happen to live in a city with the best 24 hour public transportation system on the continent.


Very little of your post makes sense. Highways are not more conducive to fatal accidents; 148 pedestrian deaths make up the large majority of motor vehicle related deaths, and I don't think many of these pedestrians were on the  highway.

But I have a more interesting question, Clearly, you think all 18 cyclist deaths were due to mishandling by the cyclists and you have nothing to back this up. OK, got it.

How many auto drivers--radio blaring, vision obstructed by the car itself--do you think follow all the traffic laws perfectly every day? If I had to guess, like you do, I'd say there are a million billion more irresponsible auto drivers than cyclists. Probably definitely.
 
2013-11-06 11:35:40 AM

drjekel_mrhyde: bikerific: There have been bike sharing programs in several cities for years.

Put one in New York and suddenly it is national news and the rest of us have to listen to New Yorkers wonder at the novelty of it all.

I seen them in parts of Chicago but, never seen anyone on one.


Really? I live in Lincoln Park, work in Greektown, and spend a lot of time in other neighborhoods, and I see people using them all the time, even with the weather getting shiattier (not including this week's "heat wave."). Every station I pass usually has at least a few bikes taken out.

I wouldn't expect to see them in the more remote, spread out areas or high crime areas but overall I think the program has been successful.
 
2013-11-06 11:46:01 AM

fang06554: The trucks going around are mainly to refill empty racks and empty full racks.


So the cyclists are actually burning gasoline in bike-pooling vans. You pedal downtown and rack your bike, go in to work, your bike's rack fills up, your bike gets a ride back out of town in a van, you leave work, bike home, your rack fills up, your bike gets a van ride back downtown.
 
2013-11-06 11:47:51 AM

lilplatinum: Moopy Mac: There has not been a day caused by a cyclist in NYC since 2009. On the other hand, there were 274 motor vehicle related fatalities in 2012, distributed as 148 pedestrians, 18 cyclists, 35 motorcyclists, and 73 motor vehicle occupants.

Not surprising since there are more cars and many of them go on these things called highways which are more conducive to fatal accidents.  But I don't believe for a second none of those 18 cyclists involvde in fatal accidents which you just noticed were all following all the traffic rules and had nothing to do with the incidents.

Personal cars should be as welcome in Manhattan and Western Brooklyn as 7-11s.

Hey, I agree - a car in this city is quite silly.  But then again, so is riding a children's toy for transportation when you happen to live in a city with the best 24 hour public transportation system on the continent.


Bikes (particularly CITIBikes) Are often more convenient alone or used together with public transportation, than public transportation alone. Do you live in the City? It would be a lot easier to take a bike crosstown to the blue line (for example) than waiting for and taking a crosstown bus. Healthier as well.
 
2013-11-06 11:50:30 AM
Reginald Maudling:

Very little of your post makes sense. Highways are not more conducive to fatal accidents; 148 pedestrian deaths make up the large majority of motor vehicle related deaths, and I don't think many of these pedestrians were on the  highway.

Highways are more conducive to fatal accidents due to higher speeds, that likely caused a good deal of the non pedestrian deaths.  There are also a lot more cars than bikes in this city so the numbers will be skewed.  If safety is the primary argument than ride the farking subway, if you aren't a retard you are far less likely to be killed there than on your silly childrens toy.

But I have a more interesting question, Clearly, you think all 18 cyclist deaths were due to mishandling by the cyclists and you have nothing to back this up. OK, got it.

Clearly I think all deaths were due to mishandling?   I said "But I don't believe for a second none of those 18 cyclists involvde in fatal accidents which you just noticed were all following all the traffic rules and had nothing to do with the incidents." - where is that clearly stating that all of those were due to mishandling?

How many auto drivers--radio blaring, vision obstructed by the car itself--do you think follow all the traffic laws perfectly every day?

Very few follow traffic laws, but I see bikers running red lights, going down one way streets, and riding on sidewalks on a daily basis in both Brooklyn and Manhattan.  I have seen cars do these things (and worse), but it is not a daily basis.   

I'm also probably bitter because this is the second city in a row I have lived in with idiots on their childrens toys existing in large numbers, and the second city in a row I have been clipped or hit by a cyclist (first one drunk - at least in Germany they take away their license for that).
 
2013-11-06 11:51:19 AM
What happens if you ride your bike downtown to work and all the stalls are full? Do you have to wait for an open one?
 
2013-11-06 11:52:20 AM

Moopy Mac: Bikes (particularly CITIBikes) Are often more convenient alone or used together with public transportation, than public transportation alone.


Except in conjunction you have to take your bike on public transportation - which isn't allowed at some times I understand and is supremely douchey if its crowded.

Do you live in the City? It would be a lot easier to take a bike crosstown to the blue line (for example) than waiting for and taking a crosstown bus. Healthier as well.

I live 100 feet from the 2/3 in park slope (okay, strollers are even worse than bikes), wait 5 stops, and emerge right next to my office.  My commute could not be easier.
 
2013-11-06 11:56:14 AM

lilplatinum: I live 100 feet from the 2/3 in park slope (okay, strollers are even worse than bikes), wait 5 stops, and emerge right next to my office.  My commute could not be easier.


Move 100 feet.
 
2013-11-06 11:58:23 AM
I use it every day. No I don't wear a helmet, no I never ride on the sidewalk. You report on the console if there is a broken bike or put the seat backwards and they collect the bikes. The only problem is sometimes there's no free rack to park the bike so I have to go up 3 streets.

It's an amazing service.
 
2013-11-06 11:58:56 AM

Moopy Mac: lilplatinum: Moopy Mac: There has not been a day caused by a cyclist in NYC since 2009. On the other hand, there were 274 motor vehicle related fatalities in 2012, distributed as 148 pedestrians, 18 cyclists, 35 motorcyclists, and 73 motor vehicle occupants.

Not surprising since there are more cars and many of them go on these things called highways which are more conducive to fatal accidents.  But I don't believe for a second none of those 18 cyclists involvde in fatal accidents which you just noticed were all following all the traffic rules and had nothing to do with the incidents.

Personal cars should be as welcome in Manhattan and Western Brooklyn as 7-11s.

Hey, I agree - a car in this city is quite silly.  But then again, so is riding a children's toy for transportation when you happen to live in a city with the best 24 hour public transportation system on the continent.

Bikes (particularly CITIBikes) Are often more convenient alone or used together with public transportation, than public transportation alone. Do you live in the City? It would be a lot easier to take a bike crosstown to the blue line (for example) than waiting for and taking a crosstown bus. Healthier as well.


If you look at the map of stations (http://citibikenyc.com) all the stations are downtown below Central Park.

WTF?
 
2013-11-06 12:01:01 PM

WelldeadLink: lilplatinum: I live 100 feet from the 2/3 in park slope (okay, strollers are even worse than bikes), wait 5 stops, and emerge right next to my office.  My commute could not be easier.

Move 100 feet.


Touche
 
2013-11-06 12:03:48 PM
lilplatinum:

Highways are more conducive to fatal accidents due to higher speeds, that likely caused a good deal of the non pedestrian deaths.  There are also a lot more cars than bikes in this city so the numbers will be skewed.  If safety is the primary argument than ride the farking subway, if you aren't a retard you are far less likely to be killed there than on your silly childrens toy.

Clearly I think all deaths were due to mishandling?   I said "But I don't believe for a second none of those 18 cyclists involvde in fatal accidents which you just noticed were all following all the traffic rules and had nothing to do with the incidents." - where is that clearly stating that all of those were due to mishandling?

Very few follow traffic laws, but I see bikers running red lights, going down one way streets, and riding on sidewalks on a daily basis in both Brooklyn and Manhattan.  I have seen cars do these things (and worse), but it is not a daily basis.

I'm also probably bitter because this is the second city in a row I have lived in with idiots on their childrens toys existing in large numbers, and the second city in a row I have been clipped or hit by a cyclist (first one drunk - at least in Germany they take away their license for that).


Statistically highways are safer, that's always been the case. Less people die on highways. Also if you're trying to hurt people's feelings by calling it a children's toy, you can stop. And there's no reason to take the subway when I have free will and can do anything I want--hypothetically. You're basically telling me since drivers refuse to be responsible I should bend to that, instead of affecting change in drivers or attitudes about driving. Gimme a break.

Also, the first time you get "clipped" or hit by a car won't be as fun. Or it could also be your last. A cyclist who doesn't follow traffic laws endangers only himself. A car endangers literally everything around or near it.
 
2013-11-06 12:04:46 PM

duffblue: What happens if you ride your bike downtown to work and all the stalls are full? Do you have to wait for an open one?


You can do that or they have a real time app with the location of every bike station with how many bikes and open stalls there are. The app is free and shows your location. There is a station practically every two blocks in either direction.
 
2013-11-06 12:04:52 PM

poot_rootbeer: Moopy Mac: There has not been a day caused by a cyclist in NYC since 2009.

Well I guess as long as cyclist-involved incidents don't resolve in day [sic], we should just be happy about all the shiatheads ignoring traffic regulations and crashing into people in crosswalks.


Are you seriously suggesting that these are in any way related in NYC?  People are farking retarded crossing streets in NY.  One person looks, sees no cars immediately coming, starts crossing.  15 people follow without even glancing in either direction, against the light.  With a car, you can usually honk and people will look up, realize where they are and scurry out of the way.  On a bike, you have a little bell that everyone ignores.

I've stopped trying to get people's attention to get them to look at where they are going, and instead just do my best to weave through them.
 
2013-11-06 12:15:17 PM
I think this could work in Detroit.
 
2013-11-06 12:15:59 PM

lilplatinum:Hey, I agree - a car in this city is quite silly.  But then again, so is riding a children's toy for transportation when you happen to live in a city with the best 24 hour public transportation system on the continent.

Bikes for short runs are faster than the subway, and much much cheaper if you have an annual pass.  $90/year vs. $104/month.

WelldeadLink:  So the cyclists are actually burning gasoline in bike-pooling vans. You pedal downtown and rack your bike, go in to work, your bike's rack fills up, your bike gets a ride back out of town in a van, you leave work, bike home, your rack fills up, your bike gets a van ride back downtown.

From what I understand, near the major use areas (Port Authority Bus Terminal, Grand Central Station, etc) they have warehousing space with a few thousand bikes.  For the most part they load/unload the trucks from there.

lohphat: If you look at the map of stations (http://citibikenyc.com) all the stations are downtown below Central Park.

WTF?


South of Central Park is Midtown.  Everywhere south of that is pretty densely commercial, or hipstery.
 
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