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(Big Stock Photo)   You think English and British are the same? Hardly   (bigstockphoto.com) divider line 78
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4575 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Nov 2013 at 5:22 PM (23 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-05 04:29:16 PM
I pretty much agree with the British usage for almost all of those.
 
2013-11-05 04:48:09 PM
Ha!
 
2013-11-05 04:55:04 PM
The "British" definitions for 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 9, 11, and 17 are also used that way in the U.S.

/15, too, ever since Austin Powers
 
2013-11-05 05:06:46 PM
All have both meanings in the UK. But I've never heard anyone use 11 and call their grandparents nanny exactly. We have nannies. I'd be amazed at 9 if you guys don't cook with gas?
 
2013-11-05 05:17:20 PM
fanny
 
2013-11-05 05:25:58 PM
This article sucks.   Or, as they say in England, this article sucks.
 
2013-11-05 05:27:16 PM
We speak American.
 
2013-11-05 05:28:00 PM
^^ this ^^
 
2013-11-05 05:28:43 PM

busy chillin': We speak American.


dammit, you got between 2chris2 and myself!
 
2013-11-05 05:39:55 PM
The nanny one is just straight up wrong. In the UK nannies look after somebody else's children. Grandmothers are gran, granny, nana or nan. Never heard anybody call their grandmother 'nanny'.
 
2013-11-05 05:40:08 PM
So, in both places, "nanny" means "someone I'd totally do"?
 
2013-11-05 05:41:49 PM

bikerbob59: busy chillin': We speak American.

dammit, you got between 2chris2 and myself!


well, we do speak American.
 
2013-11-05 05:47:09 PM

Slaxl: All have both meanings in the UK. But I've never heard anyone use 11 and call their grandparents nanny exactly. We have nannies. I'd be amazed at 9 if you guys don't cook with gas?


Well plus gas in the US is probably more often used to mean petrol, and probably used less commonly in both versions to mean indigestion. The ones I can see that aren't common meanings of a word in the UK are Carnival to mean Fairground, Comforter, Randy (because that isn't a common name here, probably partly because of the other meaning), and Sacked (because most people don't really watch NFL, although at least a significant minority would understand that meaning in appropriate contexts).
 
2013-11-05 05:50:00 PM
They forgot to include "Beer" in that list.
 
2013-11-05 05:55:24 PM

Slaxl: All have both meanings in the UK. But I've never heard anyone use 11 and call their grandparents nanny exactly. We have nannies. I'd be amazed at 9 if you guys don't cook with gas?


I'm not sure about the northern states, but I know mostly in the South, we use either electric coils or electric glass tops to cook on a stove.
 
2013-11-05 05:55:38 PM
There are no words in Britain or America to adequately describe how awful this link is, how much subby sucks, and how bad the greening modmin is at his/her/its job.
 
2013-11-05 05:58:10 PM

2chris2: This article sucks.   Or, as they say in England, this article sucks.


I think you mean "I say, this article is of a most untruthful and scandalous nature. I shall no longer solicit this web-site, for it is not cracking."
 
2013-11-05 05:59:38 PM
Lame, lame, lame, lame

#18...HAHAHAHA

lame, lame.
 
2013-11-05 06:01:29 PM

Contrabulous Flabtraption: There are no words in Britain or America to adequately describe how awful this link is, how much subby sucks, and how bad the greening modmin is at his/her/its job.


Still better than Buzzfeed.
 
2013-11-05 06:03:54 PM

Handsome B. Wonderful: Contrabulous Flabtraption: There are no words in Britain or America to adequately describe how awful this link is, how much subby sucks, and how bad the greening modmin is at his/her/its job.

Still better than Buzzfeed.


true. f*ck that site
 
2013-11-05 06:05:01 PM
that "article" was bad and you should feel bad
 
2013-11-05 06:08:14 PM
One day all web sites will be BuzzFeed.

/apparently
 
2013-11-05 06:10:42 PM
 
2013-11-05 06:13:17 PM
i.huffpost.com
 
2013-11-05 06:15:49 PM

fusillade762: I'll just leave this here.

The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England


You keep your learning out of here!
 
2013-11-05 06:17:52 PM
Is Fanny Pack in there?  I was told long ago by my Brit coworker that it has an entirely different meaning there.  She wouldn't demonstrate though.
 
2013-11-05 06:18:33 PM

MinkeyMan: The nanny one is just straight up wrong. In the UK nannies look after somebody else's children. Grandmothers are gran, granny, nana or nan. Never heard anybody call their grandmother 'nanny'.


I did, my mother's mother was "Nanny _____", and was called that by both us kids, all our cousins and our parents. She was an actual Nanny for someone else's kids for a couple of decades though I think, so that might be a special case rather than being normal (obviously it seems normal to me, but I have no idea how common it is).
 
2013-11-05 06:20:38 PM
Meh, most of those are already old news to anyone that watches any British shows.
 
2013-11-05 06:23:59 PM
There are so many obvious ones, that list was shiate.

bonnet = hood,  caravan = camper,lorrie = truck,bollocks = balls,quid = dollar,bangers = sausage

/just off the top of my head
//probably dozens more if i tried
 
2013-11-05 06:24:18 PM
Nanny means the same thing in both the UK & the US.

Think Mary Poppins
 
2013-11-05 06:27:51 PM
FERN

US

static.ddmcdn.com

BRITISH

www.eventprophire.com

/Ferns...they make a cunny noise like
 
2013-11-05 06:33:15 PM
Ah shoot I forgot to link to the QI regarding the fern posting...

Here is Stephen Fry being demolished by a Newcastle accent

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqRkkVQ6OSE
 
2013-11-05 06:56:39 PM
Wow, so I guess words can only have one meaning?

Some of those were just stupid, I might add.
 
2013-11-05 07:01:46 PM
Not at all, Spotted Dick. Plus the brits has shiatty teeth.

/banger & mash. It's cheap to banger.
 
2013-11-05 07:05:49 PM
#21 - Pants.

America:

cj.sunne.ws

England:

www.runnersworld.com
 
2013-11-05 07:24:22 PM

timujin: The "British" definitions for 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 9, 11, and 17 are also used that way in the U.S.

/15, too, ever since Austin Powers


18 and 20 as well, and 12 and 14 are debatable as well.
 
2013-11-05 07:29:15 PM

Slaxl: All have both meanings in the UK. But I've never heard anyone use 11 and call their grandparents nanny exactly. We have nannies. I'd be amazed at 9 if you guys don't cook with gas?


That stuff what come from the food burner is what we calls fire air.
 
2013-11-05 07:29:41 PM
American English steals words and phrases from other languages ... if they sound cool.

It's what makes it both awesome, and so damned confusing to folks from other languages.
 
2013-11-05 07:32:55 PM

Stig O'Tracy: There are so many obvious ones, that list was shiate.

bonnet = hood,  caravan = camper,lorrie = truck,bollocks = balls,quid = dollar,bangers = sausage

/just off the top of my head
//probably dozens more if i tried


quid is slang for pound (meaning the currency), so would be closer to buck (although really they mean different things as they are different currencies). Sausage=sausage, it is just bangers is a slang term for it. Lorry is not spelt "lorrie", and truck would understood and used sometimes, although the implication might more often be other types of heavy vehicle (like an open bed vehicle). The drivers might also be called truckers rather than lorry drivers in the UK as well in many cases.

Bonnet would be a type of womans hat, so that one works. And a camper is someone who goes camping, usually implying taking a tent rather than with a vehicle designed for the purpose.
 
2013-11-05 07:33:43 PM

fusillade762: #21 - Pants.

America:

[cj.sunne.ws image 400x500]

England:

[www.runnersworld.com image 400x300]


#22 - Hats
US


United States
images.encyclopediadramatica.es

UK
cdn01.cdnwp.celebuzz.com
 
2013-11-05 07:42:07 PM

Flying Code Monkey: One day all web sites will be BuzzFeed.

/apparently


The site we are now on is aiming for "BuzzFark".
 
2013-11-05 08:00:25 PM

fusillade762: [i.huffpost.com image 570x427]


Um, I'm pretty sure that has the same meaning both places.
 
2013-11-05 08:10:24 PM
Article stretched really hard for most of these. Almost all of them are just alternate definitions that see more use in their respective countries, while still existing in both.

Also, I love the guy that managed to shave off part of his face while pushing the razor backwards.
 
2013-11-05 08:27:35 PM
boozel : Article stretched really hard for most of these

A better question is ... why is a stock photography web site creating "articles" like this?
 
2013-11-05 08:34:22 PM

Slaxl: All have both meanings in the UK. But I've never heard anyone use 11 and call their grandparents nanny exactly. We have nannies. I'd be amazed at 9 if you guys don't cook with gas?


I would have changed the US version to mean gasoline, or petrol.
 
2013-11-05 08:41:33 PM
I sure hope "getting some pussy" means the same or I am going to be charged with bestiality.
 
2013-11-05 08:54:02 PM
Is BIGSTOCK another BUZZFEED? O please kill me
 
2013-11-05 09:29:38 PM
Horrible link. Baby Jesus cries.
 
2013-11-05 09:38:24 PM
List fails for not including a football/soccer reference.
 
2013-11-05 09:43:47 PM
Failed starting with #1. Several others go either way, too---Tart, Waffle, Sacked, Canned.

 I work with a guy from England and when someone has a day off (as in ONE day) He says they're 'on vacation' to which I reply "No they aren't. They're taking THE DAY OFF." Yeah, they're using a vacation day, ok, I get it, but they aren't on f*cking vacation!
 
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