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(BGR)   Blackberry buyout deal fails as investors look for $1 billion in new funding....better make that $2 billion...er, $3 billion...uh, guys?   (bgr.com) divider line 24
    More: Obvious, CEO  
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770 clicks; posted to Business » on 04 Nov 2013 at 11:43 AM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



24 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-11-04 11:44:57 AM
You ran the company into the ground!  Take your multi-million dollar severance package and get out!  Let that be a lesson to you!
 
2013-11-04 11:51:42 AM
Blackberry can't even fail correctly. Of course.
 
2013-11-04 11:53:50 AM
Eh, even as the CEO you can't do too much damage in about a year, which is how long Thirsty Hens (or whatever) was in charge.

I wouldn't disagree with any argument that he sealed their fate, though. Blackberry was finished the minute they decided to view the iPhone as a toy, not competition.
 
2013-11-04 12:01:15 PM

xsarien: I wouldn't disagree with any argument that he sealed their fate, though. Blackberry was finished the minute they decided to view the iPhone as a toy, not competition.


No that wasn't their mistake.  They knew the iPhone was great and people loved it.

Their MAIN mistake was their belief that enterprises would never expose active synch to the internet allowing those iOS and Android devices to get corporate emails and other resources without BB's NOC and its "security".

The bet against the consumerization of IT.  Since that had never happened before, it was not that stupid a theory.  But it turned out to be very very wrong.
 
2013-11-04 12:26:41 PM

AngryDragon: You ran the company into the ground!  Take your multi-million dollar severance package and get out!  Let that be a lesson to you!


No, he didn't.  He was CEO for a year.  The damage was done long before he took over.
 
2013-11-04 12:27:19 PM
 
2013-11-04 12:43:02 PM

The Dynamite Monkey: Their MAIN mistake was their belief that enterprises would never expose active synch to the internet allowing those iOS and Android devices to get corporate emails and other resources without BB's NOC and its "security".

The bet against the consumerization of IT.  Since that had never happened before, it was not that stupid a theory.  But it turned out to be very very wrong.


The Storm didn't help matters much, though. Verizon needed a Blackberry killer badly to compete against iOS. The Storm was what Verizon pushed in the fall of 2008, and when it failed miserably they went to Plan B in 2009, which was the Droid. That helped put Android on the map, so when the Galaxy S was launched in the summer of 2010 all the stars were aligned for it to be a hit. If the Storm hadn't had been such a piece of crap, maybe things would have worked out differently.
 
2013-11-04 12:55:37 PM

The Dynamite Monkey: Their MAIN mistake was their belief that enterprises would never expose active synch to the internet allowing those iOS and Android devices to get corporate emails and other resources without BB's NOC and its "security".


Two issues with your statement.  The first is that tools appeared on the scene to manage iOS devices just like Blackberries achieving the security requirements of most companies.  The second is what really sealed its fate was Apples release of iMessages which made irrelevant RIMs last advantage which was its messaging platform.
 
2013-11-04 01:02:22 PM

The Dynamite Monkey: Their MAIN mistake was their belief that enterprises would never expose active synch


I think you are close, but incomplete. The functionality that IT was looking for wasn't ActiveSync (RPC over HTTPS was working before that), it was Autodiscover.  Exchange 2007 and Autodiscover completely changed the landscape.  The licensing of Activesync to outside parties, particularly Apple, was also critical.
 
2013-11-04 01:57:21 PM
I think there are too many deck chairs on the port side and not enough in the aft.   Everyone grab some and lets get this rearrangement underway!
 
2013-11-04 02:26:48 PM
IMHO BB Failed for the following reasons:
1.) NOC Outages. Nothing highlighted BB problems like a two day outage. Our CEO went ballistic when he couldn't get his email. Wasn't long after we started looking at iPhone

2.) Insane licensing policy. Expensive and convoluted to upgrade.

3.) App development. Tried to download SDK from BB. They made it nearly imposibile to get an use. IOS was infinitely easier to get and use.
 
2013-11-04 02:32:55 PM

xsarien: Eh, even as the CEO you can't do too much damage in about a year, which is how long Thirsty Hens (or whatever) was in charge.


Leo Apotheker would disagree.
 
2013-11-04 03:41:10 PM

gingerjet: The first is that tools appeared on the scene to manage iOS devices just like Blackberries achieving the security requirements of most companies.


I assume you are talking about MDM providers. None of which had BB's type security "architecture" with one exception - Good.  All the rest use the old fashioned Internets alone. Some behind VPNs but Internets nonetheless.

gingerjet: the second is what really sealed its fate was Apples release of iMessages which made irrelevant RIMs last advantage which was its messaging platform.

I respectfully disagree with this 100%.  Enterprises decided the savings brought by BYOD and iPhones and Androids outweighed the security risks from not using an architecture based on premise-to-NOC secure data flow.  The only companies who are making these decisions based on messaging are US based financial services firms who have laws to archive every message regardless of carrier or device, and BB is still the only way to do this 100%.

Shryke: I think you are close, but incomplete.


Yes but you got the gist -- BB never believed enterprises would abandon their security models for "consumer" devices.

CloseYourMouth: 1.) NOC Outages. Nothing highlighted BB problems like a two day outage. Our CEO went ballistic when he couldn't get his email. Wasn't long after we started looking at iPhone


You betcha.  Kinda hard to tout your value after that.

CloseYourMouth: 2.) Insane licensing policy. Expensive and convoluted to upgrade.


Yes x1k, and once the bean counters compared that column to "let's let the employee pay for his own computer!" it wasn't much of a contest.
 
2013-11-04 04:54:02 PM
A golfing buddy of mine was laughing about his gains as he had bought BBBY a little before the release of 10, or whatever it was. I told him he was nuts and that now was the time to buy AAPL as it was finally finding a bottom. We had a bit of a disagreement over it for a couple of holes and then dropped it. I wonder if he's still holding? I'll be sure and laugh loudest next time I see him.
 
2013-11-04 05:25:24 PM
I still think RIM should have bought Palm and WebOS.
 
2013-11-04 08:24:24 PM

CloseYourMouth: 2.) Insane licensing policy. Expensive and convoluted to upgrade.


I agree with your other two, but I've been running a BES since it came out (some people adamantly refuse to give up their BB's) and the licensing, while expensive, was pretty straightforward.  CALs carry over to anything, and as long as we paid support for the year we got server upgrades for free.  I've never had an issue with licensing from them.

The BB10 Fusion server (or whatever they call it now) is where it WAS convoluted because they said the old BES licenses wouldn't carry over, but they backtracked on that after a few months.  Otherwise it's been pretty straightforward.
 
2013-11-04 08:30:49 PM
Has there ever been a tech company that failed so spectacularly?
 
2013-11-04 09:22:45 PM

MFAWG: Has there ever been a tech company that failed so spectacularly?


atomictoasters.com
 
2013-11-04 10:10:10 PM

AngryDragon: You ran the company into the ground!  Take your multi-million dollar severance package and get out!  Let that be a lesson to you!


To be fair, the company was already run into the ground when this guy took over.

That company is full Clown Shoes from top to bottom.
 
2013-11-04 10:28:58 PM

MFAWG: Has there ever been a tech company that failed so spectacularly?


Palm.  They owned the market before Blackberry and managed to miss the whole wireless revolution altogether.  Palm should have been the first smartphone manufacturer, but they completely missed the boat on that.

Before that (or after, depending on how you look at it) Sun Microsystems.
 
2013-11-05 09:24:52 AM

Lsherm: MFAWG: Has there ever been a tech company that failed so spectacularly?

Palm.  They owned the market before Blackberry and managed to miss the whole wireless revolution altogether.  Palm should have been the first smartphone manufacturer, but they completely missed the boat on that.

Before that (or after, depending on how you look at it) Sun Microsystems.


Wang. (Yeah, I'm old.)
 
2013-11-05 09:44:21 AM

The Dynamite Monkey: xsarien: I wouldn't disagree with any argument that he sealed their fate, though. Blackberry was finished the minute they decided to view the iPhone as a toy, not competition.

No that wasn't their mistake.  They knew the iPhone was great and people loved it.

Their MAIN mistake was their belief that enterprises would never expose active synch to the internet allowing those iOS and Android devices to get corporate emails and other resources without BB's NOC and its "security".

The bet against the consumerization of IT.  Since that had never happened before, it was not that stupid a theory.  But it turned out to be very very wrong.


The problem is that each OEM's implementation of ActiveSync is buggy. BES is still the only reliable end-to-end solution which just works.
 
2013-11-05 11:22:05 AM

lohphat: The problem is that each OEM's implementation of ActiveSync is buggy. BES is still the only reliable end-to-end solution which just works.


Well, we could debate that, but honestly, the market has made their decision.
 
2013-11-05 01:49:41 PM

The Dynamite Monkey: lohphat: The problem is that each OEM's implementation of ActiveSync is buggy. BES is still the only reliable end-to-end solution which just works.

Well, we could debate that, but honestly, the market has made their decision.


No argument there. Their AppStore always sucked and they sat on their ass too long. However if all you want is a phone + PIM and not want a game or media platform. It still is a functional appliance.
 
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