If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(YouTube)   Sure, kittens and puppy videos are cute, and even some of the more exotic baby animal videos (like giraffes and such) have their fans. But nothing tops the cuteness scale like a baby pygmy hippo. Nothing   (youtube.com) divider line 22
    More: Sappy, hippo, pygmy hippopotamus  
•       •       •

4103 clicks; posted to Video » on 04 Nov 2013 at 12:12 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-11-04 11:07:01 AM  
Yes yes yes very cute. But it's fascinating to me that more females are born when a species is in captivity or endangered. Do any zoologists out there care to explain this phenom?

I also recall reading that during times of war, more human babies are female too, I wonder if these reasons are linked?
 
2013-11-04 11:56:48 AM  

i253.photobucket.com

Pecos Filbert and Popcorn ride a dusty trail that lies somewhere between Cutesville and BRUTAL TEXAS JUSTICE!
 
2013-11-04 12:02:59 PM  
Sure, they're cute, but they're not furry and furry wins.

/actually look kind of like someone shaved a calf and then covered it in axle grease
//nttawwt
 
2013-11-04 12:27:23 PM  
Not as cute as the North American House Hippo.
 
2013-11-04 12:31:40 PM  
Reminds me of a family that comes to the pool near us in the summer.
 
2013-11-04 12:43:30 PM  
I'd rather juggle a chainsaw with a rattlesnake handle than get that close to a baby hippo with its mother right next to it.  Hippos are incredibly dangerous.
 
2013-11-04 12:55:55 PM  
Eh. Looks like a misshapen proto-beast.

/when he grows up, he'll be *very* bad tempered
 
2013-11-04 01:04:45 PM  

Ivo Shandor: Not as cute as the North American House Hippo.


*shakes tiny tiny linty fist at you*
 
2013-11-04 01:12:49 PM  
Baby elephants are WAY cuter.
 
2013-11-04 01:18:36 PM  

Mrs.Sharpier: Yes yes yes very cute. But it's fascinating to me that more females are born when a species is in captivity or endangered. Do any zoologists out there care to explain this phenom?

I also recall reading that during times of war, more human babies are female too, I wonder if these reasons are linked?


Not a zoologist, but I'd say it's something to do with the fact that 1 male can impregnate multiple females simultaneously, making restocking of the gene pool more efficient.
 
2013-11-04 01:27:43 PM  

syrynxx: I'd rather juggle a chainsaw with a rattlesnake handle than get that close to a baby hippo with its mother right next to it.  Hippos are incredibly dangerous.


I was thinking this.  Also, I'm totally stealing "juggle a chainsaw with a rattlesnake handle" from you.
 
2013-11-04 01:29:57 PM  
Reminds me of piglets...mmmm hippo bacon and hippo ribs...MMMMMM!!!!
 
2013-11-04 01:51:40 PM  

Mrs.Sharpier: Yes yes yes very cute. But it's fascinating to me that more females are born when a species is in captivity or endangered. Do any zoologists out there care to explain this phenom?

I also recall reading that during times of war, more human babies are female too, I wonder if these reasons are linked?


There was one incredibly poor study done showing sex-ratio skewing in captive populations, but the data were REALLY poor and shouldn't be taken without a whole bag of salt. In terms of why more female babies may (or may not) be born in captivity, it's incredibly important to consider that in mammals, you should look at the sex both at conception and at birth. It's much more likely that if there is a trend of female bias in captivity, it's occurring through non-random miscarriage (animals not getting the right nutrition could lead to one sex of embryo paying a larger price than another) rather than some underlying genetic reason. In mammals, dad gives an X or a Y and we're talking about millions of sperm per event at pretty darn close to a 50:50 ratio (barring any genetic abnormality, meiotic drive, etc.).

I'd like to see the data that in captivity hippos are at a 5:1 female:male sex ratio. That seems too incredible to be real given the way that sex is determined in mammals. Zookeepers, while they're great at their job, are not statisticians and can stretch anecdotal evidence much farther than a reproductive biologist may.

/Reproductive biologist
//Don't work on mammals, they're boring,
///Turtles ftw.
 
2013-11-04 02:30:53 PM  

jazz710: Mrs.Sharpier: Yes yes yes very cute. But it's fascinating to me that more females are born when a species is in captivity or endangered. Do any zoologists out there care to explain this phenom?

I also recall reading that during times of war, more human babies are female too, I wonder if these reasons are linked?

There was one incredibly poor study done showing sex-ratio skewing in captive populations, but the data were REALLY poor and shouldn't be taken without a whole bag of salt. In terms of why more female babies may (or may not) be born in captivity, it's incredibly important to consider that in mammals, you should look at the sex both at conception and at birth. It's much more likely that if there is a trend of female bias in captivity, it's occurring through non-random miscarriage (animals not getting the right nutrition could lead to one sex of embryo paying a larger price than another) rather than some underlying genetic reason. In mammals, dad gives an X or a Y and we're talking about millions of sperm per event at pretty darn close to a 50:50 ratio (barring any genetic abnormality, meiotic drive, etc.).

I'd like to see the data that in captivity hippos are at a 5:1 female:male sex ratio. That seems too incredible to be real given the way that sex is determined in mammals. Zookeepers, while they're great at their job, are not statisticians and can stretch anecdotal evidence much farther than a reproductive biologist may.

/Reproductive biologist
//Don't work on mammals, they're boring,
///Turtles ftw.


You like turtles?

www.maniacworld.com
 
2013-11-04 03:24:27 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-11-04 03:48:24 PM  
Yes. Yes he is very cute. May he grow up to be a strong, healthy adult hippo and produce many more cute baby pygmy hippos.

Carry on the lineage, little dude!
 
2013-11-04 03:52:20 PM  

Glitchwerks: [i.imgur.com image 686x480]

i.dailymail.co.uk
c1planetsavecom.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com
images.teamsugar.com

www.thatcutesite.com
www.stockvault.net
 
2013-11-04 08:08:22 PM  

Glitchwerks: [i.imgur.com image 686x480]


The otter community frowns on your shenanigans?
 
2013-11-04 09:10:56 PM  
From the Jungle Cruise Captain:

"Hippos are only dangerous when they're blowing bubbles and wiggling their ears."
 
2013-11-04 09:53:23 PM  
Something that cute was just what my heart needed right now.  Thank you!
 
2013-11-04 11:05:51 PM  
I had no idea there was even such a thing as a pygmy hippo. It astounds me that such an animal could ever evolve, considering that normal hippos rely mostly on their size to keep predators at bay.
 
2013-11-05 08:26:35 AM  
Looks like the Match dot com and OK Cupid selections in Northern Vermont.
 
Displayed 22 of 22 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report