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(Space.com)   America's fourth astronaut honored at Colorado funeral. Missing Man formation stirs up huge cloud of dust   (space.com) divider line 25
    More: Followup, Colorado, missing man, Gene Cernan, astronauts, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, clouds, dust, Rusty Schweickart  
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2238 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Nov 2013 at 7:07 PM (24 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-03 04:02:29 PM
America's second astronaut delivered the eulogy, subby.
 
2013-11-03 07:15:57 PM

bearded clamorer: America's second astronaut delivered the eulogy, subby.


You're both wrong. Glenn was the third US astronaut, and first to orbit. Carpenter was the fourth and second to orbit. Shepard and Grissom were the first two.
 
2013-11-03 07:16:23 PM
No, America's THIRD astronaut delivered the eulogy if it was John Glenn. As was said in the other thread, Shepard was first, Grissom was second. Carpenter was fourth, and almost screwed up bad enough to shut down the space program altogether. I'm sure he was a fine man, and a hero, but the lack of understanding of space history is truly astounding. People could at least consult Wikipedia.
 
2013-11-03 07:24:10 PM

docfinance: the lack of understanding of space history is truly astounding.


I was at the Air & Space Museum this spring.  Wifey and I had been a couple times before, but this time we took their free volunteer-led tour.  The tour guide, who was about 150, had an amazing level of knowledge about the space programs.  He rattled off dates and names and all kinds of details; it was a fantastic couple of hours.
 
2013-11-03 07:26:55 PM
Some years ago, I was in the front cabin of an American Airlines flight from JFK to SFO. I could vaguely overhear the conversation between the passengers in the row behind me. One was a fairly young 'suit' who was full of his own importance, and the other was an elderly, military-looking gentleman.
Throughout the flight, the suit droned on about his own company, which developed software for 'real-time'  operating systems (which were a big thing at the time)
As we were on finals, he asked the elderly chap what he did for a living.
"I'm an Astronaut", he said. I listened very carefully, but all I could hear was that he was part of the Mercury program. I have no idea who he was.
It's got to be the best put-down of all time.
True story, bro.
 
2013-11-03 07:29:53 PM
Not that it matters, but I saw him speak once. He talked more about the seas than he did about space.
 
2013-11-03 07:39:41 PM

SomeoneDumb: Not that it matters, but I saw him speak once. He talked more about the seas than he did about space.


Apparently he only went to space once, but that is far more than most people ever will.
 
2013-11-03 07:39:56 PM
 
2013-11-03 09:21:02 PM
Sir, over there.  Is that a man?
 
2013-11-03 09:25:59 PM

jaytkay: Commander Scott Carpenter Speaks to President Johnson from the helium atmosphere of the Navy's SEALAB in 1964


cdn.static.ovimg.com
/Hello, Sea Monkeys!
 
2013-11-03 09:32:59 PM
Rest well Mr Carpenter... you helped lead this species toward a new age of exploration and science

/ wants to see NASA funding increase
// wants to see science and tech advance
/// wants more slashies
 
2013-11-03 09:33:12 PM
We've had three of these threads at least, and three subby's that are idiots. You don't have to be in orbit to be in space, otherwise people wouldn't be lining up to pop up 60 plus miles via the VSS Enterprise. Alan Shepard was the first with a suborbital flight, then Virgil Grissom was the second with another suborbital flight, and then finally John Glenn and Scott Carpenter. This is important to know, simply because during the early 1960's Russia simply had better rockets than us. Hell, they still have some of the best rockets/rocket engines in the world.

 1: Yuri Gagarin 
 2: Alan Shepard
 3: Virgil Grissom
 4: Gherman Titov
 5: John Glenn
 6: Scott Carpenter
 7: Andrian Nikolaev
 8: Pavel Popovich
 9: Walter Schirra
10: Gordon Coope
r
 
2013-11-03 09:38:39 PM

RickN99: docfinance: the lack of understanding of space history is truly astounding.

I was at the Air & Space Museum this spring.  Wifey and I had been a couple times before, but this time we took their free volunteer-led tour.  The tour guide, who was about 150, had an amazing level of knowledge about the space programs.  He rattled off dates and names and all kinds of details; it was a fantastic couple of hours.


I got a personal tour from the guy who runs the Udvar Hazy museum in Chantilly.  That was all kinds of awesome.  He pulled this trick where we got on the elevator for the control tower on the second floor, so we skipped the line without looking like dicks.  Got to walk past the cordons on a bunch of exhibits and touch stuff, like the Space Shuttle.  Cool guy.  USNA classmate of my dad.  Killing me that I don't remember his name.

/csb
 
2013-11-03 09:47:19 PM
In all these threads I remember Gus Grissom, Ed White, and Roger Chaffee. Rest in Peace.
 
2013-11-03 09:53:52 PM

Neo Geek: Rest well Mr Carpenter... you helped lead this species toward a new age of exploration and science

/ wants to see NASA funding increase
// wants to see science and tech advance
/// wants more slashies


Agreed, unfortunately American's have given up on science. Quantum physics is perhaps the biggest glaring example of how science has changed our lives after vaccinations/antibiotics. My computer, your computer, our smart phones, weather satellites, they were all made possible due to an understanding of quantum physics. Yet who leads the world when it comes to physics these days? Europe. Its the same for astronomy.

Of course what do you expect? Half the country at least think the United States is broke, and thinks pushing the limits in science or space would be too expensive. Keep in mind, we spent trillions on two wars that have not benefited us or our economy, and bailed out the banks/etc. Now, think if all that money has spent on science and space travel instead. Nope, would be a waste of money! Clearly.

Then there are the idiots who think its perfectly fine if we let someone else do it, or that we should stop until times are good again. Science doesn't work that way. If you don't invest in science, your scientists will go elsewhere in the world. Europe, China, and then the next crop of scientists will not have the best minds in the world to learn from. No, they'll have to go elsewhere in the world to do that. Brain drain is a very real risk, because once you've stopped investing in science it takes generations to build up that capability again.

As American, I have to say that investing in science should be one of our top priorities if not our biggest top priority. Otherwise we will not maintain our capability to stay competitive, and like Rome before us we will cease being relevant. Its that simple.
 
2013-11-03 10:17:24 PM
all I could think of when I saw this was "didn't he die like a month ago?"
 
2013-11-03 10:30:52 PM
It's really crazy to think about how quickly we've come in technology advancement. In less than half a humans expected life time we went from "Holy fark! We orbited earth!" to landing rovers on Mars with a farking sky crane..
 
2013-11-03 10:42:46 PM

bbfreak: We've had three of these threads at least, and three subby's that are idiots. You don't have to be in orbit to be in space, otherwise people wouldn't be lining up to pop up 60 plus miles via the VSS Enterprise. Alan Shepard was the first with a suborbital flight, then Virgil Grissom was the second with another suborbital flight, and then finally John Glenn and Scott Carpenter. This is important to know, simply because during the early 1960's Russia simply had better rockets than us. Hell, they still have some of the best rockets/rocket engines in the world.

 1: Yuri Gagarin*
 2: Alan Shepard
 3: Virgil Grissom
 4: Gherman Titov
 5: John Glenn
 6: Scott Carpenter
 7: Andrian Nikolaev
 8: Pavel Popovich
 9: Walter Schirra
10: Gordon Cooper

*The Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) is the world's air sports federation. It was founded in 1905 as a non-governmental and non-profit making international organization to further aeronautical and astronautical activities worldwide. Among its duties, the FAI certifies and registers records. Its first records in aviation date back to 1906. The organization also arbitrates disputes over records. If nationals from two different countries claim a record, it is the FAI's job to examine the submitted documentation and make a ruling as to who has accomplished the feat first. When it was apparent that the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics were planning to launch men into space, the FAI specified spaceflight guidelines. One of the stipulations that the FAI carried over from aviation was that spacecraft pilots, like aircraft pilots should land inside their craft in order for the record to be valid. In the case of aviation, this made perfect sense. No one wanted to encourage pilots to sacrifice themselves for an aviation record. Piloting an aircraft that could not land did nothing to further aeronautical engineering.

When Yuri Gagarin orbited the Earth on 12 April 1961, the plan had never been for him to land inside his Vostok spacecraft. His spherical reentry capsule came through the Earth's atmosphere on a ballistic trajectory. Soviet engineers had not yet perfected a braking system that would slow the craft sufficiently for a human to survive impact. They decided to eject the cosmonaut from his craft. Yuri Gagarin ejected at 20,000 feet and landed safely on Earth. Soviet engineers had not discussed this shortcoming with Soviet delegates to the FAI prior to his flight. They prepared their documents for the FAI omitting this fact. This led everyone to believe that Gagarin had landed inside his spacecraft. It was not until four months later, when German Titov became the second human to orbit the Earth and the first person to spend a full day in space, when the controversy began to brew. Titov owned up to ejecting himself. This led to a special meeting of the delegates to the FAI to reexamine Titov's spaceflight records. The conclusion of the delegates was to rework the parameters of human spaceflight to recognize that the great technological accomplishment of spaceflight was the launch, orbiting and safe return of the human, not the manner in which he or she landed. Gagarin and Titov's records remained on the FAI books. Even after Soviet -made models of the Vostok spacecraft made it clear that the craft had no braking capability, the FAI created the Gagarin Medal that it awards annually to greatest aviation or space achievement of that year.
 
2013-11-03 11:13:49 PM

jaytkay: Commander Scott Carpenter Speaks to President Johnson from the helium atmosphere of the Navy's SEALAB in 1964


Where the operator insisted that unless Carpenter could talk clear and helium-free he could not talk to the president.
 
2013-11-03 11:29:13 PM
We're losing them....we're losing them...!!
 
2013-11-04 12:13:06 AM
And then there was one...

/do not go gently into that good night Astronaut/Colonel/Senator Glenn
 
2013-11-04 01:37:42 AM
hasty ambush:
When Yuri Gagarin orbited the Earth on 12 April 1961, the plan had never been for him to land inside his Vostok spacecraft. His spherical reentry capsule came through the Earth's atmosphere on a ballistic trajectory. Soviet engineers had not yet perfected a braking system that would slow the craft sufficiently for a human to survive impact. They decided to eject the cosmonaut from his craft. Yuri Gagarin ejected at 20,000 feet and landed safely on Earth. Soviet engineers had not discussed this shortcoming with Soviet delegates to the FAI prior to his flight. They prepared their documents for the FAI omitting this fact. This led everyone to believe that Gagarin had landed inside his spacecraft. It was not until four months later, when German Titov became the second human to orbit the Earth and the first person to spend a full day in space, when the controversy began to brew. Titov owned up to ejecting himself. This led to a special meeting of the delegates to the FAI to reexamine Titov's spaceflight records. The conclusion of the delegates was to rework the parameters of human spaceflight to recognize that the great technological accomplishment of spaceflight was the launch, orbiting and safe return of the human, not the manner in which he or she landed. Gagarin and Titov's records remained on the FAI books. Even after Soviet -made models of the Vostok spacecraft made it clear that the craft had no braking capability, the FAI created the Gagarin Medal that it awards annually to greatest aviation or space achievement of that year.

That's Frog Bias for ya. Just cannot allow a Yankee to become the first to make the FULL trip from launch to landing.
 
2013-11-04 02:34:03 AM

SomeoneDumb: Not that it matters, but I saw him speak once. He talked more about the seas than he did about space.


There's a uniquely good view of the seas from space. I'm sure it leaves quite an impression.
 
2013-11-04 02:50:19 AM
A prominent Space figure being eulogized in Colorado, and no Aurora jokes? 

Fark, I am so proud... You're all grown up now!
 
2013-11-04 07:09:22 AM

clintster: And then there was one...

/do not go gently into that good night Astronaut/Colonel/Senator/criminal Glenn



FTFY Politics ruins many a formally honest man.

Glenn was  one of the "Keating Five" for accepting a $200,000 contribution from convicted savings and loan executive Charles H. Keating Jr.

Tied to the Savings and Loan crisis on the 1980's. Five U.S. senators were named in the scandal: Sen. Alan Cranston (D.-Calif.), Sen. Dennis DeConcini (D.-Ariz.), Sen. John Glenn (D.-Ohio), Sen. John McCain (R.-Ariz.) and Sen. Donald Reigle (D-Minn.).
At Keating's behest, four senators--McCain and Democrats Dennis DeConcini of Arizona, Alan Cranston of California, and John Glenn of Ohio--met with Ed Gray, chairman of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, on April 2. Those four senators and Sen. Don Riegle, D-Mich., attended a second meeting at Keating's behest on April 9 with bank regulators in San Francisco to discuss an investigation into Lincoln Savings and Loan, an Irvine, Calif., thrift owned by Arizona developer Charles Keating
Regulators did not seize Lincoln Savings and Loan until two years later. The Lincoln bailout cost taxpayers $2.6 billion, making it the biggest of the S&L scandals. In addition, 17,000 Lincoln investors lost $190 million.

A 1991 Senate commission declared that the Senators only crime was "poor judgment."  Keating himself was convicted in January 1993 of 73 counts of wire and bankruptcy fraud and served more than four years in prison before his conviction was overturned. Later, he pleaded guilty to four counts of fraud and was sentenced to time served
 
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