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(Some Guy)   This just may be the best 32,000-pixel-wide zoomable image of the Andromeda Galaxy you'll see today   (anela.mtk.nao.ac.jp) divider line 68
    More: Cool  
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5408 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Nov 2013 at 9:00 AM (41 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-03 08:37:17 PM
I was having fun looking for images I think are galaxies in the background.  They are all OVER the place.  Imagine the fun you could have with a telescope that could resolve this level of detail.  I think we should post screenshots of the coolest things we find.
 
2013-11-03 08:56:44 PM
So here are some things I spotted.  I divide them up in possible galaxies and unknown weird things.

(possible) Galaxy

x=27957, y=15527
a00:40:14 g=+41:10:04

X=27309, Y=15272
a00:40:24 g=+41:09:21

x=21458, y=20821
a00:41:51 g=+41:24:58

x=24759, y=19165
a00:41:02 g=+41:20:18

Unknown Weird Object

x=23684 y=17900
a:00:41:18 g=+41:16:46

x=26338 y=18046
a00:40:38, g=+41:17:10

x=23606, y=18982
a00:41:19 g=+41:19:48
 
2013-11-03 09:18:25 PM

BetterMetalSnake: eyeq360: machoprogrammer: dbirchall: give me doughnuts: The light is from a long time ago, [from stars] in a galaxy far, far away.

Isn't Andromeda one of the closer ones, and HEADING RIGHT FOR US?

Yeah, we only have about 3 billion years until the collision, too. Better get some insurance!!!

Do you suggest AFLAC or GEICO?  Or will the Great Old Ones consume us first?  I'd hate to get gypped paying for comprehensive galaxy collision insurance when all I need is Great Old One liability insurance because I might have accidentally summoned Cthuhu by mistake.

You can probably get a good rate if you bundle it with your robot insurance. You DO have robot insurance, dont you?


I got that with the Humongous Mecha Destruction Insurance Package.  I was going to bundle that with the Asian Monster Invasion package, but that cost too much.
 
2013-11-03 09:32:27 PM

jonny_q: namatad: yup
we are the retarded ones ... LOLOL
there is no god.
religion is the root of all evil
god is a delusion

but go ahead and tells us about how we are the retarded ones

I don't think he was calling all atheists retarded. Just you, personally.


Anybody who feels the need to step into a thread, unbidden, and mock other people for their deeply held personal beliefs is a small-minded douche, regardless of creed.

Everybody just STFU and enjoy the wonder of the Universe.
 
2013-11-03 09:34:41 PM

namatad: machoprogrammer: Why the fark do retarded atheists have to come into every astronomy thread and say "DERP JESUS DERP" and shiat? Is your life really that devoid of meaning?

yup
we are the retarded ones ... LOLOL
there is no god.
religion is the root of all evil
god is a delusion

but go ahead and tells us about how we are the retarded ones


I am an atheist, too. You are just making us look bad by stepping in a thread totally unrelated to religion and mocking other people for their personal beliefs.
 
2013-11-03 09:49:55 PM
A number of M31's star clusters are visible in a backyard-class (8-12") telescope, given dark skies and a good chart.

This one is a good start (beware: large PDF), although it doesn't show the brightest of M31's globular clusters, G1 (aka Mayall II). This is a good chart for that.

M31 also has fourteen or so satellite galaxies, of which two (M32 and M110) are easy in small scopes, two others (NGC 185 and NGC 147) are doable in a 10-12" scope, and the others are targets for larger scopes (a couple are next-to-impossible). NGC 185 can be seen in a 6" scope under a really dark sky; NGC 147 is pretty tough for a 10'12" in even moderate light pollution.
 
2013-11-03 10:49:51 PM
My god...it's full of stars.
 
2013-11-03 10:57:20 PM

GypsyJoker:  NGC 147 is pretty tough for a 10'12" in even moderate light pollution.


That should be 10-12" scope.
 
2013-11-03 11:25:00 PM

GypsyJoker: A number of M31's star clusters are visible in a backyard-class (8-12") telescope, given dark skies and a good chart.

This one is a good start (beware: large PDF), although it doesn't show the brightest of M31's globular clusters, G1 (aka Mayall II). This is a good chart for that.

M31 also has fourteen or so satellite galaxies, of which two (M32 and M110) are easy in small scopes, two others (NGC 185 and NGC 147) are doable in a 10-12" scope, and the others are targets for larger scopes (a couple are next-to-impossible). NGC 185 can be seen in a 6" scope under a really dark sky; NGC 147 is pretty tough for a 10'12" in even moderate light pollution.


Thanks for that.  I find this stuff fascinating, but I have no experience with it.  I'm thinking of getting a nice telescope to look at things with my kids.  What would you recommend?  (I want something portable as I live near Chicago, lots of light pollution, but powerful (I want to see the moons of Saturn and Jupiter really well).
 
2013-11-03 11:55:57 PM

Vacation Bible School: Valiente: Oblig. nice shot of an Andromedan.

[images2.wikia.nocookie.net image 292x271]

[raptorsclaw.files.wordpress.com image 500x585]
/hotttttt


Clearly. If I hadn't found the ST:TOS one, that was my go-to.
 
2013-11-04 12:01:20 AM

machoprogrammer: namatad: machoprogrammer: Why the fark do retarded atheists have to come into every astronomy thread and say "DERP JESUS DERP" and shiat? Is your life really that devoid of meaning?

yup
we are the retarded ones ... LOLOL
there is no god.
religion is the root of all evil
god is a delusion

but go ahead and tells us about how we are the retarded ones

I am an atheist, too. You are just making us look bad by stepping in a thread totally unrelated to religion and mocking other people for their personal beliefs.


You brought up derp jesus. not me. I didnt see any jesus until you.
It is possible that I just have all of them on ignore ...
 
2013-11-04 01:24:13 AM

neuroflare: neuroflare: God the Steelers are bad this year

WRONG THREAD


Still relevant, though.
 
2013-11-04 01:47:44 AM

Director_Mr: So here are some things I spotted.  I divide them up in possible galaxies and unknown weird things.

(possible) Galaxy

x=27957, y=15527
a00:40:14 g=+41:10:04

X=27309, Y=15272
a00:40:24 g=+41:09:21

x=21458, y=20821
a00:41:51 g=+41:24:58

x=24759, y=19165
a00:41:02 g=+41:20:18

Unknown Weird Object

x=23684 y=17900
a:00:41:18 g=+41:16:46

x=26338 y=18046
a00:40:38, g=+41:17:10

x=23606, y=18982
a00:41:19 g=+41:19:48


Quick - to the YouTubez and post yo evidences NAO!!!

/FAKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKEEE!!!
//I really like this, It had almost as much evidences as my favrite one. I found that I could save $$$ by following thes 5 great forggotten secets tat made me lose 50 lbs overnite, and you could to!!!1!
/// I seen better fakes on Pamala Anderson
 
2013-11-04 07:40:55 AM
something like this would make a good fathead
 
2013-11-04 10:52:02 AM

GypsyJoker: That should be 10-12" scope.


I was gonna say, I think a 132" scope could probably resolve NCG-147 without too much difficulty. : )
 
2013-11-04 10:53:16 AM

Director_Mr: GypsyJoker: A number of M31's star clusters are visible in a backyard-class (8-12") telescope, given dark skies and a good chart.

This one is a good start (beware: large PDF), although it doesn't show the brightest of M31's globular clusters, G1 (aka Mayall II). This is a good chart for that.

M31 also has fourteen or so satellite galaxies, of which two (M32 and M110) are easy in small scopes, two others (NGC 185 and NGC 147) are doable in a 10-12" scope, and the others are targets for larger scopes (a couple are next-to-impossible). NGC 185 can be seen in a 6" scope under a really dark sky; NGC 147 is pretty tough for a 10'12" in even moderate light pollution.

Thanks for that.  I find this stuff fascinating, but I have no experience with it.  I'm thinking of getting a nice telescope to look at things with my kids.  What would you recommend?  (I want something portable as I live near Chicago, lots of light pollution, but powerful (I want to see the moons of Saturn and Jupiter really well).


Well, among my recommendations would be to try a few scopes at your local astronomy club, if at all possible.  Nothing will give you a better idea of what you're looking for than some hands-on viewing.  A good pair of binoculars is also a great tool for learning the sky, without paying a lot for optics.

Telescope-wise, you might want to start in the 6" range, which will give you plenty of aperture without the physical and learning burdens of a bigger scope; a 6" is enough to show you plenty of objects without being too cumbersome, and it'll be somewhat easier to maintain (collimation-wise) than a larger, or shorter-focus scope.  I would personally go with a Dobsonian mount, as they're more intuitive to use and generally steadier than a tripod. You won't be able to do photography with it, but it sounds like that's not a primary consideration anyway (yet).  Back in the 60s, a 6" was a luxury scope; nowadays, a lot of big-scope owners use something like a 6" or a small refractor when they don't want to haul and set up a 24"-class scope.

Orion makes  a nice 6" Dob that's pretty no-frills, which is fine; the reflex finder make take a bit of getting used to, but will be better than a standard finder in the long run, and the 25mm eyepiece is a good low-power eyepiece. You might look at getting a 12mm eyepiece or so later on.  Be prepared to practice a bit--finding stuff in the sky (other than the Moon) takes some getting used to and some time learning the constellations.

Feel free to shoot me an e-mail (in my profile), just reference Fark and astronomy so my spam filters don't catch it.
 
2013-11-04 11:02:27 AM

theorellior: GypsyJoker: That should be 10-12" scope.

I was gonna say, I think a 132" scope could probably resolve NCG-147 without too much difficulty. : )


Depends on the light pollution.  :)

Nah, I've (barely) seen it in a 12.5" under limiting-magnitude 5 skies around here (southern Illinois).  It takes dark skies, rather than more aperture, to really see it well.  Faintest object I've seen here was WLM, a dwarf satellite galaxy of the Milky Way in the constellation Cetus.  That was an almost-perfect night here, though.
 
2013-11-04 01:45:57 PM

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Anybody who feels the need to step into a thread, unbidden, and mock other people for their deeply held personal beliefs is a small-minded douche, regardless of creed.


This choice of words has piqued my curiosity.

Are other Farkers being bidden and beckoned into these threads in ways that I am not? Am I... just better off not knowing?

/now feeling uneasy
 
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