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(Guardian)   Two-hour search involving helicopter, dogs, 20+ cops ends when missing three-year-old is found C) in his bedroom, which he'd never left   (theguardian.com) divider line 48
    More: Asinine, Cornwall County Constabulary, helicopters, sniffer dog, dogs, police dogs  
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5061 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Nov 2013 at 10:00 AM (23 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



48 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-11-02 08:02:23 AM
He was under his bed, which I imagine his parents were too afraid to peek under, as it was probably his job to do that for them at night.
 
2013-11-02 09:17:47 AM
Heh, mine did this once. Except she had wiggled into the teeny tiny gap between our solid headboard and the wall. Fortunately I found her before I hit send on the 911 call, but it was a pants-shiatting few minutes of WTF.

Olympic hide and seek, that one.
 
2013-11-02 09:29:27 AM
This is why you need to teach them about the monster who likes little boys and girls in his soup and hangs out under the bed, in the basement, near dangerous things, and drives around in stolen cars offering you rides and candy wearing the skin of local football coaches.
 
2013-11-02 10:08:07 AM
To be fair, it was a large bedroom.
 
2013-11-02 10:09:14 AM
I did that once as a kid. Luckily my parents did the 'in depth house search' before calling the police.
 
2013-11-02 10:09:40 AM
Things like this happen more often than you think.  Children go missing on the time, only to turn up completely okay.

I used to be a cop in a coastal community, with lots of tourist visiting our beaches.  The condos and hotel high rises all look completely the same, and young children will decide to run back to the room without telling anyone.  Problem is, they go into the wrong building.  We normally would find them in the one next door, on the floor corresponding to their floor, back at the correct condo high rise.  This is made worse, since tides tend to move swimmers up or down the beach, and when you factor in way too many parents who don't pay attention.  In fact, it has always amazed me we don't have way more drownings, with the parents are either being asleep on a beach towel, or drunk out of their mind.

I know it isn't as easy keeping track of kids, as childless folk seem to think.  I am a parent myself.  However, when I am out in public, or near water, you better believe I know where my kid is.  Back to the article, I would also check the room and house, including likely hiding holes, before calling the police.  I know five minutes is an eternity when you can't find your kid, but kids like to hide.
 
2013-11-02 10:10:18 AM

doglover: This is why you need to teach them about the monster who likes little boys and girls in his soup and hangs out under the bed, in the basement, near dangerous things, and drives around in stolen cars offering you rides and candy wearing the skin of local football coaches.


I guess he was too young for Sunday school.
 
2013-11-02 10:10:24 AM
LILLY! LILLY!!
 
2013-11-02 10:10:24 AM
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-11-02 10:10:52 AM
I have a cousin that did the same thing.  It's been close to 25 years ago when it happened, so I don't remember if the police had been called in or not before he woke up.
 
2013-11-02 10:13:27 AM
[csb]

Had a niece disappear like this around that age. Had the whole neighborhood running around searching when one neighbor said "they're usually still in the house".

So I went back in and searched again. I found her under the stairs in the basement, sitting on a laundry pile. Probably a dozen people had walked by her calling her name but she just sat there silently - perfectly still.

It was like she was just curious as to what would happen.

[/csb]
 
2013-11-02 10:13:34 AM
Balloon boy laughs at the small scale of your shenanigan.
 
2013-11-02 10:16:25 AM
This is why all toddlers should have remote-activated shock collars...or...you know...something that 'beeps' when you push a button.

/zzzttt!
 
2013-11-02 10:17:03 AM
Invisibility is a common problem.

Once I was in the living room reading a book when I heard somebody ask where I was. One of parents came into the room and looked around, then said I wasn't there. This is not a complicated Victorian room with screens and too much furniture. I was in a clearly visible chair facing the entrance. But I wasn't visible. I was invisible. I said nothing. You mustn't startle delusional people.

I wish I could control it. Think of all the work you could get out of.

How can a parent not see their child right in front of them? I don't know but it has happened to me.

Happens all the time to some people.

How does that work? Maybe it involves magnetism or the tides.
 
2013-11-02 10:17:58 AM
That last bit was just a joke, by the way, at the expense of Juggalos and Bill O'Reilly, two classes of people who have more in common than they know.
 
2013-11-02 10:18:16 AM
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-11-02 10:27:12 AM
Some Coke Drinking Guy, I am childless and I know that many childless people are somewhat judgmental about keeping track of kids and keeping them safe, especially when they read articles that are all harrumphy about parents who have failed to do so.

But I remember that my brother and I, who were enough alike in age to be taken for fraternal twins very often because we were dressed the same to avoid sibling rivalry, would escape our Mother by running off in opposite directions when she was occupied for a moment.

There is no way for a Mother to grab in opposite directions at once, so this tactic was extremely effective in Eaton's Department Store.

Fortunately, she knew where to find us--Children's Toys.

It's all up to chance sometimes. No parent can ensure total security, and it is better to promote resilience and common sense than to fall into the helicopter parent trap. Teach safety but don't rely on security devices and stratagems or you'll end up a Police State Parent.

If children are brought up with love, sense, and consistency, they will almost always turn out all right, and no parent can 100% ensure this with the best will in the world.

Thank God for childlessness. Not everybody does it, not everybody should, like the song says.
 
2013-11-02 10:30:47 AM
I've never misplaced a child like that, but I did spend quite a while looking for one of our cats one time.  Turns out she had crawled into the one of the compartments of the entertainment center cabinet through the hole where the cabling goes in and was quite comfortable there.

/didn't call 911
//did spend some time removing cat fur from the A/V gear
//repeatedly
 
2013-11-02 10:44:33 AM
He managed to climb back into his bedroom and hide under the bed in the knick of time.
Does he have a dog named Brian?
 
2013-11-02 10:57:16 AM
When I was about 2, I climbed out of my crib and hid somewhere in my room. My mother searched the room, couldn't find me. My older brother searched the room, couldn't find me. After they couldn't find me in the rest of the house, they called the police. Two police officers looked in the room, didn't find me. The police, neighbors, everyone was out looking for me for a couple hours before I finally wandered out of the room.
 
2013-11-02 11:08:35 AM
Worst dogs ever.
 
2013-11-02 11:11:31 AM

Amy78: I have a cousin that did the same thing.  It's been close to 25 years ago when it happened...



After 25 years, I'd just say 'f*ck it, he's gone'.
 
2013-11-02 11:15:09 AM
One of our twin 3 year olds loves playing hide and seek by herself without informing anybody. It made us panic the first half-dozen times it happened, but now we just dont care. She just goes off and quietly sits somewhere without making a sound, and is grinning ear to ear when we eventually find her. Thankfully we have a backup child.
 
2013-11-02 11:15:49 AM

brantgoose: Invisibility is a common problem.

Once I was in the living room reading a book when I heard somebody ask where I was. One of parents came into the room and looked around, then said I wasn't there. This is not a complicated Victorian room with screens and too much furniture. I was in a clearly visible chair facing the entrance. But I wasn't visible. I was invisible. I said nothing. You mustn't startle delusional people.

I wish I could control it. Think of all the work you could get out of.

How can a parent not see their child right in front of them? I don't know but it has happened to me.

Happens all the time to some people.

How does that work? Maybe it involves magnetism or the tides.


It's a brain thing. Watch those psychology test films with the gorilla running through the basketball game while trying to count dribbles or passes. You'll never see it.
 
2013-11-02 11:17:28 AM
When I was young my sisters and I played hide and "seek", I hid and they pretended to find me for about 15 seconds.  Later when my parents asked where I was my sisters initially claimed not to know but finally admitted to ditching me.  My parents called for me but my hiding place was so good (crawling under the upstairs bathroom sink and under the eaves) that I could not hear them.  Fortunately they knew I was in the house so they continued to explore and call until I finally heard them and came crawling out.
 
2013-11-02 11:20:18 AM

brantgoose: Invisibility is a common problem.

Once I was in the living room reading a book when I heard somebody ask where I was. One of parents came into the room and looked around, then said I wasn't there. This is not a complicated Victorian room with screens and too much furniture. I was in a clearly visible chair facing the entrance. But I wasn't visible. I was invisible. I said nothing. You mustn't startle delusional people.

I wish I could control it. Think of all the work you could get out of.

How can a parent not see their child right in front of them? I don't know but it has happened to me.

Happens all the time to some people.

How does that work? Maybe it involves magnetism or the tides.


i1.ytimg.com
 
2013-11-02 11:20:39 AM

FnkyTwn: One of our twin 3 year olds loves playing hide and seek by herself without informing anybody. It made us panic the first half-dozen times it happened, but now we just dont care. She just goes off and quietly sits somewhere without making a sound, and is grinning ear to ear when we eventually find her. Thankfully we have a backup child.


That last comment is so wrong yet so full of win.
 
2013-11-02 11:22:16 AM

Amy78: I have a cousin that did the same thing.  It's been close to 25 years ago when it happened, so I don't remember if the police had been called in or not before he woke up.


Funny, I had a cousin who did that too, though *cough* maybe a bit more than 25 years ago.

He was probably all of five or six.
He wasn't an only child, but his closest sibling was probably 15 years older, so he ended up playing with the us and the neighbors kids.
One day he decided to play hide and seek with his family (without telling them of course) and this is what he did:
Throw pillows into closet
Lay down where the pillows go an cover yourself (it was a twin or queen and he was small)
Wait out as family members keep shouting your name all over the house
Silently watch on as people open and close the closets
Once verified he is not in the room, get up, replace pillows and take their place in the cupboard
Wait another two-three hours while the kidhunt expands through the neighborhood.
We get interrogated if we had seen him.
Somebody goes back to the room and finds him there

He was a spoiled kid (age gap), but I think he got a good whipping that day.
 
2013-11-02 11:37:52 AM

brantgoose: Not everybody does it, not everybody should, like the song says.


What song says that?
 
2013-11-02 11:45:16 AM

doglover: This is why you need to teach them about the monster who likes little boys and girls in his soup and hangs out under the bed, in the basement, near dangerous things, and drives around in stolen cars offering you rides and candy wearing the skin of local football coaches.


That's where fairy tales come from.  Don't wander off into the woods, bad things will happen.
 
2013-11-02 11:45:28 AM
Here he is at school
blog.zap2it.com
 
2013-11-02 11:54:38 AM

brantgoose: Invisibility is a common problem.

Once I was in the living room reading a book when I heard somebody ask where I was. One of parents came into the room and looked around, then said I wasn't there. This is not a complicated Victorian room with screens and too much furniture. I was in a clearly visible chair facing the entrance. But I wasn't visible. I was invisible. I said nothing. You mustn't startle delusional people.

I wish I could control it. Think of all the work you could get out of.

How can a parent not see their child right in front of them? I don't know but it has happened to me.

Happens all the time to some people.

How does that work? Maybe it involves magnetism or the tides.


It's an ugly day when children learn to use this to their advantage. Like when they want to stay up past bedtime to watch the show with you (the one guaranteed to give them nightmares - usually Dr Who in our house). If they plead and beg, up they go. If they bounce around and call attention to themselves, they're done for. If, however, they get ready for bed, brush their teeth, kiss everyone goodnight, gather up their stuffys, and then sit down very quietly in the armchair in the corner and remain calm and still, they become invisible and can watch the show. Which does, of course, give them nightmares. Every stinkin' time.
 
2013-11-02 11:55:42 AM

brandent: doglover: This is why you need to teach them about the monster who likes little boys and girls in his soup and hangs out under the bed, in the basement, near dangerous things, and drives around in stolen cars offering you rides and candy wearing the skin of local football coaches.

That's where fairy tales come from.  Don't wander off into the woods, bad things will happen.


But it's true
 
2013-11-02 11:58:55 AM

Resident Muslim: Amy78: I have a cousin that did the same thing.  It's been close to 25 years ago when it happened, so I don't remember if the police had been called in or not before he woke up.

Funny, I had a cousin who did that too, though *cough* maybe a bit more than 25 years ago.

He was probably all of five or six.
He wasn't an only child, but his closest sibling was probably 15 years older, so he ended up playing with the us and the neighbors kids.
One day he decided to play hide and seek with his family (without telling them of course) and this is what he did:
Throw pillows into closet
Lay down where the pillows go an cover yourself (it was a twin or queen and he was small)
Wait out as family members keep shouting your name all over the house
Silently watch on as people open and close the closets
Once verified he is not in the room, get up, replace pillows and take their place in the cupboard
Wait another two-three hours while the kidhunt expands through the neighborhood.
We get interrogated if we had seen him.
Somebody goes back to the room and finds him there

He was a spoiled kid (age gap), but I think he got a good whipping that day.


Ha, I came in here to post a similar story about my own brilliant Hide and Seek strategy at a family reunion.  But I just crawled under the pillows and stretched out face down.  Folded the blanket back over me all neat and tidy with a roll and tuck move.  One or two cousins would bap the top of the pillows but never thought to take the bed apart looking for me.  Then they started yelling through the house that the game was over and I had to come out now.  I probably would have come out if I wasn't related to a bunch of Annoying Childhood Friend memes made flesh.  I finally came out after I heard the adults calling for me though.
 
2013-11-02 12:31:26 PM
Once, my wife and I were babysitting for some friends and their 3 year old boy had vanished from his bed. The back door had been un-latched (by his older sister we later found out). We searched the yard and were ready to call the police when my wife found him in a dirty laundry basket, filled with clothes, fast asleep. He missed his Mommy and crawled onto a t shirt of hers. Moral of the story; Search the house top to bottom when it involves toddlers.
 
2013-11-02 12:31:43 PM
Isn't this a well known humorous story?
Kid mispronounces helicopter?

******************************

The boss of a big company needed to call one of his employees about an
urgent problem with one of the main computers. He dialed the employees
home phone number and was greeted with a child's whispered, "Hello?"

Feeling put out at the inconvenience of having to talk to a youngster
the boss asked," Is your Daddy home?"

"Yes", whispered the small voice. "May I talk with him?" the man asked.
To the surprise of the boss, the small voice whispered, "No."

Wanting to talk with an adult, the boss asked," Is your Mommy there?"

"Yes", came the answer. "May I talk with her?" Again
the small voice whispered, "no".

Knowing that it was not likely that a young child would be left home
alone, the boss decided he would just leave a message with the person
who should be there watching over the child. "Is there anyone there
besides you?" the boss asked the child.

"Yes" whispered the child, "A policeman". Wondering what a cop would be
doing at his employee's home, the boss asked "May I speak with the
policeman"?

"No, he's busy", whispered the child." Busy doing
what?, asked the boss. "Talking to Daddy and Mommy and the Fireman",
came the whispered answer.

 Growing concerned and even worried as he heard what sounded like a
helicopter through the ear piece on the phone the boss asked, "What is
that noise?"
 "A hello-copper", answered the whispering voice. "What is going on
there?", asked the boss, now alarmed.

In an awed whispering voice the child answered, "The search team just
landed the hello-copper"
Alarmed, concerned and more than just a little frustrated the boss
asked, "Why are they there"?

Still whispering, the young voice replied along with a muffled giggle:

"They're looking for me"
 
2013-11-02 12:36:58 PM

olddeegee: Moral of the story; Search the house top to bottom when it involves toddlers.


Once caught one of the kids trying to hide in the clothes dryer. Don't know if I would have thought to look in there.
 
2013-11-02 12:37:24 PM

FnkyTwn: One of our twin 3 year olds loves playing hide and seek by herself without informing anybody. It made us panic the first half-dozen times it happened, but now we just dont care. She just goes off and quietly sits somewhere without making a sound, and is grinning ear to ear when we eventually find her. Thankfully we have a backup child.


Hahaha. I showed this to my SO and he was first alarmed (during the missing child part) and then laughing his ass off at the last part.

/37.5 weeks pregnant
//singleton so no spares
///not growing any spares either so hopefully this kid is resourceful and doesn't Darwin himself
 
2013-11-02 01:15:39 PM
My wife has a similar story. Her three year old brother crawled behind the couch in the living room and fell asleep. Police-searching hilarity ensued until he woke up and crawled out.
 
2013-11-02 01:45:22 PM
That's why the kid needs to eat more, if he was a fatty he would never have fit under the bed.

Oreos - helping parents find kids for over 50 years
 
2013-11-02 02:02:08 PM

brantgoose: Invisibility is a common problem.



Kids persist in their belief of invisibility for a long time and they also believe others have the power. Behold, anybody over 30 can tell you that teenagers will A) not notice an "old" persons within two feet of them and B) do really stupid stuff only to be shocked to learn it was witnessed by someone.
 
GBB
2013-11-02 02:17:19 PM
I can't even begin to tell you of all the times that <Headline> has happened here.  Usually it's less than 2 hours.
 
2013-11-02 02:18:53 PM

NorthernMT: FnkyTwn: One of our twin 3 year olds loves playing hide and seek by herself without informing anybody. It made us panic the first half-dozen times it happened, but now we just dont care. She just goes off and quietly sits somewhere without making a sound, and is grinning ear to ear when we eventually find her. Thankfully we have a backup child.

That last comment is so wrong yet so full of win.


Nope, still a fail.  Everyone knows you're supposed to keep your backups offsite.
 
2013-11-02 03:34:23 PM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Amy78: I have a cousin that did the same thing.  It's been close to 25 years ago when it happened...


After 25 years, I'd just say 'f*ck it, he's gone'.


Dude owes him money.
 
2013-11-02 05:51:15 PM
He was wrestling the crocodile.

i.huffpost.com
 
2013-11-02 07:54:51 PM

cgremlin: I've never misplaced a child like that, but I did spend quite a while looking for one of our cats one time.  Turns out she had crawled into the one of the compartments of the entertainment center cabinet through the hole where the cabling goes in and was quite comfortable there.

/didn't call 911
//did spend some time removing cat fur from the A/V gear
//repeatedly


Audiophiles pay big bucks for cat hair coated cables...
 
2013-11-03 03:52:17 AM
When my kids would disappear out of bed, the first place I looked was under the bed. Of course that only works if the kid isn't a moving target. Always found the kids within a few minutes.

I did have a niece disappear once. After an hour of neighbors searching the neighborhood (had about 10 people looking, didn't call 911 yet) I found her asleep against the back wall of the bathroom between the tub and clothes hamper curled up in under a towel.
 
2013-11-03 06:11:06 PM

aevorea: //singleton so no spares


Haha.. I've always considered 'singleton' a slightly derogatory term.. at least that's the way I use it.  :)

Congrats on 37.5 weeks. My wife made it 36 weeks (full term for twins), and they were nearly 6lbs each (which is huuuge for twins). You're in the home stretch now. My only recommendation is a baby monitor with a camera. It helps the nerves to visually know if you're hearing cute little cooing sounds, or last gasp gurgles, or if they've managed to pull their blanket over their face... but you're a long way from loose blankets or mini blankets.

People in the hospital will ask you if this is your first child to know where you are on the scale of freaking out.
 
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