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(NJ.com)   You can dump nuclear waste, medical waste, chemical waste, but dirt? on a construction site? That is a line we cannot cross   (nj.com) divider line 34
    More: Stupid, medical waste, nuclear waste, Union County  
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2805 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Nov 2013 at 4:49 PM (23 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



34 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-11-01 04:52:19 PM
You can't legally dump any of those things.  Runoff killing local streams is a big deal.  Not all pollution is glowing green sludge like from the cartoons.
 
2013-11-01 04:53:10 PM

ikanreed: You can't legally dump any of those things.  Runoff killing local streams is a big deal.  Not all pollution is glowing green sludge like from the cartoons.


Yeah and it rarely creates CHUDS.
 
2013-11-01 04:53:53 PM
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-11-01 04:54:35 PM
Also, unrestricted dumping of materials, even dirt, on a construction site could instabilities in the foundation of buildings built over the site.
 
2013-11-01 04:55:17 PM
Trespassing is illegal, film at 11.
 
2013-11-01 04:55:51 PM

Holfax: Also, unrestricted dumping of materials, even dirt, on a construction site could instabilities in the foundation of buildings built over the site.


introduce instabilities, that is.
 
2013-11-01 04:56:32 PM
Plus the dirt has to go somewhere, and the construction company will now have to pay for its removal.
 
2013-11-01 04:57:14 PM
How much is a dump-truck worth of dirt again?

It ain't exactly


Dirt Cheap!
 
2013-11-01 04:57:53 PM
It's not just dirt.  It is unknown dirt.  Now the construction site owner will have to have the soil tested and if it comes back dirty he will have to pay to have it properly disposed of.

 A ton of medical waste could be potentially cheaper to get rid of than a ton of bad dirt.
 
2013-11-01 05:03:16 PM
you need to be in the union to dump that dirt.
 
2013-11-01 05:03:52 PM

ikanreed: You can't legally dump any of those things.  Runoff killing local streams is a big deal.  Not all pollution is glowing green sludge like from the cartoons.


sure you can legally dispose of hazardous waste.....http://toxmap.nlm.nih.gov/toxmap/main/index.jsp
 
2013-11-01 05:04:48 PM

Torqueknot: It's not just dirt.  It is unknown dirt.  Now the construction site owner will have to have the soil tested and if it comes back dirty he will have to pay to have it properly disposed of.

 A ton of medical waste could be potentially cheaper to get rid of than a ton of bad dirt.


Heh, dirty dirt.

/Yeah, I know
//Could be nuclear dirt
 
2013-11-01 05:07:16 PM
I currently have two large piles of dirt from excavation of a foundation for an addition (just plain old dirt, no contaminants), sitting in my yard that my contractor's trying to find someone to take (that doesn't involve expensive trucking to some spot 100 miles away), so I'm definitely not getting a kick out of this...
 
2013-11-01 05:15:25 PM

CygnusDarius: Torqueknot: It's not just dirt.  It is unknown dirt.  Now the construction site owner will have to have the soil tested and if it comes back dirty he will have to pay to have it properly disposed of.

 A ton of medical waste could be potentially cheaper to get rid of than a ton of bad dirt.

Heh, dirty dirt.

/Yeah, I know
//Could be nuclear dirt


It could be....

*sunglasses*

Joe's Dirt...


/i feel ashamed now
 
2013-11-01 05:28:44 PM

Torqueknot: It's not just dirt.  It is unknown dirt.  Now the construction site owner will have to have the soil tested and if it comes back dirty he will have to pay to have it properly disposed of.

 A ton of medical waste could be potentially cheaper to get rid of than a ton of bad dirt.


Hopefully the testing gives some clues to the source. I wonder if it is nasty stuff if the contractor's insurance against site vandalism will help pay for the disposal.

\lot of ifs in there though
 
2013-11-01 05:35:10 PM
one sentence articles should be illegal.
 
2013-11-01 05:36:08 PM
You don't dump nuclear waste. You store it or you process it. It really depends what kind of waste we're discussing. Some things have to be long-term stored, some things can be recycled, some things can be cleaned and kicked out as clean waste. It's a long cost-benefit analysis. The only real exception to this is small amounts of low-level radioactive water and gas that are vented to environment (and we know more about that stuff than the local johns know about yo momma).

If memory serves, the two most expensive things to dispose of are mixed waste, and spent resin. Mixed waste usually implies oils or other chemicals that require special handing, and you're looking at thousands upon thousands of dollars even if it's a low radiological hazard. I worked at one plant that had an entire tank of contaminated diesel fuel. Having no real recourse to get rid of it, it's regularly tested and permanently stored as their 'we are beyond farked and need diesel fuel' tank.

Spent resin is the other way. It's a huge dose hazard, generally speaking. Yeah you might have just dirty spent resin from making water so clean it's inadvisable to drink (deionized water is actually hazmat), but you also get resin from the tanks that are pulling crap out of reactor coolant and that shiat can light you up fast. Not to mention it's an industrial hazard. If it spills, everything is covered with tiny slick beads that get everywhere. They're difficult to clean up and redefine trip hazard. If resin spills happen the area's usually locked down so no one breaks their neck. It's worse than walking on oil.

/there is no price on 'disposal or processing' of spent fuel at this time as there is no disposal or processing in the USA
//it's just parked on site while we all sue the government for not holding up their end of this deal
///hi, I work in radiation protection
 
2013-11-01 05:39:11 PM

Jeng: How much is a dump-truck worth of dirt again?

It ain't exactly


Dirt Cheap!


well, that depends...if you have it and don't want it, you have to pay to have it taken away. If you want it but don't have it, you have to pay to have it brought to you.


The best deal would seem to be having a friend who wants to get rid of the same amount of dirt you need...then you only pay for the transport
 
2013-11-01 05:52:06 PM

Priapetic: I currently have two large piles of dirt from excavation of a foundation for an addition (just plain old dirt, no contaminants), sitting in my yard that my contractor's trying to find someone to take (that doesn't involve expensive trucking to some spot 100 miles away), so I'm definitely not getting a kick out of this...


Just get a couple yards of those grass squares and plant em over the dirt. BOOM. Now instead of piles of dirt your yard has hills. You're welcome.
 
2013-11-01 05:55:46 PM
Stormwater Management and Pollution Prevention is a huge deal for us in Construction. Fines for even mundane infractions run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars.
 
2013-11-01 05:57:58 PM
and that article is totally useless.
 
2013-11-01 05:59:26 PM

Massively Multiplayer Addict: one sentence articles should be illegal.


I so farking hated the write a ### page report regarding ******, sorry I can sum it up in one sentence, why should I write 20 times that amount?
 
2013-11-01 06:15:01 PM

Ringshadow: You don't dump nuclear waste. You store it or you process it. It really depends what kind of waste we're discussing. Some things have to be long-term stored, some things can be recycled, some things can be cleaned and kicked out as clean waste. It's a long cost-benefit analysis. The only real exception to this is small amounts of low-level radioactive water and gas that are vented to environment (and we know more about that stuff than the local johns know about yo momma).

If memory serves, the two most expensive things to dispose of are mixed waste, and spent resin. Mixed waste usually implies oils or other chemicals that require special handing, and you're looking at thousands upon thousands of dollars even if it's a low radiological hazard. I worked at one plant that had an entire tank of contaminated diesel fuel. Having no real recourse to get rid of it, it's regularly tested and permanently stored as their 'we are beyond farked and need diesel fuel' tank.

Spent resin is the other way. It's a huge dose hazard, generally speaking. Yeah you might have just dirty spent resin from making water so clean it's inadvisable to drink (deionized water is actually hazmat), but you also get resin from the tanks that are pulling crap out of reactor coolant and that shiat can light you up fast. Not to mention it's an industrial hazard. If it spills, everything is covered with tiny slick beads that get everywhere. They're difficult to clean up and redefine trip hazard. If resin spills happen the area's usually locked down so no one breaks their neck. It's worse than walking on oil.

/there is no price on 'disposal or processing' of spent fuel at this time as there is no disposal or processing in the USA
//it's just parked on site while we all sue the government for not holding up their end of this deal
///hi, I work in radiation protection


You might still get some use out of that spent resin in cleaning up congress...
 
2013-11-01 06:18:09 PM
Did heavy construction in New Jersey.  At a bridge job once, during the weekend, someone dumped six loads of dirt on my site.  It reeked of diesel.
 
2013-11-01 06:20:11 PM

Priapetic: I currently have two large piles of dirt from excavation of a foundation for an addition (just plain old dirt, no contaminants), sitting in my yard that my contractor's trying to find someone to take (that doesn't involve expensive trucking to some spot 100 miles away), so I'm definitely not getting a kick out of this...


Just dig a hole and bury it; i don't see what the problem is here.
 
2013-11-01 06:22:01 PM
EPA Clean Water Act has a lot to say about dirt. If its exposed, storm water runoff will carry it to the waterways and it'll do a lot of damage. So now, the owner/operator of the site is going to be regulated to include the pile on their storm water pollution prevention plan, and take measures to contain it (such as silt fences, inspections, etc). So yeah, it's a big hassle for the site and an additional liability, even if its clean dirt.
 
2013-11-01 06:50:33 PM

Jeng: Massively Multiplayer Addict: one sentence articles should be illegal.

I so farking hated the write a ### page report regarding ******, sorry I can sum it up in one sentence, why should I write 20 times that amount?


i'm sure there's more than one sentence worth of information that could be told regarding the incident in question.
 
2013-11-01 07:36:42 PM

ikanreed: You can't legally dump any of those things.  Runoff killing local streams is a big deal.  Not all pollution is glowing green sludge like from the cartoons.


So there's no such thing a oozing green radioactive sludge?.
 
2013-11-01 08:00:49 PM
As everyone has said, mystery dirt could be a nightmare to deal with. If they are lucky it was just some idiot who needed to get rid of some extra dirt on their property who moved it to be the construction companies problem who figured that they were moving dirt around so another pile is no big deal.  If they are unlucky, it is contaminated dirt from some source (say a gas station replacing tanks that leaked) that now will add thousands and thousands of dollars to the construction companies bill in order to dispose of properly.  State and Federal laws can be very expensive to comply with so I hope it is the former an not the latter.
 
2013-11-01 08:16:49 PM

Torqueknot: It's not just dirt.  It is unknown dirt.  Now the construction site owner will have to have the soil tested and if it comes back dirty he will have to pay to have it properly disposed of.

 A ton of medical waste could be potentially cheaper to get rid of than a ton of bad dirt.


This. Also, say there's a bad storm/flood that causes that loose soil to cause a mudslide on a nearby roadway, the owner/contractor could face a boatload of fines and potential lawsuits.

Part of breaking ground at any new site involves erosion control measures, storm water runoff controls, and other methods to keep contaminates from the site from affecting surrounding areas. You can't just stick a shovel in the ground and start digging without approved permits.
 
2013-11-01 11:06:21 PM
One lousy paragraph? This is a story? This worthy of a green? What a damn waste! Both subby and whoever didn't check this out should be ashamed!
 
2013-11-02 09:32:19 AM

Torqueknot: It's not just dirt.  It is unknown dirt.  Now the construction site owner will have to have the soil tested and if it comes back dirty he will have to pay to have it properly disposed of.

 A ton of medical waste could be potentially cheaper to get rid of than a ton of bad dirt.


Well yeah, medical waste you just dump in the ocean and let the beach goers dispose of it one syringe picked out of a foot at a time
 
2013-11-02 09:33:26 AM

Priapetic: I currently have two large piles of dirt from excavation of a foundation for an addition (just plain old dirt, no contaminants), sitting in my yard that my contractor's trying to find someone to take (that doesn't involve expensive trucking to some spot 100 miles away), so I'm definitely not getting a kick out of this...


Solution: Get a shovel. Each day you toss a scoop into the nieghbor's yard. (If you have several neighbors touching your property, this goes faster). You do this gradualy enough that your neighbor doesn't notice, and comes to accept the pile as having 'always been there'.
 
2013-11-02 01:53:18 PM

MythDragon: Priapetic: I currently have two large piles of dirt from excavation of a foundation for an addition (just plain old dirt, no contaminants), sitting in my yard that my contractor's trying to find someone to take (that doesn't involve expensive trucking to some spot 100 miles away), so I'm definitely not getting a kick out of this...

Solution: Get a shovel. Each day you toss a scoop into the nieghbor's yard. (If you have several neighbors touching your property, this goes faster). You do this gradualy enough that your neighbor doesn't notice, and comes to accept the pile as having 'always been there'.


PROTIP: Don't do this when the neighbor is watching.
 
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