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(The Day)   Coast Guard documents confirm that the mysterious floating buildings on either coast do, in fact, involve Google   (theday.com) divider line 72
    More: Followup, Coast Guard, New London, Google, New York Harbor, documents  
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5257 clicks; posted to Geek » on 01 Nov 2013 at 1:48 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-01 01:51:35 PM  
Our long national nightmare is finally over
 
2013-11-01 01:53:16 PM  
At first I thought "Google is preparing to start their own country at sea" but then I saw barges and thought "They'll never get into international waters."
 
2013-11-01 01:59:54 PM  

simplicimus: At first I thought "Google is preparing to start their own country at sea" but then I saw barges and thought "They'll never get into international waters."


Ask any Coastie, people will attempt the damnest things with boats.

/USCG brat
 
2013-11-01 02:00:18 PM  
Enhanced Interrogation Centers
 
2013-11-01 02:05:02 PM  
Hmm, data centers you can float to the harbor of a country with cheap IT labor? Floating housing for foreign IT workers who don't qualify for green cards but could possibly commute from ship to shore for "business".
 
2013-11-01 02:05:05 PM  
Datacenters for Healthcare.gov.
 
2013-11-01 02:05:07 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: simplicimus: At first I thought "Google is preparing to start their own country at sea" but then I saw barges and thought "They'll never get into international waters."

Ask any Coastie, people will attempt the damnest things with boats.

/USCG brat


Yes, but you'd figure Google might do some research first, see if such a thing is feasible.

Not really sure where they'd do the research though.
 
2013-11-01 02:07:42 PM  
The longest and most destructive party ever held is now into its fourth generation, and still no one shows any signs of leaving. Somebody did once look at his watch, but that was eleven years ago, and there has been no follow-up.
The mess is extraordinary, and has to be seen to be believed, but if you don't have any particular need to believe it, then don't go and look, because you won't enjoy it.
There have recently been some bangs and flashes up in the clouds, and there is one theory that this is a battle being fought between the fleets of several rival carpet-cleaning companies who are hovering over the thing like vultures, but you shouldn't believe anything you hear at parties, and particularly not anything you hear at this one.
One of the problems, and it's one which is obviously going to get worse, is that all the people at the party are either the children or the grandchildren or the great-grandchildren of the people who wouldn't leave in the first place, and because of all the business about selective breeding and regressive genes and so on, it means that all the people now at the party are either absolutely fanatical partygoers, or gibbering idiots, or, more and more frequently, both.
Either way, it means that, genetically speaking, each succeeding generation is now less likely to leave than the preceding one.
So other factors come into operation, like when the drink is going to run out.
Now, because of certain things which have happened which seemed like a good idea at the time (and one of the problems with a party which never stops is that all the things which only seem like a good idea at parties continue to seem like good ideas), that point seems still to be a long way off.
One of the things which seemed like a good idea at the time was that the party should fly --- not in the normal sense that parties are meant to fly, but literally.
One night, long ago, a band of drunken astro-engineers of the first generation clambered round the building digging this, fixing that, banging very hard on the other and when the sun rose the following morning, it was startled to find itself shining on a building full of happy drunken people which was now floating like a young and uncertain bird over the treetops.
 
2013-11-01 02:24:10 PM  
Okay. So what is it?
 
2013-11-01 02:25:24 PM  
Just finished Dave Eggers' "The Circle". It is a maddening story about a Google-like company in the near future, filled with naive idealists, that ultimately manages to infiltrate all manner of public and private spaces, networks, and systems with "transparency" technology. Everybody, every place, everything on the planet is monitored by the company, and viewable by anyone on the planet. A good read, as usual, from Eggers.

I'm glad that story is fictional, currently. It does make me a little nervous when Google is constructing shady floating whatevers, though I don't think they have the mojo to really try something audaciously pervasive, yet. I guess the NSA doesn't need barges to do all of that...
 
2013-11-01 02:26:23 PM  
Hot pluggable data center expansion modules?
 
2013-11-01 02:27:12 PM  

Marine1: Okay. So what is it?


I've never seen one before - no one has - but I'm guessing it's a white hole.
 
2013-11-01 02:35:22 PM  

HighOnCraic: The longest and most destructive party ever held is now into its fourth generation, and still no one shows any signs of leaving. Somebody did once look at his watch, but that was eleven years ago, and there has been no follow-up.
The mess is extraordinary, and has to be seen to be believed, but if you don't have any particular need to believe it, then don't go and look, because you won't enjoy it.
There have recently been some bangs and flashes up in the clouds, and there is one theory that this is a battle being fought between the fleets of several rival carpet-cleaning companies who are hovering over the thing like vultures, but you shouldn't believe anything you hear at parties, and particularly not anything you hear at this one.
One of the problems, and it's one which is obviously going to get worse, is that all the people at the party are either the children or the grandchildren or the great-grandchildren of the people who wouldn't leave in the first place, and because of all the business about selective breeding and regressive genes and so on, it means that all the people now at the party are either absolutely fanatical partygoers, or gibbering idiots, or, more and more frequently, both.
Either way, it means that, genetically speaking, each succeeding generation is now less likely to leave than the preceding one.
So other factors come into operation, like when the drink is going to run out.
Now, because of certain things which have happened which seemed like a good idea at the time (and one of the problems with a party which never stops is that all the things which only seem like a good idea at parties continue to seem like good ideas), that point seems still to be a long way off.
One of the things which seemed like a good idea at the time was that the party should fly --- not in the normal sense that parties are meant to fly, but literally.
One night, long ago, a band of drunken astro-engineers of the first generation clambered round the building digging this ...


You have added to my belief that any thread can be Hitchhiker thread

/and Fark truncates comments? learn something today.
 
2013-11-01 02:35:51 PM  

Marine1: Okay. So what is it?


Google Seaview.
 
2013-11-01 02:39:07 PM  
Google needed someplace to store its money.
 
2013-11-01 02:44:49 PM  

simplicimus: At first I thought "Google is preparing to start their own country at sea" but then I saw barges and thought "They'll never get into international waters."


so would they have to only get 12 miles out or 200 miles out to sea?  a data enclave unencumbered by national laws or privacy restrictions?
 
2013-11-01 02:45:47 PM  

red5ish: Google needed someplace to store its money.


Is the mattress already full? Damn
 
2013-11-01 02:48:13 PM  
Pretty extensive viral marketing going on with all this.  Wonder what the bill is.
 
2013-11-01 02:50:19 PM  

wildcardjack: Hmm, data centers you can float to the harbor of a country with cheap IT labor?


Doubtful, why would this benefit from being afloat?

cdn.slashgear.com

This is Google, so multiply that by several hundred thousand?
 
2013-11-01 02:51:31 PM  

Marine1: Okay. So what is it?


Look a few threads down.
 
2013-11-01 02:54:01 PM  
Floating tera-flop houses.
 
2013-11-01 02:54:56 PM  

StopLurkListen: wildcardjack: Hmm, data centers you can float to the harbor of a country with cheap IT labor?

Doubtful, why would this benefit from being afloat?

[cdn.slashgear.com image 850x566]

This is Google, so multiply that by several hundred thousand?


Easy access to coolant, for a start.
 
2013-11-01 02:56:05 PM  
FTAThe barge in San Francisco Bay is "BAL0010." The barge that was in New London is BAL0011

In binary, that's "BAL2" and "BAL3". Where's "BAL1"? We need to find the source!
 
2013-11-01 02:56:23 PM  

StopLurkListen: wildcardjack: Hmm, data centers you can float to the harbor of a country with cheap IT labor?

Doubtful, why would this benefit from being afloat?

[cdn.slashgear.com image 850x566]

This is Google, so multiply that by several hundred thousand?


Operating in international waters.
 
2013-11-01 02:58:21 PM  

Marine1: StopLurkListen: wildcardjack: Hmm, data centers you can float to the harbor of a country with cheap IT labor?

Doubtful, why would this benefit from being afloat?

[cdn.slashgear.com image 850x566]

This is Google, so multiply that by several hundred thousand?

Operating in international waters.


Nobody to prosecute when somebody attaches a limpet mine
 
2013-11-01 03:00:13 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: Marine1: StopLurkListen: wildcardjack: Hmm, data centers you can float to the harbor of a country with cheap IT labor?

Doubtful, why would this benefit from being afloat?

[cdn.slashgear.com image 850x566]

This is Google, so multiply that by several hundred thousand?

Operating in international waters.

Nobody to prosecute when somebody attaches a limpet mine


Or when someone wants a wiretap warrant.
 
2013-11-01 03:09:47 PM  

beezeltown: It does make me a little nervous when Google is constructing shady floating whatevers, though I don't think they have the mojo to really try something audaciously pervasive, yet.


I'm sure, if necessary, they'll listen to Reason.
 
2013-11-01 03:10:46 PM  

Marine1: Smeggy Smurf: Marine1: StopLurkListen: wildcardjack: Hmm, data centers you can float to the harbor of a country with cheap IT labor?

Doubtful, why would this benefit from being afloat?

[cdn.slashgear.com image 850x566]

This is Google, so multiply that by several hundred thousand?

Operating in international waters.

Nobody to prosecute when somebody attaches a limpet mine

Or when someone wants a wiretap warrant.


I'd think the power requirements for a data center would be the prime concern. Not just 'enough' power; they need reliable, uninterrupted power. Hooking up to a pier's power? Yeah, right. Running your own generator? I don't know if that's very attractive either. Next would be data transmission. To what? Satellite? Would that provide high enough transmission rates? Google actually transfers massive amounts of data via "sneakernet".
 
2013-11-01 03:17:50 PM  
So Google left a floater. Big deal.
 
2013-11-01 03:20:51 PM  

paswa17: FTA -  The barge in San Francisco Bay is "BAL0010." The barge that was in New London is BAL0011

In binary, that's "BAL2" and "BAL3". Where's "BAL1"? We need to find the source!


Sitting next to BAL0. If we are going geek, go all the way.
 
2013-11-01 03:35:22 PM  

GameSprocket: paswa17: FTA -  The barge in San Francisco Bay is "BAL0010." The barge that was in New London is BAL0011

In binary, that's "BAL2" and "BAL3". Where's "BAL1"? We need to find the source!

Sitting next to BAL0. If we are going geek, go all the way.


Nah, it's like releasing 3 pigs labelled 1, 3 & 4.  Spend too much time looking for pig 2 to pay attention to what the others have done.
 
2013-11-01 03:35:33 PM  
Apparently it's gonna be a store for Google glass. Now I make great use of a number of Google products, but the last thing I want in my life is another screen to look at. Ain't getting no iwatch, ain't getting no Google glass.
 
2013-11-01 03:37:19 PM  

StopLurkListen: I'd think the power requirements for a data center would be the prime concern. Not just 'enough' power; they need reliable, uninterrupted power.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_energy

There are several different ways of extracting reliable, uninterrupted power from the ocean.  And that doesn't include solar or wind (which are more periodic).
 
2013-11-01 03:43:04 PM  

johnny_vegas: simplicimus: At first I thought "Google is preparing to start their own country at sea" but then I saw barges and thought "They'll never get into international waters."

so would they have to only get 12 miles out or 200 miles out to sea?  a data enclave unencumbered by national laws or privacy restrictions?


Maybe it's preparations for World War Z?
 
2013-11-01 03:46:11 PM  

dittybopper: StopLurkListen: I'd think the power requirements for a data center would be the prime concern. Not just 'enough' power; they need reliable, uninterrupted power.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_energy

There are several different ways of extracting reliable, uninterrupted power from the ocean.  And that doesn't include solar or wind (which are more periodic).


He is right, however, regarding data connections. You'd typically anchor these in a harbor where you can get several thick runs of fiber. Theoretically, you could also use several microwave transmitters for line of sight, but that still keeps you within 10 miles of shore, and wave motion may affect your s/n ratio.
However, he's missed the point regarding cooling.
 
2013-11-01 03:48:53 PM  
Has no one caught the obvious factor?

One on each coast.

Redundancy.

A single attack cannot cripple the system.

Google has become Skynet.
 
2013-11-01 03:52:34 PM  

johnny_vegas: simplicimus: At first I thought "Google is preparing to start their own country at sea" but then I saw barges and thought "They'll never get into international waters."

so would they have to only get 12 miles out or 200 miles out to sea?  a data enclave unencumbered by national laws or privacy restrictions?


They are still incorporated in the US, as long as they wish to do business in this country and hire US citizens they have to follow our laws even if their data is located elsewhere.
 
2013-11-01 03:52:57 PM  

Theaetetus: dittybopper: StopLurkListen: I'd think the power requirements for a data center would be the prime concern. Not just 'enough' power; they need reliable, uninterrupted power.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_energy

There are several different ways of extracting reliable, uninterrupted power from the ocean.  And that doesn't include solar or wind (which are more periodic).

He is right, however, regarding data connections. You'd typically anchor these in a harbor where you can get several thick runs of fiber. Theoretically, you could also use several microwave transmitters for line of sight, but that still keeps you within 10 miles of shore, and wave motion may affect your s/n ratio.
However, he's missed the point regarding cooling.


They can lay their own underwater fibre on the way.
 
2013-11-01 03:53:12 PM  
Just another step in Google's long slide from "Do no evil" to "Do what a supervillain would do" .
 
2013-11-01 03:55:39 PM  

dittybopper: StopLurkListen: I'd think the power requirements for a data center would be the prime concern. Not just 'enough' power; they need reliable, uninterrupted power.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_energy

There are several different ways of extracting reliable, uninterrupted power from the ocean.  And that doesn't include solar or wind (which are more periodic).


True, Google's good about trying to get green power for their data centers.

But being hooked up to a grid is very useful if you value reliable power. (not just uptime: operating in narrow voltage tolerances. That gets harder when you're off-grid and machinery is cycling on/off.)

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/10/08/230520905/nsa-says-it -h as-mitigated-meltdowns-at-utah-data-farm

"The Journal says project documents show that "chronic electrical surges ... have destroyed hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of machinery and delayed the center's opening for a year.""

Dunno if they were off-grid but the article mentions problems with "backup" generators.
 
2013-11-01 04:02:53 PM  

Theaetetus: dittybopper: StopLurkListen: I'd think the power requirements for a data center would be the prime concern. Not just 'enough' power; they need reliable, uninterrupted power.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_energy

There are several different ways of extracting reliable, uninterrupted power from the ocean.  And that doesn't include solar or wind (which are more periodic).

He is right, however, regarding data connections. You'd typically anchor these in a harbor where you can get several thick runs of fiber. Theoretically, you could also use several microwave transmitters for line of sight, but that still keeps you within 10 miles of shore, and wave motion may affect your s/n ratio.
However, he's missed the point regarding cooling.


We don't know that it's a "data center", though.  That's an assumption based upon the reported fact that Google is somehow involved.

In fact, we don't even know if the ultimate destination for these things are oceanic.  That they are on barges argues against that.  Seems more appropriate for use at coastal sites and inland waterways.
 
2013-11-01 04:10:25 PM  
BNL...is this a farkin joke?

www.brickthrewglass.com
 
2013-11-01 04:17:31 PM  

Gaseous Anomaly: beezeltown: It does make me a little nervous when Google is constructing shady floating whatevers, though I don't think they have the mojo to really try something audaciously pervasive, yet.

I'm sure, if necessary, they'll listen to Reason.


Those "antenna" are really rat thing houses. Google will never listen to Reason.
 
2013-11-01 04:34:10 PM  
 
2013-11-01 04:39:17 PM  
Ah, I see Google has entered the sinister "Phase II" of its operations.
 
2013-11-01 04:40:18 PM  

dittybopper: Theaetetus: dittybopper: StopLurkListen: I'd think the power requirements for a data center would be the prime concern. Not just 'enough' power; they need reliable, uninterrupted power.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_energy

There are several different ways of extracting reliable, uninterrupted power from the ocean.  And that doesn't include solar or wind (which are more periodic).

He is right, however, regarding data connections. You'd typically anchor these in a harbor where you can get several thick runs of fiber. Theoretically, you could also use several microwave transmitters for line of sight, but that still keeps you within 10 miles of shore, and wave motion may affect your s/n ratio.
However, he's missed the point regarding cooling.

We don't know that it's a "data center", though.  That's an assumption based upon the reported fact that Google is somehow involved.

In fact, we don't even know if the ultimate destination for these things are oceanic.  That they are on barges argues against that.  Seems more appropriate for use at coastal sites and inland waterways.


I'm thinking maybe they plan on being stationary most of the time, if they are data centers. Being on barges, they are mobile and can move to alternate locations. Think of it as "disaster avoidance" vs "disaster recovery".
 
2013-11-01 05:19:49 PM  
From the news stories I've read google is basically going to do a "traveling show" of its wears, mainly google glass. Nobody will actually go aboard the containers while they are on the barges, but rather google will float them up to a port, unload them, re-assemble them on some unused plot of land, stay for a bit, then pack up the whole shebang and move on to the next city. Kind of like a high-tech circus. As they are standard shipping containers they can also travel by rail to get more inland cities, which I assume will also happen.
 
2013-11-01 06:28:57 PM  
Their WiFi is broadcasting as 'NSA surveillance boat' & they are going to NY Harbor to troll the locals
 
433 [TotalFark]
2013-11-01 06:31:05 PM  

Lord Dimwit: Ah, I see Google has entered the sinister "Phase II" of its operations.


media.theonion.com

Wish I could have found the logo.
 
2013-11-01 06:54:56 PM  

meddleRPI: Has no one caught the obvious factor?

One on each coast.

Redundancy.

A single attack cannot cripple the system.

Google has become Skynet.


we are done here. goodbye.
 
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