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(ABC)   Explorers find a shipwreck of a steamer at the bottom of Lake Ontario. No one even knew that Carnival once did cruises on the Great Lakes   (abcnews.go.com) divider line 40
    More: Interesting, Lake Ontario, Oswego, remotely operated vehicles, Great Lakes, Orion  
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5278 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Nov 2013 at 10:46 AM (36 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-11-01 09:02:43 AM
It's good they found it in October since the lake, it is said, never gives up her dead when the skies of November turn gloomy.
 
2013-11-01 09:06:23 AM
Its too bad they didn't find it in Lake Erie, I really wanted to make a "Cleveland Steamer" joke.
 
2013-11-01 09:07:16 AM

Sybarite: It's good they found it in October since the lake, it is said, never gives up her dead when the skies of November turn gloomy.


Came for this reference, leaving satisfied.
 
2013-11-01 09:45:52 AM

Sybarite: It's good they found it in October since the lake, it is said, never gives up her dead when the skies of November turn gloomy.


That's Superior, Lake Ontario picks up lake Lake Erie will send her.
 
2013-11-01 09:52:13 AM
As the big steamers go, it was bigger than most
 
2013-11-01 09:53:51 AM

Tom_Slick: Sybarite: It's good they found it in October since the lake, it is said, never gives up her dead when the skies of November turn gloomy.

That's Superior, Lake Ontario picks up lake Lake Erie will send her.


"Hey guys, what rhymes with Roberval?" - Gordon Lightfoot
 
2013-11-01 09:59:59 AM

nekom: Came for this reference, leaving satisfied.


Nah. Wrong lake.
 
2013-11-01 10:46:06 AM
It didn't sail out of Cleavland did it?
 
2013-11-01 10:49:31 AM
poop joke.
 
2013-11-01 10:49:55 AM

nekom: Sybarite: It's good they found it in October since the lake, it is said, never gives up her dead when the skies of November turn gloomy.

Came for this reference, leaving satisfied.


Likewise.

It would have been an even bigger surprise if it had sailed from Cincinnati.
 
2013-11-01 10:57:15 AM
Wow. I bet all that spruce is worth some money if they can haul it to the surface.
 
2013-11-01 10:58:23 AM
I don't know what it is but there is something that really creeps me the fark out about a lake that is hundreds of feet deep. I don't mind the ocean and its depths but a freshwater body that deep feels evil.
 
2013-11-01 11:00:25 AM
Man, the survivors rowed 35 miles in nine hours? I'm sure they chose that destination to take advantage of the wind, but that's some serious hauling in an old-school wooden lifeboat.
 
2013-11-01 11:02:09 AM
Gitchigumi
 
2013-11-01 11:04:55 AM

vodka: I don't know what it is but there is something that really creeps me the fark out about a lake that is hundreds of feet deep. I don't mind the ocean and its depths but a freshwater body that deep feels evil.


We got ponds that deep in Vermont.
We once had a team of horses break through the ice on Island Pond and they floated to the surface on Long Pond.
 
2013-11-01 11:05:35 AM

vodka: I don't know what it is but there is something that really creeps me the fark out about a lake that is hundreds of feet deep. I don't mind the ocean and its depths but a freshwater body that deep feels evil.


Not at all, come on in the water is fine.
 
2013-11-01 11:06:24 AM

vernonFL: Its too bad they didn't find it in Lake Erie, I really wanted to make a "Cleveland Steamer" joke.


Damn it. I had a good one ready to go till I saw your post.
 
2013-11-01 11:07:48 AM
The first thing to come to my mind was the sinking of the Mariposa Belle (which did not, however, sink on Lake Ontario, but very near it):

I don't know whether you know Mariposa. If not, it is of no consequence, for if you know Canada at all, you are probably well acquainted with a dozen towns just like it.

There it lies in the sunlight, sloping up from the little lake that spreads out at the foot of the hillside on which the town is built. There is a wharf beside the lake, and lying alongside of it a steamer that is tied to the wharf with two ropes of about the same size as they use on the Lusitania. The steamer goes nowhere in particular, for the lake is landlocked and there is no navigation for the Mariposa Belle except to "run trips" on the first of July and the Queen's Birthday, and to take excursions of the Knights of Pythias and the Sons of Temperance to and from the Local Option Townships.


Isn't that beautiful?

You can read the rest at Gutenberg: Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town by Stephen Leacock. The Mariposa Belle sinks in Chapter Three, "The Marine Excursions of the Knights of Pythias".

Leacock wrote of Mariposa (based on Orillea, Ontario) with the wry, gentle, kindly cynicism of Jane Austen discussing the financial arrangements of a country parsonage. It is beautiful Horatian but sharp irony, like a cat with its claws only partially extended. Alanis Morissette should have read this book in grade nine English.
 
2013-11-01 11:08:24 AM

vodka: I don't know what it is but there is something that really creeps me the fark out about a lake that is hundreds of feet deep. I don't mind the ocean and its depths but a freshwater body that deep feels evil.


Don't go to the Finger Lakes up in central NY then.  Those suckers are deeper the the Great Lakes.  US Navy tests sonar in them since they are do deep, cold as hell too since they are spring fed.
 
2013-11-01 11:10:28 AM

vodka: I don't know what it is but there is something that really creeps me the fark out about a lake that is hundreds of feet deep. I don't mind the ocean and its depths but a freshwater body that deep feels evil.


Totally agree. I can ski all day with no problems. When it starts to get dark its like that scene from the second Riddick when they are racing sunrise to get to the ship.
 
2013-11-01 11:13:17 AM
I left a shipwreck of a steamer this morning myself
 
2013-11-01 11:15:53 AM

vodka: I don't know what it is but there is something that really creeps me the fark out about a lake that is hundreds of feet deep. I don't mind the ocean and its depths but a freshwater body that deep feels evil.


What's got you bothered by glaciers? They just wanted to leave their mark.

It all depends on where one grew up. I spent my childhood on Lake Ontario but Im terrified of Sharks in the Ocean so I don't surf.

That being said, I turned on a Gordon Lightfoot Pandora station. :)
 
2013-11-01 11:18:10 AM
The sinking of the Mariposa is one of the greatest slow-motion disasters of all time:

You may talk as you will about the intoning choirs of your European cathedrals, but the sound of "O--Can-a-da," borne across the waters of a silent lake at evening is good enough for those of us who know Mariposa.

I think that it was just as they were singing like this: "O--Can-a-da," that word went round that the boat was sinking.

If you have ever been in any sudden emergency on the water, you will understand the strange psychology of it,--the way in which what is happening seems to become known all in a moment without a word being said. The news is transmitted from one to the other by some mysterious process.

At any rate, on the Mariposa Belle first one and then the other heard that the steamer was sinking. As far as I could ever learn the first of it was that George Duff, the bank manager, came very quietly to Dr. Gallagher and asked him if he thought that the boat was sinking. The doctor said no, that he had thought so earlier in the day but that he didn't now think that she was.

After that Duff, according to his own account, had said to Macartney, the lawyer, that the boat was sinking, and Macartney said that he doubted it very much.

Then somebody came to Judge Pepperleigh and woke him up and said that there was six inches of water in the steamer and that she was sinking. And Pepperleigh said it was perfect scandal and passed the news on to his wife and she said that they had no business to allow it and that if the steamer sank that was the last excursion she'd go on.


The irony is so thick you'd think it would buoy up the boat. Perhaps it does.

SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER

What? Hadn't I explained about the depth of Lake Wissanotti? I had taken it for granted that you knew; and in any case parts of it are deep enough, though I don't suppose in this stretch of it from the big reed beds up to within a mile of the town wharf, you could find six feet of water in it if you tried. Oh, pshaw! I was not talking about a steamer sinking in the ocean and carrying down its screaming crowds of people into the hideous depths of green water. Oh, dear me no! That kind of thing never happens on Lake Wissanotti.

But what does happen is that the Mariposa Belle sinks every now and then, and sticks there on the bottom till they get things straightened up.

On the lakes round Mariposa, if a person arrives late anywhere and explains that the steamer sank, everybody understands the situation.


You see when Harland and Wolff built the Mariposa Belle, they left some cracks in between the timbers that you fill up with cotton waste every Sunday. If this is not attended to, the boat sinks. In fact, it is part of the law of the province that all the steamers like the Mariposa Belle must be properly corked,--I think that is the word,--every season. There are inspectors who visit all the hotels in the province to see that it is done.

Of course, Lake Ontario is a might sea compared to Lake Whatzit. When steam boats sink on the Great Lakes, they might as well be sinking in the Ocean. But somehow the Mariposa Belle never managed to sink in the Ocean or Lake Ontario, or even in the Harbour at Toronto. She spent her final days making more farewell tours than Cher.

But it takes a comic genius to make that funny, unlike Cher.
 
2013-11-01 11:27:04 AM

OldManDownDRoad: Man, the survivors rowed 35 miles in nine hours? I'm sure they chose that destination to take advantage of the wind, but that's some serious hauling in an old-school wooden lifeboat.


They didn't row that distance:

Three crew members made it to a leaky lifeboat and spent nine hours rowing to Oswego, located 35 miles north of Syracuse.
...
Kennard, of Fairport, said the Roberval sank in water more than 300 feet deep, about 16 miles off Oswego.


So they actually averaged (16/9) = 1.8 MPH.  Sounds eminently doable.
 
2013-11-01 11:29:16 AM

xtalman: vodka: I don't know what it is but there is something that really creeps me the fark out about a lake that is hundreds of feet deep. I don't mind the ocean and its depths but a freshwater body that deep feels evil.

Don't go to the Finger Lakes up in central NY then.  Those suckers are deeper the the Great Lakes.  US Navy tests sonar in them since they are do deep, cold as hell too since they are spring fed.


And stay away from Loch Ness. It is one of those long thin lakes that are deeper than Lake Averno, the mouth of Hell. It's almost a fyord, more or less cut off from the sea, and you can readily believe there's a monster in it if you realize how deep it is. True, there's not much to feed a monster--just a bit of salmon, but it is close enough to the sea that the odd seal may find its way across land if it is really stubborn and stupid. Perhaps that is what the monster is.

On the other hand, it is deep enough to have solenoid waves, which are a type of single wave tsunami that strikes without warning. On Loch Ness, these waves may only be a ripple at the surface, but they could move a floating log or stump in ways that seem purposeful and even animated.

The deepest lake in the world is Lake Baikal, in Siberia. It is in rift where the continent tore but did not break. It may not look like much from the surface, but it contains an awesome amount of water due to its depth. It's a good lake for everybody nervous of water to avoid. it contains roughly 20% of the world's fresh water because it is over a mile deep (1642 m or 5,387 ft.). 20% and it covers an area of 12,248 square miles. Compare with Lake Eire or Lake Ontario.

It is also the clearest lake in the world and the oldest lake in the world.

In other words, it's gorgeous but scary
 
2013-11-01 11:42:52 AM

brantgoose: The first thing to come to my mind was the sinking of the Mariposa Belle (which did not, however, sink on Lake Ontario, but very near it):

I don't know whether you know Mariposa. If not, it is of no consequence, for if you know Canada at all, you are probably well acquainted with a dozen towns just like it.

There it lies in the sunlight, sloping up from the little lake that spreads out at the foot of the hillside on which the town is built. There is a wharf beside the lake, and lying alongside of it a steamer that is tied to the wharf with two ropes of about the same size as they use on the Lusitania. The steamer goes nowhere in particular, for the lake is landlocked and there is no navigation for the Mariposa Belle except to "run trips" on the first of July and the Queen's Birthday, and to take excursions of the Knights of Pythias and the Sons of Temperance to and from the Local Option Townships.

Isn't that beautiful?

You can read the rest at Gutenberg: Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town by Stephen Leacock. The Mariposa Belle sinks in Chapter Three, "The Marine Excursions of the Knights of Pythias".

Leacock wrote of Mariposa (based on Orillia, Ontario) with the wry, gentle, kindly cynicism of Jane Austen discussing the financial arrangements of a country parsonage. It is beautiful Horatian but sharp irony, like a cat with its claws only partially extended. Alanis Morissette should have read this book in grade nine English.


I live in Orillia right now.  There is nothing wry, gentle or kindly about my cynicism regarding this benighted town.

/nobody came to the door trick or treating because the neighbourhood parents were too drunk
 
2013-11-01 11:57:08 AM

Evil Mackerel: vodka: I don't know what it is but there is something that really creeps me the fark out about a lake that is hundreds of feet deep. I don't mind the ocean and its depths but a freshwater body that deep feels evil.

Not at all, come on in the water is fine.


Yeah, after all,

cdn.meme.li

/beep, beep
 
2013-11-01 12:26:23 PM
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-11-01 12:35:25 PM
Bondith:

I live in Orillia right now.  There is nothing wry, gentle or kindly about my cynicism regarding this benighted town.

/nobody came to the door trick or treating because the neighbourhood parents were too drunk


Couchiching, Couchiching, by Lake Couchiching.
 
2013-11-01 12:39:04 PM
seem applicable . . .
imgs.xkcd.com


\\ larger one . . .
 
2013-11-01 01:24:15 PM
Meh, I live on the Best Coast.

We have DEEP lakes out here.
 
2013-11-01 01:35:27 PM
More detailed article here.
 
2013-11-01 01:49:12 PM

xtalman: vodka: I don't know what it is but there is something that really creeps me the fark out about a lake that is hundreds of feet deep. I don't mind the ocean and its depths but a freshwater body that deep feels evil.

Don't go to the Finger Lakes up in central NY then.  Those suckers are deeper the the Great Lakes.  US Navy tests sonar in them since they are do deep, cold as hell too since they are spring fed.


The deepest parts of all but Lake Erie are deeper than the deepest parts of any of the finger lakes.
 
2013-11-01 03:16:52 PM
FTA:  "A second crewman went down with the ship when the shifting timber trapped him in a forward compartment."

Now that is a shiatty way to go.  Stuck in a dark steel compartment, slowly suffocating, the water inching up and up and up...

/saw Redford's new flick, All Is Lost
//similar scene, almost
///damn good movie
 
2013-11-01 03:22:58 PM
Bondith:
I live in Orillia right now.  There is nothing wry, gentle or kindly about my cynicism regarding this benighted town.

/nobody came to the door trick or treating because the neighbourhood parents were too drunk


This is consistent with my experiences in Orillia.  The family had a cottage between Brechin and Atherley, and then I did some work at the Uhthoff quarry years later.  What exactly does one do in Orillia these days?
 
2013-11-01 03:29:28 PM

brantgoose: It is also the clearest lake in the world and the oldest lake in the world.


You need to mention FRESHWATER SEALS!

I'm an aquatic geochemist who loves the Great Lakes, but L. Baikal wins for the freshwater seals. Google them. They are the cutest of cute.
 
2013-11-01 03:41:10 PM
In case anyone, like me, came for pics and left disappointed: here!
 
2013-11-01 03:42:57 PM
It would be Carnival if it were adrift and full of poop.
 
2013-11-01 06:14:28 PM

Honest Geologist: Bondith:
I live in Orillia right now.  There is nothing wry, gentle or kindly about my cynicism regarding this benighted town.

/nobody came to the door trick or treating because the neighbourhood parents were too drunk

This is consistent with my experiences in Orillia.  The family had a cottage between Brechin and Atherley, and then I did some work at the Uhthoff quarry years later.  What exactly does one do in Orillia these days?


Hide from the locals.  I'm in scumtown, because this was the only apartment available for rent in the entire goddamn city when I moved here (everything else was a room in someone's basement).  Anyone my age worth associating with left town after high school to go to university and never came back.  Anyone who stayed pumped out two or three kids before they hit 21.  Hanging out with married people when you're not married sucks donkey balls.  All they talk about is kids.

The local nerds are deeply disappointing as well.  They're all late teens/early twenties, so it's penis jokes, casual misogyny and gamer funk that can strip paint.

Six more months of this...
 
2013-11-02 12:33:15 PM
So United Sates of Canada?
Or should we be looking for a sunken train?

bcuniversal.com

/Obscure?
 
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