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(AP)   Problem: Five kids under 16 have died playing football in the last two months. NFL solution: Let's hire Dr. Oz to teach moms about safe tackling   (hosted.ap.org) divider line 48
    More: Fail, Dr. Oz, NFL, Let's, blistered the ball, broken neck, flag football, USA Football  
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590 clicks; posted to Sports » on 30 Oct 2013 at 7:00 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



48 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-10-30 04:46:37 PM
FTA: More than 25,000 football players from 8 to 19 years old seek treatment for concussions at emergency rooms every year.

That's just concussions. I wonder what the total number of ER visits from football is.
 
2013-10-30 04:55:49 PM
That's absolutely disgusting.
 
2013-10-30 05:03:50 PM
Im not sure that is the NFLs problem, but given the evidence, I wouldn't be surprised if more schools and parents changed the game for high schools.
 
2013-10-30 05:06:50 PM
Um...did flag football get uninvented?
 
2013-10-30 05:07:31 PM
But Dr. Oz says it's OK. So it must be.
 
2013-10-30 05:09:31 PM
I bet when you figure the actual number of kids who play football versus the death rate, I bet it's higher then the per capita death rate from firearms.
 
2013-10-30 05:10:35 PM

Triumph: FTA: More than 25,000 football players from 8 to 19 years old seek treatment for concussions at emergency rooms every year.

That's just concussions. I wonder what the total number of ER visits from football is.


Maybe have a breakdown of all sports. I suffered a few injuries from football and had to go to the hospital. But I also had to go from sledding too. So for me sledding was as dangerous as playing football. Knocked myself out once from playing tug o war (Rope broke and I went flying into a piano). Hell busted myself up pretty bad crashing on my bike. Honestly being a clumsy uncoordinated kid meant that almost everything I did I would end up hurt, I never injured myself playing with lawn darts though...
 
2013-10-30 05:20:12 PM

ginandbacon: That's absolutely disgusting.


I know. How can a man teach a woman about tackling? There's a small but very important differences in center of mass and physiology that make it different.
 
2013-10-30 05:24:34 PM

doglover: ginandbacon: That's absolutely disgusting.

I know. How can a man teach a woman about tackling? There's a small but very important differences in center of mass and physiology that make it different.


LOL COME HERE!!!! I'LL TEACH YOU ABOUT TACKLING!!!
 
2013-10-30 05:33:32 PM
5 kids out of how many millions who play intramural football? It's a tragedy at the personal level, but without accurate statistics, I can't get outraged about this. 5 deaths is not a trend.
 
2013-10-30 05:37:51 PM

Tellingthem: Triumph: FTA: More than 25,000 football players from 8 to 19 years old seek treatment for concussions at emergency rooms every year.

That's just concussions. I wonder what the total number of ER visits from football is.

Maybe have a breakdown of all sports. I suffered a few injuries from football and had to go to the hospital. But I also had to go from sledding too. So for me sledding was as dangerous as playing football. Knocked myself out once from playing tug o war (Rope broke and I went flying into a piano). Hell busted myself up pretty bad crashing on my bike. Honestly being a clumsy uncoordinated kid meant that almost everything I did I would end up hurt, I never injured myself playing with lawn darts though...


This is what I found after a quick Google:


Comparing sports fatalities
Direct fatalities per 100,000 participants (measured from the 1982-83 academic year through 2002-03):

High school
Boys gymnastics 1.15
Boys soccer 0.11
Baseball 0.08
Boys wrestling 0.04
Boys lacrosse 0.48
Boys basketball 0.02
Boys hockey 0.37
Softball 0.02
Football 0 .31
Girls track 0.01
Boys track 0.18

All other sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 0.73, third-highest below hockey (1.29) and gymnastics (1.15).

College
Women's skiing 7.98
Football 0.57
Men's lacrosse 1.79
Men's track 0.41
Baseball 0.63
Men's basketball 0.34

All other college sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 5.18, behind women's hockey (11.66), men's gymnastics (7.33) and men's hockey (6.25).

So, surprisingly enough, you have a greater chance of dying or being seriously injured playing hockey or participating in gymnastics than playing football.
 
2013-10-30 05:46:33 PM

cgraves67: 5 kids out of how many millions who play intramural football? It's a tragedy at the personal level, but without accurate statistics, I can't get outraged about this. 5 deaths is not a trend.


The main problem with football isn't death, it's injuries. They are usually several injuries in every single football game played. Knees, spines, concussions - they can carry a lasting price.
 
2013-10-30 05:49:56 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Tellingthem: Triumph: FTA: More than 25,000 football players from 8 to 19 years old seek treatment for concussions at emergency rooms every year.

That's just concussions. I wonder what the total number of ER visits from football is.

Maybe have a breakdown of all sports. I suffered a few injuries from football and had to go to the hospital. But I also had to go from sledding too. So for me sledding was as dangerous as playing football. Knocked myself out once from playing tug o war (Rope broke and I went flying into a piano). Hell busted myself up pretty bad crashing on my bike. Honestly being a clumsy uncoordinated kid meant that almost everything I did I would end up hurt, I never injured myself playing with lawn darts though...

This is what I found after a quick Google:


Comparing sports fatalities
Direct fatalities per 100,000 participants (measured from the 1982-83 academic year through 2002-03):

High school
Boys gymnastics 1.15
Boys soccer 0.11
Baseball 0.08
Boys wrestling 0.04
Boys lacrosse 0.48
Boys basketball 0.02
Boys hockey 0.37
Softball 0.02
Football 0 .31
Girls track 0.01
Boys track 0.18

All other sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 0.73, third-highest below hockey (1.29) and gymnastics (1.15).

College
Women's skiing 7.98
Football 0.57
Men's lacrosse 1.79
Men's track 0.41
Baseball 0.63
Men's basketball 0.34

All other college sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 5.18, behind women's hockey (11.66), men's gymnastics (7.33) and men's hockey (6.25).

So, surprisingly enough, you have a greater chance of dying or being seriously injured playing hockey or participating in gymnastics than playing football.


Kind of makes sense I guess except for womens hockey. How the fark do so many get injured when they aren't even allowed to check?
 
2013-10-30 05:52:47 PM

TuteTibiImperes: So, surprisingly enough, you have a greater chance of dying or being seriously injured playing hockey or participating in gymnastics than playing football.


I played on the racquetball teal in college and the gymnasium was next to our courts. We'd sneak in and try out the trampolines once in a while. They were seriously dangerous.
 
2013-10-30 05:57:48 PM

Tellingthem: TuteTibiImperes: Tellingthem: Triumph: FTA: More than 25,000 football players from 8 to 19 years old seek treatment for concussions at emergency rooms every year.

That's just concussions. I wonder what the total number of ER visits from football is.

Maybe have a breakdown of all sports. I suffered a few injuries from football and had to go to the hospital. But I also had to go from sledding too. So for me sledding was as dangerous as playing football. Knocked myself out once from playing tug o war (Rope broke and I went flying into a piano). Hell busted myself up pretty bad crashing on my bike. Honestly being a clumsy uncoordinated kid meant that almost everything I did I would end up hurt, I never injured myself playing with lawn darts though...

This is what I found after a quick Google:


Comparing sports fatalities
Direct fatalities per 100,000 participants (measured from the 1982-83 academic year through 2002-03):

High school
Boys gymnastics 1.15
Boys soccer 0.11
Baseball 0.08
Boys wrestling 0.04
Boys lacrosse 0.48
Boys basketball 0.02
Boys hockey 0.37
Softball 0.02
Football 0 .31
Girls track 0.01
Boys track 0.18

All other sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 0.73, third-highest below hockey (1.29) and gymnastics (1.15).

College
Women's skiing 7.98
Football 0.57
Men's lacrosse 1.79
Men's track 0.41
Baseball 0.63
Men's basketball 0.34

All other college sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 5.18, behind women's hockey (11.66), men's gymnastics (7.33) and men's hockey (6.25).

So, surprisingly enough, you have a greater chance of dying or being seriously injured playing hockey or participating in gymnastics than playing football.

Kind of makes sense I guess except for womens hockey. How the fark do so many get injured when they aren't even allowed to check?


Interesting question. Better question - why aren't they allowed to check?
 
2013-10-30 05:58:27 PM

Tellingthem: T

All other college sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 5.18, behind women's hockey (11.66), men's gymnastics (7.33) and men's hockey (6.25).

So, surprisingly enough, you have a greater chance of dying or being seriously injured playing hockey or participating in gymnastics than playing football.

Kind of makes sense I guess except for womens hockey. How the fark do so many get injured when they aren't even allowed to check?


Plus, women's hockey almost always means 'field hockey' and not 'ice hockey'.  Ice hockey I could maybe see being injury prone due to the skates, speeds involved, and the hard ice, but I'm with you, I'm not sure how so many women are becoming seriously injured playing field hockey.
 
2013-10-30 05:59:16 PM

Triumph: TuteTibiImperes: So, surprisingly enough, you have a greater chance of dying or being seriously injured playing hockey or participating in gymnastics than playing football.

I played on the racquetball teal in college and the gymnasium was next to our courts. We'd sneak in and try out the trampolines once in a while. They were seriously dangerous.


Gymnastics and/or cheerleading at the college level are absurdly dangerous when it comes to major injuries requiring hospital trips (some of which result in death).
 
2013-10-30 06:03:02 PM

Shame Us: Tellingthem: TuteTibiImperes: Tellingthem: Triumph: FTA: More than 25,000 football players from 8 to 19 years old seek treatment for concussions at emergency rooms every year.

That's just concussions. I wonder what the total number of ER visits from football is.

Maybe have a breakdown of all sports. I suffered a few injuries from football and had to go to the hospital. But I also had to go from sledding too. So for me sledding was as dangerous as playing football. Knocked myself out once from playing tug o war (Rope broke and I went flying into a piano). Hell busted myself up pretty bad crashing on my bike. Honestly being a clumsy uncoordinated kid meant that almost everything I did I would end up hurt, I never injured myself playing with lawn darts though...

This is what I found after a quick Google:


Comparing sports fatalities
Direct fatalities per 100,000 participants (measured from the 1982-83 academic year through 2002-03):

High school
Boys gymnastics 1.15
Boys soccer 0.11
Baseball 0.08
Boys wrestling 0.04
Boys lacrosse 0.48
Boys basketball 0.02
Boys hockey 0.37
Softball 0.02
Football 0 .31
Girls track 0.01
Boys track 0.18

All other sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 0.73, third-highest below hockey (1.29) and gymnastics (1.15).

College
Women's skiing 7.98
Football 0.57
Men's lacrosse 1.79
Men's track 0.41
Baseball 0.63
Men's basketball 0.34

All other college sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 5.18, behind women's hockey (11.66), men's gymnastics (7.33) and men's hockey (6.25).

So, surprisingly enough, you have a greater chance of dying or being seriously injured playing hockey or participating in gymnastics than playing football.

Kind of makes sense I guess except for womens hockey. How the fark do so many get injured when they aren't even allowed to check?

Interesting question. Better question - why aren't they allowed to check?


Honestly no idea. I always figured it was from the old school thought that girls were small and weak and can't take a hit. But after these numbers maybe there is some truth to that. If that many already get injured without checking...
 
2013-10-30 06:05:01 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Tellingthem: T

All other college sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 5.18, behind women's hockey (11.66), men's gymnastics (7.33) and men's hockey (6.25).

So, surprisingly enough, you have a greater chance of dying or being seriously injured playing hockey or participating in gymnastics than playing football.

Kind of makes sense I guess except for womens hockey. How the fark do so many get injured when they aren't even allowed to check?

Plus, women's hockey almost always means 'field hockey' and not 'ice hockey'.  Ice hockey I could maybe see being injury prone due to the skates, speeds involved, and the hard ice, but I'm with you, I'm not sure how so many women are becoming seriously injured playing field hockey.


Oh yeah forgot about that. But looking up ice hockey they still seem to have a much higher rate of injury including concussions.
 
2013-10-30 06:06:44 PM

ginandbacon: doglover: ginandbacon: That's absolutely disgusting.

I know. How can a man teach a woman about tackling? There's a small but very important differences in center of mass and physiology that make it different.

LOL COME HERE!!!! I'LL TEACH YOU ABOUT TACKLING!!!


nesbittrealty.com

/The focus simulates Thanksgiving booze levels.
 
2013-10-30 06:10:48 PM

Shame Us: Tellingthem: TuteTibiImperes: Tellingthem: Triumph: FTA: More than 25,000 football players from 8 to 19 years old seek treatment for concussions at emergency rooms every year.

That's just concussions. I wonder what the total number of ER visits from football is.

Maybe have a breakdown of all sports. I suffered a few injuries from football and had to go to the hospital. But I also had to go from sledding too. So for me sledding was as dangerous as playing football. Knocked myself out once from playing tug o war (Rope broke and I went flying into a piano). Hell busted myself up pretty bad crashing on my bike. Honestly being a clumsy uncoordinated kid meant that almost everything I did I would end up hurt, I never injured myself playing with lawn darts though...

This is what I found after a quick Google:


Comparing sports fatalities
Direct fatalities per 100,000 participants (measured from the 1982-83 academic year through 2002-03):

High school
Boys gymnastics 1.15
Boys soccer 0.11
Baseball 0.08
Boys wrestling 0.04
Boys lacrosse 0.48
Boys basketball 0.02
Boys hockey 0.37
Softball 0.02
Football 0 .31
Girls track 0.01
Boys track 0.18

All other sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 0.73, third-highest below hockey (1.29) and gymnastics (1.15).

College
Women's skiing 7.98
Football 0.57
Men's lacrosse 1.79
Men's track 0.41
Baseball 0.63
Men's basketball 0.34

All other college sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 5.18, behind women's hockey (11.66), men's gymnastics (7.33) and men's hockey (6.25).

So, surprisingly enough, you have a greater chance of dying or being seriously injured playing hockey or participating in gymnastics than playing football.

Kind of makes sense I guess except for womens hockey. How the fark do so many get injured when they aren't even allowed to check?

Interesting question. Better question - why aren't they allowed to check?


Maybe it has something to do with wearing the same pads through three periods.
 
2013-10-30 06:15:55 PM

doglover: ginandbacon: doglover: ginandbacon: That's absolutely disgusting.

I know. How can a man teach a woman about tackling? There's a small but very important differences in center of mass and physiology that make it different.

LOL COME HERE!!!! I'LL TEACH YOU ABOUT TACKLING!!!

[nesbittrealty.com image 850x440]

/The focus simulates Thanksgiving booze levels.


Ahahahahahahahahahahaha!

*icouldyotallytakeyou*
 
2013-10-30 06:59:28 PM

Tellingthem: TuteTibiImperes: Tellingthem: T

All other college sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 5.18, behind women's hockey (11.66), men's gymnastics (7.33) and men's hockey (6.25).

So, surprisingly enough, you have a greater chance of dying or being seriously injured playing hockey or participating in gymnastics than playing football.

Kind of makes sense I guess except for womens hockey. How the fark do so many get injured when they aren't even allowed to check?

Plus, women's hockey almost always means 'field hockey' and not 'ice hockey'.  Ice hockey I could maybe see being injury prone due to the skates, speeds involved, and the hard ice, but I'm with you, I'm not sure how so many women are becoming seriously injured playing field hockey.

Oh yeah forgot about that. But looking up ice hockey they still seem to have a much higher rate of injury including concussions.


I'm wondering if there is a higher incidence of reporting injury amongst female athletes than their male counterparts. Male athletes routinely keep what they consider to be nagging or minimal injuries like mild-moderate concussions and muscle pulls to themselves for fear of losing playing time or looking like a pussy. Especially in hockey where it's common practice to get stitched up and be back on the ice within minutes. I wonder if that's the difference.
 
2013-10-30 07:03:06 PM
"...hire Dr. Oz to teach moms about safe tackling "

Is that a euphemism?  cause I think I am all in, but I just want to make sure what i am signing up for
 
2013-10-30 07:04:09 PM
Maybe if your little snowflake had a decent pair of hands and could catch the ball, he wouldn't be playing on defense and worrying about tackling in the first place.
 
2013-10-30 07:09:37 PM

Shame Us: Tellingthem: TuteTibiImperes: Tellingthem: T

All other college sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 5.18, behind women's hockey (11.66), men's gymnastics (7.33) and men's hockey (6.25).

So, surprisingly enough, you have a greater chance of dying or being seriously injured playing hockey or participating in gymnastics than playing football.

Kind of makes sense I guess except for womens hockey. How the fark do so many get injured when they aren't even allowed to check?

Plus, women's hockey almost always means 'field hockey' and not 'ice hockey'.  Ice hockey I could maybe see being injury prone due to the skates, speeds involved, and the hard ice, but I'm with you, I'm not sure how so many women are becoming seriously injured playing field hockey.

Oh yeah forgot about that. But looking up ice hockey they still seem to have a much higher rate of injury including concussions.

I'm wondering if there is a higher incidence of reporting injury amongst female athletes than their male counterparts. Male athletes routinely keep what they consider to be nagging or minimal injuries like mild-moderate concussions and muscle pulls to themselves for fear of losing playing time or looking like a pussy. Especially in hockey where it's common practice to get stitched up and be back on the ice within minutes. I wonder if that's the difference.


Well, the stats said they tracked deaths and 'serious injuries'.  I'm not sure how 'serious injury' is defined, but I'd assume it wouldn't include things like scrapes, cuts, strained/pulled muscles, etc.
 
2013-10-30 07:11:27 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Shame Us: Tellingthem: TuteTibiImperes: Tellingthem: T

All other college sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 5.18, behind women's hockey (11.66), men's gymnastics (7.33) and men's hockey (6.25).

So, surprisingly enough, you have a greater chance of dying or being seriously injured playing hockey or participating in gymnastics than playing football.

Kind of makes sense I guess except for womens hockey. How the fark do so many get injured when they aren't even allowed to check?

Plus, women's hockey almost always means 'field hockey' and not 'ice hockey'.  Ice hockey I could maybe see being injury prone due to the skates, speeds involved, and the hard ice, but I'm with you, I'm not sure how so many women are becoming seriously injured playing field hockey.

Oh yeah forgot about that. But looking up ice hockey they still seem to have a much higher rate of injury including concussions.

I'm wondering if there is a higher incidence of reporting injury amongst female athletes than their male counterparts. Male athletes routinely keep what they consider to be nagging or minimal injuries like mild-moderate concussions and muscle pulls to themselves for fear of losing playing time or looking like a pussy. Especially in hockey where it's common practice to get stitched up and be back on the ice within minutes. I wonder if that's the difference.

Well, the stats said they tracked deaths and 'serious injuries'.  I'm not sure how 'serious injury' is defined, but I'd assume it wouldn't include things like scrapes, cuts, strained/pulled muscles, etc.


Of course. Forgot the source of the stats being "serious" injury.
 
2013-10-30 07:15:50 PM
grokca:

Interesting question. Better question - why aren't they allowed to check?

Maybe it has something to do with wearing the same pads thr ...


I'll be sending you the bill for my new keyboard.
 
2013-10-30 07:18:17 PM

Shame Us: Tellingthem: TuteTibiImperes: Tellingthem: T

All other college sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 5.18, behind women's hockey (11.66), men's gymnastics (7.33) and men's hockey (6.25).

So, surprisingly enough, you have a greater chance of dying or being seriously injured playing hockey or participating in gymnastics than playing football.

Kind of makes sense I guess except for womens hockey. How the fark do so many get injured when they aren't even allowed to check?

Plus, women's hockey almost always means 'field hockey' and not 'ice hockey'.  Ice hockey I could maybe see being injury prone due to the skates, speeds involved, and the hard ice, but I'm with you, I'm not sure how so many women are becoming seriously injured playing field hockey.

Oh yeah forgot about that. But looking up ice hockey they still seem to have a much higher rate of injury including concussions.

I'm wondering if there is a higher incidence of reporting injury amongst female athletes than their male counterparts. Male athletes routinely keep what they consider to be nagging or minimal injuries like mild-moderate concussions and muscle pulls to themselves for fear of losing playing time or looking like a pussy. Especially in hockey where it's common practice to get stitched up and be back on the ice within minutes. I wonder if that's the difference.


Well this article goes into that a bit: "Stacey was skeptical of the idea that women tend to honestly report concussions while men tend to underreport. "From my experience that's a stereotype," he said. "I have players who will look at me straight in the eye and say they're fine when they are in fact experiencing symptoms."

But they also speculate it may have to do with not checking strangely enough "How is it that a sport that does not allow body checking should have such a high concussion rate? Mihalik said the phenomenon was still under study, but it may have to do with women not anticipating a hit. Studies in men's and boys' hockey show that the greatest risk of concussion occurs in unanticipated hits - and in women's hockey players may never anticipate a hit."

Interesting stuff

http://slapshot.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/10/19/at-the-mayo-clinic-wome ns -hockey-a-most-dangerous-game/
 
2013-10-30 07:19:23 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Shame Us: Tellingthem: TuteTibiImperes: Tellingthem: T

All other college sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 5.18, behind women's hockey (11.66), men's gymnastics (7.33) and men's hockey (6.25).

So, surprisingly enough, you have a greater chance of dying or being seriously injured playing hockey or participating in gymnastics than playing football.

Kind of makes sense I guess except for womens hockey. How the fark do so many get injured when they aren't even allowed to check?

Plus, women's hockey almost always means 'field hockey' and not 'ice hockey'.  Ice hockey I could maybe see being injury prone due to the skates, speeds involved, and the hard ice, but I'm with you, I'm not sure how so many women are becoming seriously injured playing field hockey.

Oh yeah forgot about that. But looking up ice hockey they still seem to have a much higher rate of injury including concussions.

I'm wondering if there is a higher incidence of reporting injury amongst female athletes than their male counterparts. Male athletes routinely keep what they consider to be nagging or minimal injuries like mild-moderate concussions and muscle pulls to themselves for fear of losing playing time or looking like a pussy. Especially in hockey where it's common practice to get stitched up and be back on the ice within minutes. I wonder if that's the difference.

Well, the stats said they tracked deaths and 'serious injuries'.  I'm not sure how 'serious injury' is defined, but I'd assume it wouldn't include things like scrapes, cuts, strained/pulled muscles, etc.


Interesting little blurb here with a small study of male vs. female college hockey teams in Canada. Basically it boiled down to a hypothesis that women would suffer a much lower injury rate than men because of the checking rules, but that the injury rates came out to be very similar. I guess just because you don't mean to hit anyone or anything out there doesn't mean you won't.
 
2013-10-30 07:20:24 PM
great minds, etc.
 
2013-10-30 07:21:03 PM
Five kids aged 16 or younger have died playing high school football since August, two from brain injuries and a third suffered a broken neck.

What did the other two die from?
 
2013-10-30 07:23:08 PM

ongbok: Five kids aged 16 or younger have died playing high school football since August, two from brain injuries and a third suffered a broken neck.

What did the other two die from?


Something only referred to in reports as "Last Boyscouting"
 
2013-10-30 07:23:35 PM

ongbok: Five kids aged 16 or younger have died playing high school football since August, two from brain injuries and a third suffered a broken neck.

What did the other two die from?


Probably some form of heat stroke/dehydration/shock, or heart issues, those are some of the more common causes of accidental death in athletes, likely not included because it didn't fit the narrative.
 
2013-10-30 07:26:56 PM

TuteTibiImperes: ongbok: Five kids aged 16 or younger have died playing high school football since August, two from brain injuries and a third suffered a broken neck.

What did the other two die from?

Probably some form of heat stroke/dehydration/shock, or heart issues, those are some of the more common causes of accidental death in athletes, likely not included because it didn't fit the narrative.


I was think that or lightning strike. Lightning is close to being a football players worst enemy in late August and September
 
2013-10-30 07:35:27 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Plus, women's hockey almost always means 'field hockey' and not 'ice hockey'. Ice hockey I could maybe see being injury prone due to the skates, speeds involved, and the hard ice, but I'm with you, I'm not sure how so many women are becoming seriously injured playing field hockey.



I can tell you haven't played or watched much (field) hockey. At most the players have football (soccer) style shin guards and maybe soft gloves playing with a ball as hard as concrete going at 80+mph and solid wooden sticks swing with enough force to propel a ball that fast. It all adds up to a game that when played by hyper competitive biatchy girls/women turns as ugly as almost any ice hockey game (minus the fights) but without any of the padding.
 
2013-10-30 07:36:28 PM
I see the NFL is still trying to pretend there is a safe way to play football.
 
2013-10-30 07:40:24 PM
TuteTibiImperes:

Comparing sports fatalities
Direct fatalities per 100,000 participants (measured from the 1982-83 academic year through 2002-03):

High school
Boys gymnastics 1.15

...serious injury rate (in) gymnastics (1.15).

College
Women's skiing 7.98

...serious injury rate (in) men's gymnastics (7.33)


Gravity is a harsh mistress referee.
 
2013-10-30 07:40:47 PM

truchaos: I bet when you figure the actual number of kids who play football versus the death rate, I bet it's higher then the per capita death rate from firearms.


You may have just invented the most interesting sport in the world.
 
2013-10-30 08:22:52 PM
My kid was a great high school/OVFL player who ended up having to quit football after 3 concussions. He was good enough at one position to maybe get a future look in the CFL and certainly a ride at college, but he ended up retired at 18 after being told that he was not allowed to play for 12 months then he could get re-evaluated to see if that visible (on CT scan) brain injury had healed up.

He only started playing at age 14, and was a fairly low mileage player due to shorter seasons/less prep time this side of the border. It makes me wonder what kind of brain injuries are not reported - his teams were very conscientious about getting kids with head injuries out of the game and keeping them out until fully healed. I also wonder even more what's happening with our hockey players since there are so very many kids playing youth hockey here, and at younger ages.

I don't see how Dr Oz and the NFL can teach proper tackling and pretend it's OK for kids to be tackling. Football is not safe and cannot be made safe at this time. I love the game, but over the long term, the price in physical terms is high.
 
2013-10-30 09:40:05 PM

Tellingthem: TuteTibiImperes: Tellingthem: T

All other college sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 5.18, behind women's hockey (11.66), men's gymnastics (7.33) and men's hockey (6.25).

So, surprisingly enough, you have a greater chance of dying or being seriously injured playing hockey or participating in gymnastics than playing football.

Kind of makes sense I guess except for womens hockey. How the fark do so many get injured when they aren't even allowed to check?

Plus, women's hockey almost always means 'field hockey' and not 'ice hockey'.  Ice hockey I could maybe see being injury prone due to the skates, speeds involved, and the hard ice, but I'm with you, I'm not sure how so many women are becoming seriously injured playing field hockey.

Oh yeah forgot about that. But looking up ice hockey they still seem to have a much higher rate of injury including concussions.


A big part of it is how muscle is distributed on men versus women.  With men, there tends to be significantly more muscle in the neck and around the knees, which helps protect against concussion and knee injuries.
 
2013-10-30 09:40:58 PM
It won't be long before one state's athletic association will ban tackle football under the high school level and will ban kick and punt returns at the high school level.
 
2013-10-30 09:48:37 PM

meanmutton: It won't be long before one state's athletic association will ban tackle football under the high school level


Teaching football to first graders is a bit of a farce anyway, isn't it? They can barely handle soccer.
 
2013-10-31 06:49:24 AM

truchaos: I bet when you figure the actual number of kids who play football versus the death rate, I bet it's higher then the per capita death rate from firearms.


Well, statistically, hunting and target shooting are safe sports for supervised youth - but it's important to remember that the injuries that do occur,  while less common, are generally more severe.
But the overall rate of firearms death among youth mostly consists of suicides and criminal homicides - not accidents that occur in the course of sport. Hard to compare.
 
2013-10-31 08:00:36 AM
Kids never used to get concussions playing football at nearly the rate they do now.

When they wore leather helmets, they would tackle each other by slaming into eachothers shoulders, Heads never collide.

Now days, football players just charge head first into the chest of the guy they're trying to knock down. It's surprising we don't have more shattered vertebrae in football to be honest.
 
2013-10-31 08:27:52 AM

Shame Us: I guess just because you don't mean to hit anyone or anything out there doesn't mean you won't.


I think this is a pretty accurate statement. I play two field sports-woman's Gaelic football and hurling (like a mix of lacrosse and field hockey). Even though the rules for girls say no shouldering, you wouldn't know it from watching games. There is plenty of incidental contact that can knock you down and cause concussions or other injuries.

Just because girls are supposed to play "politely" doesn't mean they aren't tough or aggressive on the field.
 
2013-10-31 11:55:39 AM

Tellingthem: TuteTibiImperes: Tellingthem: Triumph: FTA: More than 25,000 football players from 8 to 19 years old seek treatment for concussions at emergency rooms every year.

That's just concussions. I wonder what the total number of ER visits from football is.

Maybe have a breakdown of all sports. I suffered a few injuries from football and had to go to the hospital. But I also had to go from sledding too. So for me sledding was as dangerous as playing football. Knocked myself out once from playing tug o war (Rope broke and I went flying into a piano). Hell busted myself up pretty bad crashing on my bike. Honestly being a clumsy uncoordinated kid meant that almost everything I did I would end up hurt, I never injured myself playing with lawn darts though...

This is what I found after a quick Google:


Comparing sports fatalities
Direct fatalities per 100,000 participants (measured from the 1982-83 academic year through 2002-03):

High school
Boys gymnastics 1.15
Boys soccer 0.11
Baseball 0.08
Boys wrestling 0.04
Boys lacrosse 0.48
Boys basketball 0.02
Boys hockey 0.37
Softball 0.02
Football 0 .31
Girls track 0.01
Boys track 0.18

All other sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 0.73, third-highest below hockey (1.29) and gymnastics (1.15).

College
Women's skiing 7.98
Football 0.57
Men's lacrosse 1.79
Men's track 0.41
Baseball 0.63
Men's basketball 0.34

All other college sports had no deaths. Football had a serious injury rate of 5.18, behind women's hockey (11.66), men's gymnastics (7.33) and men's hockey (6.25).

So, surprisingly enough, you have a greater chance of dying or being seriously injured playing hockey or participating in gymnastics than playing football.

Kind of makes sense I guess except for womens hockey. How the fark do so many get injured when they aren't even allowed to check?


Crashes into the boards, which is also the main serious injury risk for men's hockey. Plus the fact they don't check means that when someone gets pissed and does nail someone, they don't know how to protect themselves because they aren't expecting it.
 
2013-10-31 02:11:05 PM

Evil Canadian: Football is not safe and cannot be made safe at this time.


For all those who feel this way: don't play or let your children play football.

Millions of young men (and lately young women) have played football for 80+ years.  I feel bad about your personal experiences, but don't try and shut down a sport that has been played for so long by so many because your loved one was hurt playing the game.

/Should we ban driving?  Many more youth are killed driving.
//Football is not evil
 
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