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(Fox News)   Boring: High school biology teacher teaches anaerobic respiration. Best class EVAR: By covering alcoholic fermentation via beer brewing. FARK: Extra credit for touring Coors   (foxnews.com ) divider line
    More: Cool, Arvada, EVAR, beer brewing  
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2021 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Oct 2013 at 10:18 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



40 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-10-30 10:18:55 AM  
*insert Breaking Bad reference
 
2013-10-30 10:19:53 AM  
I thought that said auto-erotic asphyxiation and wondered just how the hell thats boring
 
2013-10-30 10:20:35 AM  
You must have had boring science teachers to elicit this reaction. Every dork I know brews beer, it's not that cool to do.
 
2013-10-30 10:21:07 AM  
Parents always get upset when students learn useful life skills.
 
2013-10-30 10:21:34 AM  
This was all over the news here the other night. Some parents are just too uptight.

"I don't see any reason to teach a 15 year old the steps in brewing alcohol."

Because it is a fun and cool way to get kids interested in science?

I don't get it, we can legalize pot but don't teach kids how to brew beer! It isn't like they couldn't go online and figure it out anyway. It isn't terribly difficult.
 
2013-10-30 10:24:45 AM  
"Parents outraged at teacher using real-world scenarios to teach science, demands resignation."
 
2013-10-30 10:25:03 AM  
Can't wait for this to devolve into another beer snob thread.
"Ewww coors, it has like no hops bro!"
 
2013-10-30 10:25:14 AM  
Maude Flanders is the first complaint in 8 years and I love Colorado beer culture. That being said, I don't think it's appropriate in a high school.

Weed's legal here. I love weed. High school kids don't need to grow it in Biology class either.
 
2013-10-30 10:26:33 AM  
My faith was restored by reading the comments on the 9news now article.
 
2013-10-30 10:27:14 AM  
Did a really awesome tour of the Budweiser in Jacksonville during high school.  One of the high ups there was an old navy buddy of our science teacher.  Went through all their industrial works and processes.

Of course, I drink now as an adult:
i58.photobucket.com
i58.photobucket.com
 
2013-10-30 10:31:09 AM  

bopis: Can't wait for this to devolve into another beer snob thread.
"Ewww coors, it has like no hops bro!"


Mmm give me beer where something went wrong.  I love me some American Wild Ale beers.
 
2013-10-30 10:35:51 AM  
Hoorrayy, beer!

csb...When I was in 9th grade, we were told to come up with a science project. My buddy and I, half-jokingly, told the teacher we would make moonshine. The teacher laughed, and said okay. He figured we would screw something up, and simply report on how it didn't work.

We worked very dilligently on this particular project--I researched at the library, and found instructions on how to make moonshine, step by step. I built the still, and my friend made sour mash. A few days later, we set up a coleman camp stove, and managed to distill about a half pint of moonshine. We wrote our report and took the moonshine to school.

The teacher was shocked that we had succeeded. He ran to the principal, who was a burly man from Eastern KY, who checked out our product. To "verify" the authenticity, they grabbed an old janitor, whose family was involved in actual moonshine production in the mountains; he verified that we had made actual moonshine.

The teacher, principal, and janitor came into the class room, giddy. They seemed to think it was awesome that two 9th graders made whisky. We got an A+ on the project.

That was 25 years ago. I feel that if that same scenario were replayed today, the students would be expelled and locked up, the ATF would raid the school and homes, and the parents would be thrown in prison.
 
2013-10-30 10:43:22 AM  
No doubt, beezeltown. "Zero tolerance" has turned everyone into no-responsibility, just-following-orders fascists.
 
2013-10-30 10:51:20 AM  
My chem teacher taught the same way.  He demonstrated limiting reactions by fermenting molasses in one container (CO2 is released, allowing the production of alcohol), while fermenting sugar in sealed bottles (CO2 is retained, preventing alcohol formation).  Of course, the next section covered evaporation, condensation, and partial pressures so naturally he distilled the fermented molasses.

So we spent two chapters making rum and root beer.
 
2013-10-30 10:58:15 AM  
"I don't see any reason to teach a 15 year old the steps in brewing alcohol."

Well who asked you?
 
2013-10-30 11:05:53 AM  
Extra credit for touring Coors

To discover how to do it without imparting any taste to the water.
 
2013-10-30 11:13:11 AM  
It's part of science and is a common product.  You know what else they teach in biology? Evolution and sex, deal with it.  God forbid they take chemistry and learn how to blow shiat up or make drugs.  Don't get started on shop.  Ninja stars in the ceiling.

As long as they are not drinking the product.  Hey, this is Colorado we are talking about.  They could just grow some pot.
 
2013-10-30 11:31:26 AM  
Of course, Coors beer is swill, but touring the plant would still be a pretty cool lesson on where you can go with SCIENCE!
 
2013-10-30 11:38:34 AM  
FTFA:  'You cannot buy alcohol until you're 21,'" Moerz said. "I don't see any reason to teach a 15 year old the steps in brewing alcohol."

14-year-old kids can't vote, but we teach them about voting.
 
2013-10-30 11:44:47 AM  
In my HS freshman year science class (1988), we fermented and distilled what was essentially moonshine using water, molasses, and yeast.
 
2013-10-30 11:57:15 AM  
Fermentation is WAY easier to teach using real world examples like yogurt and beer.

That being said, fermentation and anaerobic respiration are different.  They are the same idea (getting ATP anaerobically), but using different mechanisms.  Anaerobic respiration uses non-O2 electron acceptors in a respiratory chain for the purposes of oxidative phosphorylation.   Fermentation involves the oxidation NADH so that glycolysis can continue providing ATP through substrate level phosphorylation.
 
2013-10-30 11:57:50 AM  
Had I known the chemistry involved in brewing beer, I would have paid a hell of a lot more attention in chemistry class back in high school. I fully approve of high schoolers being taught this.
 
2013-10-30 12:08:29 PM  
On their insider-tours, Coors used to have a garden spigot off a keg line deep down in the brewery where you could get it as fresh as can be.

Still tasted like Coors
 
2013-10-30 12:24:47 PM  
In my grade 9 the science teacher secretly replaced all the rubbing alcohol stored in the chemical room with Vodka and drank some every chance he got.  FARK: My Science class was at 9am.
 
2013-10-30 12:25:55 PM  

Uranus Is Huge!: Maude Flanders is the first complaint in 8 years and I love Colorado beer culture. That being said, I don't think it's appropriate in a high school.

Weed's legal here. I love weed. High school kids don't need to grow it in Biology class either.


You do realize that at 14 they can get working papers and actually work at a brewery, right?

/fun fact, at 9 in CO you can legally work shining shoes
 
2013-10-30 12:29:57 PM  
Fish in a Barrel
My chem teacher taught the same way. He demonstrated limiting reactions by fermenting molasses in one container (CO2 is released, allowing the production of alcohol), while fermenting sugar in sealed bottles (CO2 is retained, preventing alcohol formation). Of course, the next section covered evaporation, condensation, and partial pressures so naturally he distilled the fermented molasses.

So we spent two chapters making rum and root beer.


CSB:

Reminds me a bit of my first advanced chemistry lesson in 12th grade.
There were so few students in my year who were taking that class, that the school had decided to merge us with the year above ours (*).
Those older students had a couple of student presentations that they couldn't fit in at the end of the previous term, so our first "combined" class consisted of us having to sit through two or three left-over presentations by the older students.
As an intro to the upcoming organic chem, the final left-over presentation was one about alcohols.
The two guys finished their presentation with "We also prepared a student experiment", followed by one of them popping open the briefcase on the table in front of them and pulling out a stack of paper cups and a few bottles of sparkling wine.

So we started into that year with bubblies and cakes(**).


(*)
kinda worked out because semester 1&2 were anorganic and year 3&4 were organic chem and because you take your final exams in the middle of semester #4, so the older students were asked to explain the necessary bits from the previous year to us as a means of repetition/preparation for their exams.

(**)
The cakes had been brought by others students as a penance for stuff from the previous semester:
In some year 12 and 13 classes, it was a custom for students to earn "cake marks" for being late.
Three marks meant you had to bring a self-baked cake.
In advanced chem class, our teacher had extended the use of cake marks for stuff like not wearing safety goggles, for getting the best and the worst grade in written tests, or, in preparation for the final exams, for not using proper chemistry terms and language when answering questions (e.g. one girl calling the dz2 orbital "that cutsy pacifier one" had caught on).
So we had lots of cakes:even our chem class' graduation yearbook page consisted d the obligatory class picture, the school's safety regulations prohibiting eating and drinking in the chem rooms and cake recipes in form of experiment instructions.
One student even managed to earn three cake marks at once for pissing off the teacher with whatever he said after arriving 40 minutes late for our first 45-minute period of the day:
"You get one for being late, obviously. One for that lame and cheeky excuse. And one for sheer stupidity!
Because had you waited five more minutes, you wouldn't have been late at all and gotten away with writing an excusatory note for missing first period."
 
2013-10-30 12:50:12 PM  
My brother brewed beer for his chemistry or biology class when he was in high school. This was groovy California in the late 1970's, and all of our teachers were old hippies. Well, I thought they were old at the time. Now I'm older than most of them were at the time. Old.

Beer.
 
2013-10-30 12:51:44 PM  
Beer also undergoes aerobic fermenation, too.

TMYK
 
2013-10-30 12:52:20 PM  
As someone in the middle of opening a brewery, I'm getting a kick, etc...
 
2013-10-30 01:25:48 PM  

seek3r: Uranus Is Huge!: Maude Flanders is the first complaint in 8 years and I love Colorado beer culture. That being said, I don't think it's appropriate in a high school.

Weed's legal here. I love weed. High school kids don't need to grow it in Biology class either.

You do realize that at 14 they can get working papers and actually work at a brewery, right?

/fun fact, at 9 in CO you can legally work shining shoes


Many people aren't able to distinguish between 'can' and 'should'.
 
2013-10-30 01:36:01 PM  

jst3p: It isn't like they couldn't go online and figure it out anyway. It isn't terribly difficult.


My first instruction was from my father, who had broken his collar bone, enlisting me to just follow his command. I was allowed to have one of the beers when it was ready as payment. I was 12. Nobody was harmed by the process.

Teaching your 15 year old son what beer should be like, instead of the 15 year old just getting the cheapest high percentage piss = good effing parenting.
 
2013-10-30 01:37:35 PM  

Fantasta Potamus: "Parents outraged at teacher using real-world scenarios to teaching science, demands resignation."


FTFY

In freshman biology we learned about fermentation by putting yeast in cranberry juice and drinking the results later in the semester.  Somehow we survived without (too many of us) turning into alcoholics.
 
2013-10-30 02:28:24 PM  

GoodOmens: My faith was restored by reading the comments on the 9news now article.


Those Ralston High School students are...articulate.  Whoa.
 
2013-10-30 03:27:55 PM  

Uranus Is Huge!: seek3r: Uranus Is Huge!: Maude Flanders is the first complaint in 8 years and I love Colorado beer culture. That being said, I don't think it's appropriate in a high school.

Weed's legal here. I love weed. High school kids don't need to grow it in Biology class either.

You do realize that at 14 they can get working papers and actually work at a brewery, right?

/fun fact, at 9 in CO you can legally work shining shoes

Many people aren't able to distinguish between 'can' and 'should'.


Let me ask you something, should they be allowed to learn about or make combustibles in chemistry? Should they be allowed to have sex ed?

Discussing a subject and learning how it works doesn't mean endorsing it's unconditional use, and if you force people to wait until they're 18 to learn everything they're going to make poor life choices and have a hard time in college and/or finding a job.

The teacher isn't calling a kegger and saying "now's when you chug", the teacher is showing how normal and needed biological process has real world industrial uses and in the process making the subject cool instead of boring. If we're talking the absolutely minuscule risk that some kid that magically wouldn't have drank in HS will suddenly now do so because of this class vs the rather good odds it will end up interesting someone who had eschewed STEM into actually being interested... well I know which side I'm on.
 
2013-10-30 04:10:05 PM  
I wanted to learn more about the story but the website is down.
 
2013-10-30 04:25:19 PM  

seek3r: Uranus Is Huge!: seek3r: Uranus Is Huge!: Maude Flanders is the first complaint in 8 years and I love Colorado beer culture. That being said, I don't think it's appropriate in a high school.

Weed's legal here. I love weed. High school kids don't need to grow it in Biology class either.

You do realize that at 14 they can get working papers and actually work at a brewery, right?

/fun fact, at 9 in CO you can legally work shining shoes

Many people aren't able to distinguish between 'can' and 'should'.

Let me ask you something, should they be allowed to learn about or make combustibles in chemistry? Should they be allowed to have sex ed?

Discussing a subject and learning how it works doesn't mean endorsing it's unconditional use, and if you force people to wait until they're 18 to learn everything they're going to make poor life choices and have a hard time in college and/or finding a job.

The teacher isn't calling a kegger and saying "now's when you chug", the teacher is showing how normal and needed biological process has real world industrial uses and in the process making the subject cool instead of boring. If we're talking the absolutely minuscule risk that some kid that magically wouldn't have drank in HS will suddenly now do so because of this class vs the rather good odds it will end up interesting someone who had eschewed STEM into actually being interested... well I know which side I'm on.


No. High school kids don't need to make beer or explosives to learn chemistry.

Look, I don't think this is a huge deal. I just don't think it's a great idea.

Sex ed is a health/safety issue. Brewing beer in science class is not alcohol awareness.

That you disagree doesn't really impact my opinion.
 
2013-10-30 07:24:25 PM  
I'm actually bottling this year's batch of hard cider tomorrow, so I'm really getting a kick out of these replies.
 
2013-10-30 09:20:41 PM  
Um, no the School of Fark should take points off for Coors.
 
2013-10-31 12:15:17 AM  
My 9th grade science teacher taught us all about the fermentation process - but only to prove that beer is made from yeast piss, so we'd think it's gross.
 
2013-10-31 10:31:37 AM  

serial_crusher: Um, no the School of Fark should take points off for Coors.


Microbreweries would love to have the level of process control that Coors does.  Myself included.
 
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