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(Salon)   Why does America listen to Jenny McCarthy and Suzanne Somers' scientific opinions instead of, you know, the opinions of scientists?   (salon.com) divider line 171
    More: Sad, Jenny McCarty, Mary Steenburgen, Dr. Oz, outbreaks, Jenny McCarthy, causes of autism, traditional medicine, fuddyduddies  
•       •       •

6521 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Oct 2013 at 10:22 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-30 11:00:30 AM  

DO NOT WANT Poster Girl: Bendal: People like Limbaugh and Somers and McCarthy talk like everyone else; that makes them more believable to the uneducated than the experts using big science words that make them sound like eggheads and know-it-alls.

Some of us scientists can talk like everyone else. We're just not as photogenic.


And some of can talk like everyone else, are photogenic and just have nonexistant video editing skills.

http://www.centerforcommunicatingscience.org/the-flame-challenge-2/m ee t-the-finalists/
 
2013-10-30 11:08:48 AM  

SamFlagg: Why do people believe in snake oil?  Because they want snake oil to work, it is something real and tangible right here right now that I can acquire with minimal effort.

Because I want these things to be true, I therefore force myself to believe those things to be true.

People have an incredible aversion to being wrong about anything at anytime once they've settled on what right is.  (Partially because the first thing they expect to happen when they admit they were wrong is everyone and their uncle come and spike the football in their face and do a touchdown dance and call them stupid for every believing X in this first place, but that idea gets internalized so they have their own version of themselves prepared to do such if nobody does it to them.)

It's not just an American thing, it's a human thing.  We prefer to believe that we know best in all matters, and also like to think that each of us has our own special circumstance that makes the normal rules not apply to us, because dealing with the fact that most of us are relatively mundane and uninteresting is something of a terrifying thought.


That, plus the sheer amount of time and effort as well as ill will generated in friends and family members. They've invested too much time and effort and sometimes at great personal cost to be wrong. I've always said this type of pseudo science is often latched onto by people with lives so sheltered and devoid of any kind of defining struggle that they seek them out.

I have an uncle like this. Nice guy, incredibly smart, follows science and reason in almost all things but don't get him started on vaccines because the conversation train takes a quick detour into crazytown. His "science", from sources like gaia-health.com and greatergoodmovie.com, is solid, whereas anything posted in a journal debunking his beliefs are just part of the conspiracy Big Pharma is perpetrating on us...and on and on and on. He can't be wrong about this, he won't be wrong, because the alternative is that he's an irresponsible parent who put his children in danger, so he stays in the rabbit hole.
 
2013-10-30 11:09:04 AM  
Have you seen the candidates running for the top offices in Virginia?

I would say the average american is a mouth breathing moran, because that number wouldn't be high enough.
 
Bf+
2013-10-30 11:11:12 AM  
www.mediabistro.com
 
2013-10-30 11:16:18 AM  
Because Jesus, that's why subby. I will pray for you.
 
2013-10-30 11:28:50 AM  
d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net
 
2013-10-30 11:52:55 AM  

Flab: Because of Boobies?

(No Fark filters were tripped in the making of this post)


Done in one. They grant the bearer magical powers of attention whoring.
 
2013-10-30 01:25:42 PM  

farkingismybusiness: Probably because of the same reason that she convinced me that mustard on a hot dog is awesome.
[guymeetsworld.files.wordpress.com image 480x580]


Were there words on that cover?
 
2013-10-30 01:32:59 PM  

TheBlackFlag: There should be a special circle of hell reserved for that boob, Jenny McCarthy.

First she self-diagnoses her son as having autism, which she then blames on vaccinations based on nothing.

Then she shouts it from the rooftops until it becomes a meme and thousands stop vaccinating their children as a result, putting everyone at risk.

Finally she comes clean and admits that, yea, my kid never had autism in the first place. But she does it quietly and with none of the fire and brimstone of her original bullsiat claim leaving many dumb and uniformed still afraid to vaccinate their kids, STILL putting so many at genuine risk.

I dont know what is more pathetic, her, or the idiots that followed her advice.



Wait - when did that part happen? You have a link? or suggested Google search terms?
 
2013-10-30 01:36:23 PM  

xalres: That, plus the sheer amount of time and effort as well as ill will generated in friends and family members. They've invested too much time and effort and sometimes at great personal cost to be wrong. I've always said this type of pseudo science is often latched onto by people with lives so sheltered and devoid of any kind of defining struggle that they seek them out.

I have an uncle like this. Nice guy, incredibly smart, follows science and reason in almost all things but don't get him started on vaccines because the conversation train takes a quick detour into crazytown. His "science", from sources like gaia-health.com and greatergoodmovie.com, is solid, whereas anything posted in a journal debunking his beliefs are just part of the conspiracy Big Pharma is perpetrating on us...and on and on and on. He can't be wrong about this, he won't be wrong, because the alternative is that he's an irresponsible parent who put his children in danger, so he stays in the rabbit hole.


I think the best approach to take in this kind of situation is to acknowledge as much as you can of their point, then demonstrate the benefits and safety of different behavior in the future.

For example:

- Yes, mercury is really bad stuff, and very small amounts of it can cause brain development issues in fetuses and young children.

- Almost no vaccines use Themerisol anymore (the multi-dose flu shot is an exception), so you can easily avoid vaccines with any mercury in them.

- The tiny tiny amount of mercury in a multi-dose flu shot means you would have to get 120+ shots every day to start seeing even the beginning symptoms of mercury poisoning.

- Your kids are safe, they didn't get autism or an dangerous diseases, and now that they are older it's a good idea to consider vaccinating them with the safe and effective vaccines that are available.

Good luck!
 
2013-10-30 01:40:47 PM  

Ctrl-Alt-Del: TheBlackFlag: There should be a special circle of hell reserved for that boob, Jenny McCarthy.

First she self-diagnoses her son as having autism, which she then blames on vaccinations based on nothing.

Then she shouts it from the rooftops until it becomes a meme and thousands stop vaccinating their children as a result, putting everyone at risk.

Finally she comes clean and admits that, yea, my kid never had autism in the first place. But she does it quietly and with none of the fire and brimstone of her original bullsiat claim leaving many dumb and uniformed still afraid to vaccinate their kids, STILL putting so many at genuine risk.

I dont know what is more pathetic, her, or the idiots that followed her advice.


Wait - when did that part happen? You have a link? or suggested Google search terms?


Google tells me that she's still a dangerous anti-scientific loon:

McCarthy was interviewed for an article in Time Magazine which asserts that her son Evan actually suffers from a rare condition called Landau-Kleffner syndrome.  The biggest proof of this is that Evan has gotten better, when in reality there is no cure for autism.

McCarthy's son is now able to talk, make eye contact, and maintain friendships, all things which he was initially unable to do.  His early behavior is what led to the early diagnosis of autism, but the recent reversal in his symptoms points to a different cause...

 McCarthy is still not publicly admitting that her son never had autism.  She prefers instead to put forth the idea that she cured him of his autism.  Surely this can't be because she has founded an organization dedicated to "curing autism," and is the wildly popular author of three books about how you can cure your child's autism?
 
2013-10-30 02:03:26 PM  
Well at least Chrissy's boobies are real.
 
2013-10-30 02:52:26 PM  

Zasteva: xalres: That, plus the sheer amount of time and effort as well as ill will generated in friends and family members. They've invested too much time and effort and sometimes at great personal cost to be wrong. I've always said this type of pseudo science is often latched onto by people with lives so sheltered and devoid of any kind of defining struggle that they seek them out.

I have an uncle like this. Nice guy, incredibly smart, follows science and reason in almost all things but don't get him started on vaccines because the conversation train takes a quick detour into crazytown. His "science", from sources like gaia-health.com and greatergoodmovie.com, is solid, whereas anything posted in a journal debunking his beliefs are just part of the conspiracy Big Pharma is perpetrating on us...and on and on and on. He can't be wrong about this, he won't be wrong, because the alternative is that he's an irresponsible parent who put his children in danger, so he stays in the rabbit hole.

I think the best approach to take in this kind of situation is to acknowledge as much as you can of their point, then demonstrate the benefits and safety of different behavior in the future.

For example:

- Yes, mercury is really bad stuff, and very small amounts of it can cause brain development issues in fetuses and young children.

- Almost no vaccines use Themerisol anymore (the multi-dose flu shot is an exception), so you can easily avoid vaccines with any mercury in them.

- The tiny tiny amount of mercury in a multi-dose flu shot means you would have to get 120+ shots every day to start seeing even the beginning symptoms of mercury poisoning.

- Your kids are safe, they didn't get autism or an dangerous diseases, and now that they are older it's a good idea to consider vaccinating them with the safe and effective vaccines that are available.

Good luck!


A few in my family have tried. He's just too far gone. He's convinced the pertussis outbreaks in heavily anti-vaxx areas are caused by the vaccine...it's bordering on mental illness. Right now we're at "agree to disagree" on this subject so we just don't talk about it but if something happens to my cousins I don't think I'll be able to keep from tearing him a new arsehole. Of all the asinine things to latch onto he picked the irresponsible and dangerous one.
 
2013-10-30 03:43:35 PM  

Mad_Radhu: [img.fark.net image 425x355]

I dunno. You really can't trust the rain to get all the blood off, and dried blood is pretty obvious even on a red car.


I'm concerned that I had the same thought.
 
2013-10-30 05:01:52 PM  

Phil Clinton: And isn't it illegal to give medical advice to people if you're not a doctor? I remember hearing that a while ago and then google confirmed it was. It was a few years back though.


Specific medical advise based on a patient's history or trying to make a diagnosis, yes.
General health info, not really.
 
2013-10-30 06:13:35 PM  
We should put all these vapid twunts into an area and force them to fight each other to the death... And then ship the winner to Antarctica.
 
2013-10-30 07:24:12 PM  

Phil Clinton: And isn't it illegal to give medical advice to people if you're not a doctor?  I remember hearing that a while ago and then google confirmed it was.  It was a few years back though.


I would think it would be as illegal as dipensing legal advice, but don't take my word for it.
 
2013-10-31 12:35:55 AM  

ZeroCorpse: hubiestubert: I have an easy method to help remedy this, but it will take a few generations, and some concerted effort on all our parts, and that it is voiced by John Waters, should give it the weight that a celebrity crazed public can understand:

'If you go home with somebody, and they don't have books, don't f*ck 'em!'

Seriously, folks. You have the power. Ladies, that goes double for y'all.

It's an outdated idea... I don't have many paper books left. I don't have room for them, and I've converted to digital in the past few years...  So my bookshelf isn't exactly visible to visitors.

Meanwhile, speaking as a former bookseller, I am absolutely certain that many people buy books with no intention of ever reading them; They are, instead, part of the decor. Every time Oprah endorsed a book we sold a ton of them, and from conversing with my customers I can tell you that maybe 20% of the books sold were ever cracked open. The rest were coffee table decor, or placed in a bookshelf to make people think the homeowner was well-informed and up on the latest trends.

We had people who would come in and buy several best-sellers each month, and in later encounters with them it was clear they never read the books they bought; They were just for show.

So the entire practice of judging a person with a large library or bookshelf as "intellectual" is flawed from the beginning. OWNING books doesn't necessarily prove you actually READ books, and a lack of visible books does not indicate that someone is a non-reader.


Yeah, and besides, I'd hope by the time someone comes home with me (or vice-versa), I'd have a grasp on whether they're reasonably intelligent and well-read or not.
 
2013-10-31 02:54:57 AM  

Bukharin: [d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net image 304x475]


Great book. I read it 20 years ago while doing research for a college paper on cultural shift from people relying on the clergy for advice to relying on whoever the media chose to put forward as "experts".
 
2013-10-31 06:33:18 AM  

Ctrl-Alt-Del: Ctrl-Alt-Del: TheBlackFlag: There should be a special circle of hell reserved for that boob, Jenny McCarthy.

First she self-diagnoses her son as having autism, which she then blames on vaccinations based on nothing.

Then she shouts it from the rooftops until it becomes a meme and thousands stop vaccinating their children as a result, putting everyone at risk.

Finally she comes clean and admits that, yea, my kid never had autism in the first place. But she does it quietly and with none of the fire and brimstone of her original bullsiat claim leaving many dumb and uniformed still afraid to vaccinate their kids, STILL putting so many at genuine risk.

I dont know what is more pathetic, her, or the idiots that followed her advice.


Wait - when did that part happen? You have a link? or suggested Google search terms?

Google tells me that she's still a dangerous anti-scientific loon:

McCarthy was interviewed for an article in Time Magazine which asserts that her son Evan actually suffers from a rare condition called Landau-Kleffner syndrome.  The biggest proof of this is that Evan has gotten better, when in reality there is no cure for autism.

McCarthy's son is now able to talk, make eye contact, and maintain friendships, all things which he was initially unable to do.  His early behavior is what led to the early diagnosis of autism, but the recent reversal in his symptoms points to a different cause...

 McCarthy is still not publicly admitting that her son never had autism.  She prefers instead to put forth the idea that she cured him of his autism.  Surely this can't be because she has founded an organization dedicated to "curing autism," and is the wildly popular author of three books about how you can cure your child's autism?



Man, didn't know all this.  My 'respect' for her has moved from -12390.234 points to -234987230498972347892374 points.

JFC, what a despicable , evil coont.
 
2013-10-31 08:10:08 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: WhyteRaven74: Harry_Seldon: I wouldn't ask him how to improve the appearance of my thighs...or would i?

[img.fark.net image 850x566]

He actually knows a bit about that

/yes that's him

There's a reason the whole 'Badass' meme got associated with him:

[www.geekquality.com image 400x608]

The Doc's got some guns on him.


Seriously, that's pretty awesome.
 
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