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(BBC)   In 1996, a teenage black girl saved the life of a fat white redneck from a mob trying to kill his Nazi ass   (bbc.co.uk ) divider line
    More: Hero, Nazis, tattoos, Ku Klux Klan  
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14382 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Oct 2013 at 3:48 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-29 04:19:44 PM  

raanne: I remember this. I was in High School. In Ann Arbor. This was really big news 17 years ago. Why are we talking about it now?


Because some stories of courage and decency are inspiring enough to be re-told?


FTA:But Thomas, now in her 30s and living in Houston, Texas, does not. She prefers to concentrate on what more she can do in future, rather than what she has achieved in the past.
"I don't want to think that this is the best I could ever be. In life you are always striving to do better."


And maybe because it looks like she continues to humbly be a good person.

/thanks subby
 
2013-10-29 04:20:42 PM  

Dubya's_Coke_Dealer: Why don't these rednecks racists ever fly the REAL Confederate flag?


www.telecoms.com
 
2013-10-29 04:23:00 PM  
Ain't that America. . .
 
2013-10-29 04:23:04 PM  

Kid Shelleen: Playing Devil's Advocate, perhaps he was repentant and wanted to stand with the protestors as an act of bravery against "his kind." I'd truly like to know more about him. He was, after all, apparently standing peacefully with the protestors, not marching with the bad guys.


Maybe, but that would at least still leave him a complete moron. You'd think somebody "repentant" would be smart enough to not only cover the tattoo, but to also not intentionally wear a t-shirt with such negative racial connotations to a rally full of racists.

I mean, what, it was laundry day and the guy just didn't have any other shirts?
 
2013-10-29 04:23:08 PM  

mutterfark: Because some stories of courage and decency are inspiring enough to be re-told?


I don't disagree. I just literally meant what was the reason for retelling this specific story? I remember it well, it got a lot of press. I was just wondering if there was something related that caused it to pop back up. No arguments that its a great story worth retelling from me though.
 
2013-10-29 04:24:34 PM  
"She put herself at physical risk to protect someone who, in my opinion, would not have done the same for her," he says. "Who does that in this world?"


That's one hell of an assumption you've got there. You have no idea how this man would've reacted, had the roles been reversed. For all you know, he might've done the exact same thing. That said, it was nice of her to save Andy Ried, like that.  Chief's fans everywhere would like to thank you...
 
2013-10-29 04:25:14 PM  
ongbok:
Kid Shelleen: macadamnut: It was unclear whether the man was a Ku Klux Klan supporter, but to the anti-KKK protesters, his clothes and tattoos represented exactly what they had come to resist. The Confederate flag he wore was for them a symbol of hatred and racism, while the SS tattoo on his arm pointed to a belief in white supremacy, or worse.

What was unclear about it?

Playing Devil's Advocate, perhaps he was repentant and wanted to stand with the protestors as an act of bravery against "his kind."  I'd truly like to know more about him.  He was, after all, apparently standing peacefully with the protestors, not marching with the bad guys.

He was being a troll and got his ass kicked by a bunch of people who were tired of these racist assholes. In the 90's the Klan was known for holding rallies in cities where they knew they wouldn't be accepted and sending one of their more ignorant members out into the crowd to get a violent reaction from the crowd. They did this in several cities in the 90's, and there was even a Nightline segment about one of their rallies were one of their members that was sent out into the crowd to troll got his ass kicked, and after the other Klan members were watching the tape of it high fiveing and congratulating each other that they got the crowd to act violently.


OK, I can see that,  I remember Skokie, as well, and that was the '70s.  Still, I'd like to know more about him.  Did this affect his outlook?  Was his assumed racism solidified by the mob attacking him or did he see the light thanks to the nice woman in the article?  Even bigots can be capable of introspection.
 
2013-10-29 04:27:12 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: "She put herself at physical risk to protect someone who, in my opinion, would not have done the same for her," he says. "Who does that in this world?"


That's one hell of an assumption you've got there. You have no idea how this man would've reacted, had the roles been reversed. For all you know, he might've done the exact same thing. That said, it was nice of her to save Andy Ried, like that.  Chief's fans everywhere would like to thank you...


For some reason I don't think a person who thinks Black people should be property and aren't equal to him would risk his own safety to save a black woman that was being beaten by a mob of people that thought like him. Call me crazy, but I don't think it would happen
 
2013-10-29 04:27:36 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: "She put herself at physical risk to protect someone who, in my opinion, would not have done the same for her," he says. "Who does that in this world?"

That's one hell of an assumption you've got there. You have no idea how this man would've reacted, had the roles been reversed. For all you know, he might've done the exact same thing. That said, it was nice of her to save Andy Ried, like that.  Chief's fans everywhere would like to thank you...


Considering he was at a rally to demonstrate his hate for blacks, Jews, etc. and he never even thanked her for saving him, the assumption seems to be a good one. If he can't say thank you, what makes you think he'd go into harm's way to help her?
 
2013-10-29 04:28:50 PM  

ongbok: He was being a troll and got his ass kicked by a bunch of people who were tired of these racist assholes. In the 90's the Klan was known for holding rallies in cities where they knew they wouldn't be accepted and sending one of their more ignorant members out into the crowd to get a violent reaction from the crowd. They did this in several cities in the 90's, and there was even a Nightline segment about one of their rallies were one of their members that was sent out into the crowd to troll got his ass kicked, and after the other Klan members were watching the tape of it high fiveing and congratulating each other that they got the crowd to act violently.


Still, in some degree he proved them guilty of the exact same behavior of prejudging other based on their appearance.

He still deserved his ass whipped for being a troll, I'm just saying he got what he wanted
 
2013-10-29 04:28:58 PM  

raanne: mutterfark: Because some stories of courage and decency are inspiring enough to be re-told?

I don't disagree. I just literally meant what was the reason for retelling this specific story? I remember it well, it got a lot of press. I was just wondering if there was something related that caused it to pop back up. No arguments that its a great story worth retelling from me though.


Dunno.  It was in the BBC Features and Analysis section on my phone, which is usually where all the stories I want to read end up.   Maybe the person who kept the picture for 17 years contacted the BBC, maybe someone stumbled across the photo and decided to do a what happened after story, (shrug).

But I live here now, and I didn't in 96, and it was a great story to read.  Something to keep in mind if I ever get put into a situation like that.  I'd hope I wouldn't go with Angry Mob.
 
2013-10-29 04:29:34 PM  
img.fark.net

Am I the only one that thinks something looks a little "off", in this picture? It looks like it's staged, or something. It looks like the redneck guy is trying to look like he's running, but the people behind him don't look like they're chasing someone. Maybe it's just me, but it looks odd, for some reason.
 
2013-10-29 04:29:55 PM  

skozlaw: Kid Shelleen: Playing Devil's Advocate, perhaps he was repentant and wanted to stand with the protestors as an act of bravery against "his kind." I'd truly like to know more about him. He was, after all, apparently standing peacefully with the protestors, not marching with the bad guys.

Maybe, but that would at least still leave him a complete moron. You'd think somebody "repentant" would be smart enough to not only cover the tattoo, but to also not intentionally wear a t-shirt with such negative racial connotations to a rally full of racists.

I mean, what, it was laundry day and the guy just didn't have any other shirts?


Well, the point is, I don't know.  I'm not trying to be obtuse - he probably at least was a racist and Nazi, but people are complicated.  And I'm curious.
 
2013-10-29 04:30:35 PM  
And really we do still live in a world where there is rampant racism and judgement all the way around our culture. Why hell even at places like Hooters they still make the black waitresses wear the same stockings, and I realize this is bad but some part of my inner self likes that because when they bring me food it takes me back to owning land and people.
 
2013-10-29 04:31:12 PM  

Kid Shelleen: ongbok:
Kid Shelleen: macadamnut: It was unclear whether the man was a Ku Klux Klan supporter, but to the anti-KKK protesters, his clothes and tattoos represented exactly what they had come to resist. The Confederate flag he wore was for them a symbol of hatred and racism, while the SS tattoo on his arm pointed to a belief in white supremacy, or worse.

What was unclear about it?

Playing Devil's Advocate, perhaps he was repentant and wanted to stand with the protestors as an act of bravery against "his kind."  I'd truly like to know more about him.  He was, after all, apparently standing peacefully with the protestors, not marching with the bad guys.

He was being a troll and got his ass kicked by a bunch of people who were tired of these racist assholes. In the 90's the Klan was known for holding rallies in cities where they knew they wouldn't be accepted and sending one of their more ignorant members out into the crowd to get a violent reaction from the crowd. They did this in several cities in the 90's, and there was even a Nightline segment about one of their rallies were one of their members that was sent out into the crowd to troll got his ass kicked, and after the other Klan members were watching the tape of it high fiveing and congratulating each other that they got the crowd to act violently.

OK, I can see that,  I remember Skokie, as well, and that was the '70s.  Still, I'd like to know more about him.  Did this affect his outlook?  Was his assumed racism solidified by the mob attacking him or did he see the light thanks to the nice woman in the article?  Even bigots can be capable of introspection.


If he was dumb enough to go into that crowd wearing that stuff, blatantly throwing racism in their faces knowing he was probably going to take a bad beating, then he wasn't smart enough to change his ways. Think about it, he was the one that was so farking dumb that the rest of the group felt that he could be sacrificed and thought nothing of it. Hell this guy probably would say he was doing his part to get the race war started.
 
2013-10-29 04:31:15 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: Am I the only one that thinks something looks a little "off", in this picture? It looks like it's staged, or something. It looks like the redneck guy is trying to look like he's running, but the people behind him don't look like they're chasing someone. Maybe it's just me, but it looks odd, for some reason.


Fat people are like tractors, they take time to build up the needed torque before getting into gear
 
2013-10-29 04:37:59 PM  

ongbok: Sin_City_Superhero: "She put herself at physical risk to protect someone who, in my opinion, would not have done the same for her," he says. "Who does that in this world?"


That's one hell of an assumption you've got there. You have no idea how this man would've reacted, had the roles been reversed. For all you know, he might've done the exact same thing. That said, it was nice of her to save Andy Ried, like that.  Chief's fans everywhere would like to thank you...

For some reason I don't think a person who thinks Black people should be property and aren't equal to him would risk his own safety to save a black woman that was being beaten by a mob of people that thought like him. Call me crazy, but I don't think it would happen


sweetmelissa31: Considering he was at a rally to demonstrate his hate for blacks, Jews, etc. and he never even thanked her for saving him, the assumption seems to be a good one. If he can't say thank you, what makes you think he'd go into harm's way to help her?


Well, she was at a rally to protest against what this guy stood for, and she did the right thing any way. It is possible that, given a reversal of roles, he would've done the same thing.
 
2013-10-29 04:39:17 PM  

raanne: mutterfark: Because some stories of courage and decency are inspiring enough to be re-told?

I don't disagree. I just literally meant what was the reason for retelling this specific story? I remember it well, it got a lot of press. I was just wondering if there was something related that caused it to pop back up. No arguments that its a great story worth retelling from me though.


Ah, I should have just said I hadn't heard the story before without the "snark". Oh well, that's one of the reasons why I like Fark so much, old news for some is still news for others. Cheers! :)
 
2013-10-29 04:43:28 PM  
pute kisses like a man:
and then there's the ku klux klan... in addition to racism, they probably want some degree of socialism, or at least, some strong protectionist economic strategies, because they're predominately poor white people that don't like competition, and would rather have high tariffs so they don't have to compete with the rest of the world..

From anything I've been able to gather, which is limited, the hard core racist/nationalist pretty much think that the only reasons they're not succeeding is because the (people they don't like) are preventing them with one unfair tactic or another, and if they would just get out of the way of hard working (whatever thing they are) folk, everything would be fine. So really not Socialism.
 
2013-10-29 04:43:38 PM  
maybe its hard to run after all the goosestepping
 
2013-10-29 04:46:17 PM  
In 1996

It's not news, it's Fark.combecause it happened nearly 20 years ago.
 
Bf+
2013-10-29 04:46:52 PM  

vygramul: Can't get a better use of that tag than that.


I'd have to disagree.
Perfectly appropriate tag for this story, don't get me wrong, but "can't get better"?
I mean, what if the guy, I dunno, wasn't a Nazi... you know?
 
2013-10-29 04:48:13 PM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: raanne: mutterfark: Because some stories of courage and decency are inspiring enough to be re-told?

I don't disagree. I just literally meant what was the reason for retelling this specific story? I remember it well, it got a lot of press. I was just wondering if there was something related that caused it to pop back up. No arguments that its a great story worth retelling from me though.

Dunno.  It was in the BBC Features and Analysis section on my phone, which is usually where all the stories I want to read end up.   Maybe the person who kept the picture for 17 years contacted the BBC, maybe someone stumbled across the photo and decided to do a what happened after story, (shrug).

But I live here now, and I didn't in 96, and it was a great story to read.  Something to keep in mind if I ever get put into a situation like that.  I'd hope I wouldn't go with Angry Mob.


That.
FTA: Teri Gunderson, who now lives in Oaxaca, Mexico, emailed BBC News Magazine about her respect for Keshia Thomas when we published a series about kindness earlier this month
 
2013-10-29 04:48:51 PM  

CygnusDarius: The Psycology behind the study of crowd mentality would place the mob lynching as a normal reaction, When everyone else does it, is okay.

So, under that pretense, would that mean that this woman was ill-adjusted? Because if that's the case, I want to see more ill-adjusted people.


She isn't a sheople.
 
2013-10-29 04:49:28 PM  

kg2095: She isn't a sheople.


So why when we shave her does she turn pink?
 
2013-10-29 04:50:24 PM  

sweetmelissa31: Thomas has never heard from the man she saved

Ugh. Asshole doesn't even have the nerve to thank her.


No, but his son did, and that goes to prove that even an asshole can have a decent kid...
 
2013-10-29 04:53:17 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: ongbok: Sin_City_Superhero: "She put herself at physical risk to protect someone who, in my opinion, would not have done the same for her," he says. "Who does that in this world?"


That's one hell of an assumption you've got there. You have no idea how this man would've reacted, had the roles been reversed. For all you know, he might've done the exact same thing. That said, it was nice of her to save Andy Ried, like that.  Chief's fans everywhere would like to thank you...

For some reason I don't think a person who thinks Black people should be property and aren't equal to him would risk his own safety to save a black woman that was being beaten by a mob of people that thought like him. Call me crazy, but I don't think it would happen

sweetmelissa31: Considering he was at a rally to demonstrate his hate for blacks, Jews, etc. and he never even thanked her for saving him, the assumption seems to be a good one. If he can't say thank you, what makes you think he'd go into harm's way to help her?

Well, she was at a rally to protest against what this guy stood for, and she did the right thing any way. It is possible that, given a reversal of roles, he would've done the same thing.


She was there to protest against hate and intolerance, he was there to promote hate and intolerance. For some reason I think a person who is standing up against hate and intolerance would be more incline to stop someone, even a person they disliked, from getting beaten than a person who's belief system revolves around believing that certain people are less than him and should be killed because of it.
 
2013-10-29 04:59:50 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: [img.fark.net image 464x464]

Am I the only one that thinks something looks a little "off", in this picture? It looks like it's staged, or something. It looks like the redneck guy is trying to look like he's running, but the people behind him don't look like they're chasing someone. Maybe it's just me, but it looks odd, for some reason.


Looks to me like he's sort of fast walking, hopping into the start of a jog, while they're shooing him off and some are getting excited.

I suspect he hurls back in insult sometime after this and the mob kicks into gear.
 
2013-10-29 05:09:02 PM  
img.fark.net

clarksvillewtf.com

/shenanigans.
 
2013-10-29 05:10:55 PM  

ongbok: Kid Shelleen: ongbok:
Kid Shelleen: macadamnut: It was unclear whether the man was a Ku Klux Klan supporter, but to the anti-KKK protesters, his clothes and tattoos represented exactly what they had come to resist. The Confederate flag he wore was for them a symbol of hatred and racism, while the SS tattoo on his arm pointed to a belief in white supremacy, or worse.

What was unclear about it?

Playing Devil's Advocate, perhaps he was repentant and wanted to stand with the protestors as an act of bravery against "his kind."  I'd truly like to know more about him.  He was, after all, apparently standing peacefully with the protestors, not marching with the bad guys.

He was being a troll and got his ass kicked by a bunch of people who were tired of these racist assholes. In the 90's the Klan was known for holding rallies in cities where they knew they wouldn't be accepted and sending one of their more ignorant members out into the crowd to get a violent reaction from the crowd. They did this in several cities in the 90's, and there was even a Nightline segment about one of their rallies were one of their members that was sent out into the crowd to troll got his ass kicked, and after the other Klan members were watching the tape of it high fiveing and congratulating each other that they got the crowd to act violently.

OK, I can see that,  I remember Skokie, as well, and that was the '70s.  Still, I'd like to know more about him.  Did this affect his outlook?  Was his assumed racism solidified by the mob attacking him or did he see the light thanks to the nice woman in the article?  Even bigots can be capable of introspection.

If he was dumb enough to go into that crowd wearing that stuff, blatantly throwing racism in their faces knowing he was probably going to take a bad beating, then he wasn't smart enough to change his ways. Think about it, he was the one that was so farking dumb that the rest of the group felt that he could be sacrificed and thought nothing of it. Hell this guy probably would say he was doing his part to get the race war started.


I am thinking about it. I'm just not willing to fully commit to your conclusions. And no, he didn't deserve an ass-whipping. Even if he hurled insults, he didn't do anything to deserve violence levelled against him. That's kind of the point of the article.
 
2013-10-29 05:14:44 PM  

sweetmelissa31: Thomas has never heard from the man she saved

Ugh. Asshole doesn't even have the nerve to thank her.


Dude probably shot himself later that night due to his white power failing him.

/out farking standing on the girl's part
//I hope I can be that brave when the time comes
///likely, I'd have just sat back, watched the ass kicking, and then acted appropriately horrified later
 
2013-10-29 05:16:30 PM  
Keshia Thomas was 18 when the Ku Klux Klan,

Wait, which one are they?

the white supremacist organisation, held a rally in her home town in Michigan.

Oh, that one. Okay, I got it. Proceed.
 
2013-10-29 05:20:00 PM  

IdBeCrazyIf: ongbok: He was being a troll and got his ass kicked by a bunch of people who were tired of these racist assholes. In the 90's the Klan was known for holding rallies in cities where they knew they wouldn't be accepted and sending one of their more ignorant members out into the crowd to get a violent reaction from the crowd. They did this in several cities in the 90's, and there was even a Nightline segment about one of their rallies were one of their members that was sent out into the crowd to troll got his ass kicked, and after the other Klan members were watching the tape of it high fiveing and congratulating each other that they got the crowd to act violently.

Still, in some degree he proved them guilty of the exact same behavior of prejudging other based on their appearance.

He still deserved his ass whipped for being a troll, I'm just saying he got what he wanted


There's a difference between judging somebody by the way they conduct themselves in public, such as wearing a confederate flag and having Nazi tattoos,  and judging someone because of the skin-color that their ancestors passed down.
 
2013-10-29 05:28:55 PM  

SirEattonHogg: She's a better person that me.  I would have popped open a beer and watched the beat down.


Honestly, I can't be sure what I would have done either.  I'd be tempted to call the police, put on "Yakkity Sax" / Benny Hill theme (whatever it's called) and watch things unfold while drinking beer as well.

raanne: I remember this. I was in High School. In Ann Arbor. This was really big news 17 years ago. Why are we talking about it now?


Because this was just published in the BBC and I never heard of it until now?  As the article said, this was just submitted to the BBC as an example of great/unusual acts of kindness.

Sidenote:  Surprising number of people expressing some...  Resentment of this tale of a black person acting as a good human being.  I wonder why that is?
 
2013-10-29 05:33:11 PM  

ongbok: Sin_City_Superhero: ongbok: Sin_City_Superhero: "She put herself at physical risk to protect someone who, in my opinion, would not have done the same for her," he says. "Who does that in this world?"


That's one hell of an assumption you've got there. You have no idea how this man would've reacted, had the roles been reversed. For all you know, he might've done the exact same thing. That said, it was nice of her to save Andy Ried, like that.  Chief's fans everywhere would like to thank you...

For some reason I don't think a person who thinks Black people should be property and aren't equal to him would risk his own safety to save a black woman that was being beaten by a mob of people that thought like him. Call me crazy, but I don't think it would happen

sweetmelissa31: Considering he was at a rally to demonstrate his hate for blacks, Jews, etc. and he never even thanked her for saving him, the assumption seems to be a good one. If he can't say thank you, what makes you think he'd go into harm's way to help her?

Well, she was at a rally to protest against what this guy stood for, and she did the right thing any way. It is possible that, given a reversal of roles, he would've done the same thing.

She was there to protest against hate and intolerance, he was there to promote hate and intolerance. For some reason I think a person who is standing up against hate and intolerance would be more incline to stop someone, even a person they disliked, from getting beaten than a person who's belief system revolves around believing that certain people are less than him and should be killed because of it.


That's probably one of the best and most wholehearted statements I have ever heard from anyone in the last 30 years or so.

/stop it
//this is Fark.
 
2013-10-29 05:33:43 PM  

macadamnut: It was unclear whether the man was a Ku Klux Klan supporter, but to the anti-KKK protesters, his clothes and tattoos represented exactly what they had come to resist. The Confederate flag he wore was for them a symbol of hatred and racism, while the SS tattoo on his arm pointed to a belief in white supremacy, or worse.

What was unclear about it?


Maybe he was undercover?
 
2013-10-29 05:38:24 PM  

kerrigand: a person who's belief system revolves around believing that certain people are less than him and should be killed because of it.


Not arguing with anything you've said. I just wanted to pull out this quote to point out that it could be used to describe a lot of religious people (from various religions, no less).
 
2013-10-29 05:40:59 PM  

ongbok: Sin_City_Superhero: ongbok: Sin_City_Superhero: "She put herself at physical risk to protect someone who, in my opinion, would not have done the same for her," he says. "Who does that in this world?"


That's one hell of an assumption you've got there. You have no idea how this man would've reacted, had the roles been reversed. For all you know, he might've done the exact same thing. That said, it was nice of her to save Andy Ried, like that.  Chief's fans everywhere would like to thank you...

For some reason I don't think a person who thinks Black people should be property and aren't equal to him would risk his own safety to save a black woman that was being beaten by a mob of people that thought like him. Call me crazy, but I don't think it would happen

sweetmelissa31: Considering he was at a rally to demonstrate his hate for blacks, Jews, etc. and he never even thanked her for saving him, the assumption seems to be a good one. If he can't say thank you, what makes you think he'd go into harm's way to help her?

Well, she was at a rally to protest against what this guy stood for, and she did the right thing any way. It is possible that, given a reversal of roles, he would've done the same thing.

She was there to protest against hate and intolerance, he was there to promote hate and intolerance. For some reason I think a person who is standing up against hate and intolerance would be more incline to stop someone, even a person they disliked, from getting beaten than a person who's belief system revolves around believing that certain people are less than him and should be killed because of it.


And with that, I would say, you really know how to bring a thread to a halt.

/Done in this one
//Can't argue with that
//if you do, well, there's a tag waiting for you
 
2013-10-29 05:44:25 PM  
IdBeCrazyIf: Still, in some degree he proved them guilty of the exact same behavior of prejudging other based on their appearance.

I call bullshiat. The aspects of his appearance by which he was being judged were entirely under his control. Equating judging someone negatively because of the color of their skin with judging someone negatively because they have actively chosen to project an image with negative connotations is just plain stupid.
 
2013-10-29 05:46:09 PM  
1. You do know the Klan was started by, funded by and approved by the Democrat Party. You do know that, right?
2. You do know the Klan - meaning the Democrat Party - lynched hundreds of blacks following the Civil War. Right?
3. You do remember that it was the Republican Party that, essentially, won the war to end slavery and free blacks to become Citizens?

(wait for it. you know it's coming in the comments)
 
2013-10-29 05:52:39 PM  

Clemkadidlefark: 1. You do know the Klan was started by, funded by and approved by the Democrat Party. You do know that, right?
2. You do know the Klan - meaning the Democrat Party - lynched hundreds of blacks following the Civil War. Right?
3. You do remember that it was the Republican Party that, essentially, won the war to end slavery and free blacks to become Citizens?

(wait for it. you know it's coming in the comments)


Yes. People know that. They also know it was conservatives.
 
2013-10-29 05:52:49 PM  

Clemkadidlefark: 1. You do know the Klan was started by, funded by and approved by the Democrat Party. You do know that, right?
2. You do know the Klan - meaning the Democrat Party - lynched hundreds of blacks following the Civil War. Right?
3. You do remember that it was the Republican Party that, essentially, won the war to end slavery and free blacks to become Citizens?

(wait for it. you know it's coming in the comments)


Yup. And within twenty years, the Republican party turned its back on them, and then in the early to mid-twentieth century, the Democratic party slowly started to embrace the growing civil rights movement. Disgusted racist southern Democrats left the party, formed the Dixiecrat party, failed miserably, and then the Republicans came up with The Southern Strategy. And here we are.
 
2013-10-29 05:54:56 PM  
What bravery. Oh no, what's this? It seems to be getting a bit dusty in here...
 
2013-10-29 05:54:58 PM  

scottydoesntknow: /Good story!


Well your meme is really confusing since the lynch mob behind him were the only racists that day.
 
2013-10-29 05:56:14 PM  
Teri Gunderson, who was bringing up her two adopted mixed-race daughters in Iowa at the time,

The true hero of the story.
Seriously though, why does she get paragraphs in this story? Thomas is the hero, not this random broad.
 
2013-10-29 06:01:33 PM  
Wow.

Awesome article, Subby. Thanks!
 
2013-10-29 06:03:52 PM  

I Browse: I'm waiting to hear how this will somehow be spun to make her the bad guy. Don't let me down Fark.



Well, I was thinking she was a hero like everyone else, but then I found out he was from Illinois.
 
2013-10-29 06:04:15 PM  

strathmeyer: scottydoesntknow: /Good story!

Well your meme is really confusing since the lynch mob behind him were the only racists that day.


So what race were they discriminating against? Stupid asshole isn't a race.
 
2013-10-29 06:05:14 PM  

h0tsauce: Clemkadidlefark: 1. You do know the Klan was started by, funded by and approved by the Democrat Party. You do know that, right?
2. You do know the Klan - meaning the Democrat Party - lynched hundreds of blacks following the Civil War. Right?
3. You do remember that it was the Republican Party that, essentially, won the war to end slavery and free blacks to become Citizens?

(wait for it. you know it's coming in the comments)

Yup. And within twenty years, the Republican party turned its back on them, and then in the early to mid-twentieth century, the Democratic party slowly started to embrace the growing civil rights movement. Disgusted racist southern Democrats left the party, formed the Dixiecrat party, failed miserably, and then the Republicans came up with The Southern Strategy. And here we are.


No and in the same way that you backassdwards your earlier statement.

h0tsauce: IdBeCrazyIf: Still, in some degree he proved them guilty of the exact same behavior of prejudging other based on their appearance.

I call bullshiat. The aspects of his appearance by which he was being judged were entirely under his control. Equating judging someone negatively because of the color of their skin with judging someone negatively because they have actively chosen to project an image with negative connotations is just plain stupid.



 I'll give you time to rethink those. They just don't mesh for some reason......
 
2013-10-29 06:06:36 PM  

strathmeyer: scottydoesntknow: /Good story!

Well your meme is really confusing since the lynch mob behind him were the only racists that day.


The predominately white crowd behind him?
 
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