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(NPR)   More and more smug "reverse commuters" are learning that maybe they didn't think their cunning plan all the way through   (npr.org) divider line 56
    More: Amusing, slog, commuters, Deerfield, Metra  
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28800 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Oct 2013 at 12:45 PM (47 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2013-10-29 12:25:32 PM
18 votes:
Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.
2013-10-29 12:50:18 PM
7 votes:
So by "reverse commuters" you mean...commuters.
2013-10-29 01:00:04 PM
4 votes:

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: That's what keeps Kathy LeVeque, 31, in Chicago, too. "I'm a city person," she says.

Then get a city job.


Yes, jobs are plentiful and everywhere and are all the same and equally good and appropriate. Jobs are also secure and not at all volatile and you can count on being in the same job until you retire so base your long-term home location decisions on the job you have right at this very moment.
2013-10-29 03:01:52 PM
3 votes:
"Nothing to do in the suburbs"

I keep seeing this phrase pop up when people defend living in the city, as if people who are burdened with a commute - traveling to the city - are somehow incapable of traveling to some place, I don't know where, and doing things.  Is it that suburbs are simply block-to-block residential districts , with no industry, manufacturing, commerce, entertainment, nothing but driveway and front lawn until you magically cross some threshold and you're "downtown", that also stop all travel except when you're going to work?

<sarcasm>Naw, they aren't biased at all.</sarcasm>

Look, there are some people that cherish a 'city life'.  I know folks who don't own driver's license, much less a car, have never used the stove in their apartment, and the only thing in their fridge is liquor, soda, and bottled water.  They parrot these things like badges of honor.  They enjoy the fact that they treat nearly 100% of their income as disposable, and despite the higher costs for food, housing, reliance on public transport, and a disproportionately larger part of their budget spent on entertainment.  Perhaps because they can go get drunk at bars and clubs and not have to drive home is enough to allow them to feel privileged and happy, even if it does mean paying yet more money for a taxi.  Though in retrospect, I've seen a lot of people throw up on a subway...

There are also people who enjoy living away from constant noise, people, and traffic, who actually like to look at the night sky and see stars instead of just reflections of neon and billboards off glass-fronted skyscrapers.  Folks who like being able to modify their house to suit their needs, to build a tree fort for their kids, to take a nice bike ride without having to suck exhaust and dodge both cars and people in a slow, lethal crawl.  Maybe they live minutes or less from a river or lake, a forest, a mountain, a baseball diamond, a soccer field, a playground, schools not covered in graffiti,where neighbors, shopkeepers and even police smile and greet you by name.  Property is half or less the cost of an apartment half the size or less.  On the downside, almost nothing is less than a 15 minute round trip away.

Personally, I find the idea of having to share a wall with one or more other people an irritation - both to my own noise generation, as well as theirs.  I find the idea of being beholden to a bus or train schedule fairly limiting, especially when it often takes multiple transfers and waits.  Simply buying material goods is harder; I currently spend an hour a week shopping for the entire following week, but if I don't have a car, I'm limited to what I can carry in two hands and I have to spend 30 minutes to an hour every other day.  Ever try to buy a couch in downtown NYC, or a bed mattress?  (Note: do not be the guy in the office with a car, or worse, a truck - to you beggars, F-off, coworkers are not your delivery service.  Pay 100$ for that, take a day off work for the delivery window and wait 4 weeks for your lack of foresight and life decisions).

Yeah, there's compromises to be made, like a commute and living with an HOA, and lawn mowing, and so on - but there's compromises in the other direction too.  It all comes down to priorities.  I can't argue for the city life in this case, but that's because I'm biased against it.  My priorities are in the other direction.  Still, at least I'm aware that I'm completely biased, and don't claim my opinions or personal experience are facts or apples-to-apples comparisons.
2013-10-29 01:39:50 PM
3 votes:

Cold_Sassy: Rapmaster2000: Cold_Sassy: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

Unless you happen to be a hiker or other type of nature lover.

Good point.  It takes me up to an hour to get to the mountains on Saturday.  If I lived in the burbs, it would only take 45 minutes.

I'm talking about doing it every day to decompress and exercise the dogs, not some hipster weekend hobby.


So what you're saying is, these hipsters just don't enjoy nature as authentically as you do.  For them, nature is just some casual hobby.  They're not out there living the real nature lifestyle like you are.  They're just a bunch of poseurs.

If only there were a name for people that looked down on others for not being sufficiently authentic.
2013-10-29 01:39:16 PM
3 votes:
We made a choice to build out in the boonies because we got more house for our buck, schools were good, taxes are freaking low, crime is practically non-existent and the area is clean. I can step outside on a summer night and watch meteor showers that would be drowned out by light pollution in the city.

When I worked downtown it was a 15 minute drive to the train station then an hour ride in while I slept or read. Now I have to drive to another suburb which takes me 90 minutes  for a 50 mile trip. It sucks but I catch up on my audio books.

Suggesting that people just move to be closer to their jobs might be slightly feasible if you are single and know your job is for life but it's not realistic for the rest of us. I've worked for tech companies that have been bought out or moved out of state requiring me to get a new job. So I'm supposed to move every time I get a new position just to avoid a longer commute? Not to mention how absolutely stellar the housing market is. I do try to look for jobs where I can use public transportation or where the drive isn't outrageous but sometimes you have to suck it up and work wherever the jobs are, especially when the economy goes down the crapper.
2013-10-29 01:29:02 PM
3 votes:
The problem is that people work 5 days a week, 50 weeks a year. They cram enjoyment of the different into two weeks, generally two weeks shared by a bunch of cortisol OD'ing people in the same boat.

Quit your job, burn your possessions, and go for a walkabout.
2013-10-29 01:05:47 PM
3 votes:
I wish I was a city person, my commute would be almost zero. Unfortunately, I love to live out in the woods as far as possibly which equals a horrendous commute daily for me. Wish I could find a well paying job in the boonies. As soon as I do I will be alot happier. Why you would want to live in the city and commute out of it is beyond me.
2013-10-29 12:59:46 PM
3 votes:

Jim_Callahan: Wouldn't a reverse commute be driving away from work at the start of the work-day, then returning to work at the end of the work-day, i.e. the night shift?

This is just a normal commute, the destination being in the suburbs doesn't actually make it not a commute.


This.  Your commute is scalar, not a vector.
2013-10-29 12:53:04 PM
3 votes:

HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.


Some people can't afford to live within a few miles of their workplace.
2013-10-29 12:52:19 PM
3 votes:

The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.


You're right, he should 'choose' to get a job at a labratory closer to his house. Say, right next door. That would be totally ideal. What a moron, right?
2013-10-29 03:35:54 PM
2 votes:

The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.


How about feeling bad for someone who chose to work 4 miles from home, and whose multinational company spun off their division and sold it to a competitor (whose owner the CEO just happens to be friends with) whose office is 36 miles away? Oh yeah, and who can't get a job with a different competitor because the GOP's budget antics have thrown a huge wet blanket on our whole industry...

Because that's what happened to me. I didn't WANT a long commute and I found a job without one - only to get dicked over by business buddies of Mitt Romney (literally) and then have my options dry up while the Tea Party douchebags fark us up with the sequester then throw salt in the wound with the shutdown.

I'm just am trying to suck it up for the time being and hoping that next year folks will be hiring again in my industry.
2013-10-29 02:33:11 PM
2 votes:

Jarhead_h: It's real simple people, move to were you work.  If that means a cheap apartment instead of a giant mortgage, oh well. BTW you're insane to buy anything less than several acres anyway, because if you buy land you can build a shop or grow a cashcrop - something to make the land pay for itself.  A "house" is just a never ending series of expenses culminating in a market crash where you end up owing more than  it can be sold for.


Moving to where you work can be tricky if you have a significant other who also works. Also rent vs buy is very much a case-by-case. There is no one size fits all. With a 4.XX% mortgage locked for 30 years it is moderately cheaper for me to buy (where I live) than it is to rent, and that's in Year 1. Add in a few years of even modest rent inflation and it becomes considerably cheaper. That said - if you're planning on moving soon, aren't taking on a mortgage that gets you a big tax break or are in an area with cheap rental then renting might be a better choice.

trickymoo: So he goes out and gets his chickens in line. Price is 200k. My friend then offers the guy 190 makes his offer for 190 and locked it. Saturday morning, seller shows up and is in shock. 'uh what were you thinking man??'. Guy moved the shiat in 24 hours for 375k to some 50 year old lawyer who was tired of having to make the commute from Manassas.


In case anyone thinks you can buy a 3 bed apartment in Ballston for only $375k - that price is a steal and doesn't reflect the HOA dues, which will be in the range of $600 to $1200/month.
2013-10-29 02:33:05 PM
2 votes:

The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.


I used to feel to feel the same way. I purchased my home a couple mile from where I worked and then my employer relocated 10 miles away.

Add in a significant other, it gets even more complicated. Mine works downtown and my job moved to a tech center on the opposite side of town. Luckily, a train line will open a few blocks away in a year and we'll both be able to commute by train.

The guy from the article lives at the mid-point between his job and his wife's job.

Our economy shifts too quickly and has sprawled too widely to make it realistic to pack up and buy a new house everytime a job situation. Many people are just lucky to have a job and can't get choosey about where it's located.
2013-10-29 02:23:19 PM
2 votes:
TFA: "his 35-mile commute out to Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago's southwest suburbs..."

Farkers: WHY NOT JUST MOVE CLOSER?  OR GET ANOTHER JOB!  GET ANOTHER HOUSE!

TFA: "Why not just move closer to his job? Jim's wife, Susan, has a long commute to a northern suburb in the opposite direction of Jim's."

Farkers:  GET ANOTHER JOB, HOUSE, AND WIFE!!! AAAAAARRRGH!!!
2013-10-29 01:19:58 PM
2 votes:

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


George approves this message.

www.delawareonline.com
2013-10-29 01:19:07 PM
2 votes:

HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.


Also a cunning plan, but who can afford to move every time they get a new job?   The days when you'd work at one place for 30 years are over.
2013-10-29 01:04:38 PM
2 votes:

Rent Party: Chicago is one of the few midwestern cities I'd move to, primarily because of the CTA.  I love those trains, and it's a great town.


I used to love the CTA until I had to use it everyday.

The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live is'nt me.


FTFY
2013-10-29 01:02:21 PM
2 votes:

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

Some people can't afford to live within a few miles of their workplace.


The guy in TFA lives in Chicago and commutes to the 'burbs.  Unless he lives in a really rough neighborhood in Chicago, the suburbs are going to be around the same price, if not  cheaper.  Remember, people went to the suburbs in the first place because land is cheaper than in the city.  The people choosing to live in the city (and commute to the suburbs) aren't doing it to save money, they're doing it because they like the social/cultural aspects of the city better.  And it's fine if they want to make that choice, but don't cry about your commute when it's a lifestyle choice.

I recognize that not being able to afford to move is an issue for some people, but it's hardly the only reason people commute.  People might choose to live in different places for social reasons (or to get away from minorities in certain cases, if we're being honest), or to have perceived better schools for their kids, or to be able to afford more land on the same salary, etc.   I have all the sympathy in the world for people who are forced into commuting based on where they can afford to live, but minimal sympathy for people who choose a long commute.
2013-10-29 01:01:56 PM
2 votes:
Actually, the crappy commute in the Chicago area is the suburb-to-suburb, east - west commute. It took at least 50+ minutes for me to get to my old job, 22 miles away. I would have loved to take the train, but the train system is just radial in and out of the city, so that meant one 55 minute ride into the city and another 45 minute ride out to the other suburb. Until we accept that people need mass transit from suburb to suburb it will continue to be a problem. I will never ever take another job that's over a 30 minute commute ever again, even if trains are an option. I miss quality time a home too much.

/new job is much closer
//traffic makes people crazy
///slashies crazy
2013-10-29 12:56:57 PM
2 votes:
I still feel pretty smug when I'm going 80 mph while the other side of the highway is a parking lot for 15+ miles.

media.nowpublic.net

Regardless, all of the suburbs is a traffic jam now.  My coworkers live closer to the office than I do and their commutes are twice as long.  When I ask why they don't move closer to the office (because to me a suburb is a suburb as I'm sure the city is the city to them) they say it's because in the suburb around the office the houses aren't big enough for your money.  One dude just bought a 5500 sq ft house for a family of four.  I get it that $400k is a pretty good price for all of that sq. footage.  I can't say a 15 mile, one hour commute makes that worth it.
2013-10-29 12:54:04 PM
2 votes:
If you can't guess what "reverse commuter" means, subby isn't at the top of the list of people you should be mad at.

/not subby
2013-10-29 12:53:55 PM
2 votes:

LandOfChocolate: nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.

Don't be thick.

It used to be that people commuted in from the suburbs to jobs in the city.  The other way during rush hour generally saw lighter traffic.

Apparently that is not the case any more.


Isn't that good, though? If both directions are getting equal use that's way more efficient than everybody trying to go one way.
2013-10-29 12:51:46 PM
2 votes:

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


Don't be thick.

It used to be that people commuted in from the suburbs to jobs in the city.  The other way during rush hour generally saw lighter traffic.

Apparently that is not the case any more.
2013-10-29 12:50:21 PM
2 votes:
Wouldn't a reverse commute be driving away from work at the start of the work-day, then returning to work at the end of the work-day, i.e. the night shift?

This is just a normal commute, the destination being in the suburbs doesn't actually make it not a commute.
2013-10-29 12:47:57 PM
2 votes:
So they drive to work in reverse? That seems needlessly dangerous.
2013-10-29 12:26:11 PM
2 votes:
It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.
2013-10-29 04:51:53 PM
1 votes:
My commute goes from my bedroom to my home office, with stops at the bathroom and coffee maker. Never been so productive in my life.

Melissa Mayer can kiss my ass.
2013-10-29 03:20:01 PM
1 votes:
I'm a double super secret reverse anti-commuter.  I live in the suburbs and work 4 minutes away from my home.  booya!
2013-10-29 03:17:00 PM
1 votes:

WinoRhino: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

I bought a house out in the suburbs. I'm a 10 minute walk to the commuter rail into downtown Boston. 30 minute ride. I used to just hang out in town after work and then take a train home later in the evening. Best of both worlds.

Anyhow, the article amused me. I love it when people say they're "city people" but are annoyed about having to share roads and other public resources with a lot of other people.


Would like to point out here that the commuter rail is COMPLETELY different than the other public transportation here in Boston. My wife takes the Red Line from Quincy to Boston and most people on there are just complete trash with no manners or class. Every day she sees a pregnant woman or elderly person standing while a bunch of able bodied younger people pretend not to notice them. Of course you have the thugs, junkies and crazy homeless along for the ride too, what a nightmare.
2013-10-29 02:53:27 PM
1 votes:

HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.


Yeah, silly me! Why didn't I think to move from my affordable home to a city whose shiattiest houses START at $1 million?

Thanks for the tip, asshat!

/asshat
2013-10-29 02:21:02 PM
1 votes:

WhiskeyBoy: lordargent: My area, in a nutshell.

Commuting: Live where the property is affordable, commute to work (an area where property is expensive and salaries are higher).

VS

Reverse Commuting: Live where the property is expensive, commute to work (an area where property is cheaper and salaries are lower).

[synapticnulship.com image 425x340]

Uh.  This.  I work in DC.  For the federal government.  And not as a contractor.  Which means I can't afford to live anywhere within a 30 mile radius of the DC border without living in total squalor.

If I worked in the suburbs where my home is, I'd be making at least $15k less annually.  And then wouldn't be able to afford my home.

And in the DC Metro area, it doesn't matter if you're going in to or out of DC, all ten rush hours per day suck.


A friend of mine lives in a apt right across from the Ballson Metro. One of the other tennants owned his 3 br setup there. He came to my buddy (29) and said Look im gonna sell, get your stuff together and make an offer and ill give you priority. sale is in two weeks on a given Friday.

So he goes out and gets his chickens in line. Price is 200k. My friend then offers the guy 190 makes his offer for 190 and locked it. Saturday morning, seller shows up and is in shock. 'uh what were you thinking man??'. Guy moved the shiat in 24 hours for 375k to some 50 year old lawyer who was tired of having to make the commute from Manassas.

That commute is what keeps the prices high.

/Arlington near Westover
2013-10-29 02:08:23 PM
1 votes:

meat0918: This was something to be smug about?!?!?



Not in tfa as far as I could tell. I didn't see anyone acting particularly smug about living in Chicago, just a little matter-of-fact 'I like living in a big city'. I think submitter was imagining things again.
2013-10-29 01:54:28 PM
1 votes:

The Lone Gunman: So by "reverse commuters" you mean...commuters.


I thought this was "coming to work at 5, going home at 9", not "commuting"...
2013-10-29 01:52:15 PM
1 votes:
I can't believe how many people can't grasp the term "reverse commute."

Imagine it this way: during morning rush hour, if you looked at a highway, you'd likely see bumper-to-bumper traffic headed from the suburbs to the city, and lighter traffic headed away from the city.  On the subway, you'd have people packed in like sardines from the outlying areas to the city center, but once the trains leave the city center, it's easy to get a seat.

Having a term for reverse commuting (in my experience) is a way of saying that you don't have to put up with all the bullshiat that comes from rush hour, because you're going in the opposite direction of the normal flow of people.

The article is saying that the flow is evening out (at least in Chicago), because more jobs are opening up in the suburbs, while living in the city is becoming more attractive, so all the reverse commuters who thought they had such a good deal aren't getting a better commute than traditional commuters.
2013-10-29 01:45:19 PM
1 votes:

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


It's like "reverse racism", there's no such thing. Racism is racism no matter which race it is targeting.
2013-10-29 01:40:38 PM
1 votes:
Remember this: this guy's 35-mile one way commute is long for forward or reverse commute. I will add that this guy has to be in the northern part of the city, as far from Argonne as possible.  He is more than reverse commuting, he is going all the way through the city.  Chicago's highways are always busy, but way worse in the peak direction.
2013-10-29 01:35:01 PM
1 votes:
People who live in the city can avoid a long commute only by working in the (same) city. People who live in the suburbs pretty much can't avoid a painful commute, because even if you're job is also in the 'burbs, it's likely to be in a different part of the sprawl. Being sprawled out is, after all, the whole point of suburbs.

Some people have suggested moving to live near work. That can work in the city, because you can restrict your job search to that city. Now that the days of lifetime employment are over, though, an attempt to operate that way in the suburbs would be a little like the old Steve Martin routine:
I know a lot of you people are sitting out there saying to yourselves, "Steve - you're a rambling guy. Is it tough for you, traveling from town to town, staying in different hotels every night, all alone, not with your friends?" Well, I've kind of worked that out now, I've got a whole new policy. Like, I came into New York early this morning, bought a house. Met a cute gal, got married. We had a little baby, another one on the way. Tomorrow: wake up, have a home-cooked meal, sell the house, get a divorce, and get on to the next town. So, this is what Steve is doing now.
2013-10-29 01:30:19 PM
1 votes:

HailRobonia: Gunny Highway: I love my commute.  Two 30-40 minute train rides a day  allow me to listen to podcasts, music, or read.  All that said, I really miss driving to work.

For me, time-wise, public transportation makes sense. But the big problem with public transportation is the public. It's hard to relax and enjoy my commute when we're all crammed into a train like cattle, surrounded by jerk-ass people who won't move further into the car, stink, cough and sneeze all over the place, jam you in the back with their over-sized purses, smash you with their giant backpacks, and other assorted unpleasantness.


That is all part of the process, I guess.  I try to sit in the Quiet Car every day which people respect for the most part.  The conductors do a good job of policing people who do not respect the rules which I appreciate.

The scenery is nice and the ride is smooth.
2013-10-29 01:23:24 PM
1 votes:

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


I was reading the article to see what the hell "reverse commuting was. Then I was wondering if this was like "reverse racism" in that there is nothing "reverse" about it.

I guess so.
2013-10-29 01:17:52 PM
1 votes:

brantgoose: Reverse commuting sounds almost good to me. I've seen the highways during rush hour--backed up for blocks in one direction only with scarcely a car going the other way. If you're in the car going the other way, life is sweet, man!

It is not enough for that successful man that other people have to fail, they have to be seen to fail. To paraphrase a famous quip.

Mind you, I don't commute at all. I walk to and from work, 2.5 kilometers each way in roughly the time it would take to go by bus. Even better than driving past people stuck in a traffic jam--walking past people stuck in a traffic jam. But I try to avoid traffic altogether as I am a bit asthmatic and the smog makes me gag sometimes.

Even picking my way through the snow in other people's footprints is better than being jammed in a bus full of hot people in winter clothing that turns the air into something you'd expect in a laundry or in a mud room full of sweaters and mittens and wet boots.



I like your honesty. I appreciate how you found a way to make your commute work for you. Despite your attempt at gloating, you acknowledge that there are drawbacks to your choice and believe in full disclosure. I look forward to reading your newsletter and will buy cookies from your girl scouts. Sir, Ma'am, I salute you.
2013-10-29 01:09:57 PM
1 votes:

El Morro: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

Yeah... because it's just that easy.  You ass.

In any case, I had a 3 hour round trip commute for a while.  It was hell.   My condolences to those of you on that kind of grind. These days, if a song starts on the radio when I get in my car, it's still playing when I pull into the parking lot at my job.  It's tough to put into words just how wonderful a short commute is.  It's a quality of life issue, really.


I never said it was easy.  But the people interviewed in TFA have, at least if we can judge from such quotes as "I'm a city person," chosen this lifestyle.  As I said above, if someone prefers a certain area for a reason, that's fine.  And if they're willing to commute in order to enjoy the area they want to live in, that's fine too.

But in life you often can't have it both ways and that's the case here.  The people in TFA want to live in the city while working in the suburbs and they don't like commuting.  Well.....those goals aren't compatible.

Look, I'm very sympathetic to people who have no choice WRT long commutes due to economic circumstances.  But that's not the people in TFA.  They're complaining about a commute that they chose for themselves, and that's annoying.
2013-10-29 01:07:20 PM
1 votes:
4 mile commute. Less than ten minutes everyday. Have a nice day.
2013-10-29 01:06:42 PM
1 votes:
Obama is diligently working on this. Over the next few years only people in D.C. and northeast Virginia will have jobs to commute to.
2013-10-29 01:04:12 PM
1 votes:

Gunny Highway: I love my commute.  Two 30-40 minute train rides a day  allow me to listen to podcasts, music, or read.  All that said, I really miss driving to work.


For me, time-wise, public transportation makes sense. But the big problem with public transportation is the public. It's hard to relax and enjoy my commute when we're all crammed into a train like cattle, surrounded by jerk-ass people who won't move further into the car, stink, cough and sneeze all over the place, jam you in the back with their over-sized purses, smash you with their giant backpacks, and other assorted unpleasantness.
2013-10-29 01:01:39 PM
1 votes:

van1ty: I have a 90 minute commute one way every day.  Easily spend 120 bucks a week in gas.


I also have a slow commute and used to do it in a mustang.  Bought a Prius C -- it has a gas and electric engine -- basic model is under 20k and I get 53 mpg.  What you save in gas would cover the payments.
2013-10-29 01:00:30 PM
1 votes:
If you;'re a woman and live in the city but commute to the country for your cattle herding job, does that make you a reverse cowgirl?
2013-10-29 01:00:14 PM
1 votes:
I love my commute.  Two 30-40 minute train rides a day  allow me to listen to podcasts, music, or read.  All that said, I really miss driving to work.
2013-10-29 12:58:31 PM
1 votes:

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: ph0rk: If you can't guess what "reverse commuter" means, subby isn't at the top of the list of people you should be mad at.

/not subby

Commuter - one who commutes to work

Reverse commuter - one who... commutes to home? doesn't commute at all?


If you can smell plastic melting, you're probably thinking too hard.

Also: http://lmgtfy.com/?q=reverse+commuter&l=1
2013-10-29 12:57:02 PM
1 votes:

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

Some people can't afford to live within a few miles of their workplace.


Recently moved from ~60 miles away from work to < 5. It's significantly more expensive, but man it's nice having free time again.
2013-10-29 12:56:58 PM
1 votes:

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

Some people can't afford to live within a few miles of their workplace.


I always assumed that living in the suburbs would be cheaper than living in the city, or you'd at least get more bang for your buck.
2013-10-29 12:55:14 PM
1 votes:

van1ty: I have a 90 minute commute one way every day.  Easily spend 120 bucks a week in gas.


An electric vehicle would pay for itself in short order. You're probably only driving 35 miles each way. Rapid charge when you get to work.
2013-10-29 12:49:32 PM
1 votes:
I drive from SF to the burbs about 20 miles. My commute would take exactly the same amount of time if reversed.
2013-10-29 12:48:42 PM
1 votes:
I did this when I lived in Memphis.  Had a house downtown on the river, but worked way out east.  It was great, because I was going against traffic every day, but living where the fun was, rather than vice versa.
2013-10-29 12:46:34 PM
1 votes:
I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.
2013-10-29 12:09:45 PM
1 votes:
Now write us a story about how hard those telecommuters have it
 
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