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(NPR)   More and more smug "reverse commuters" are learning that maybe they didn't think their cunning plan all the way through   (npr.org) divider line 244
    More: Amusing, slog, commuters, Deerfield, Metra  
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28800 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Oct 2013 at 12:45 PM (43 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-29 03:11:43 PM

quietwalker: "Nothing to do in the suburbs"

I keep seeing this phrase pop up when people defend living in the city, as if people who are burdened with a commute - traveling to the city - are somehow incapable of traveling to some place, I don't know where, and doing things.  Is it that suburbs are simply block-to-block residential districts , with no industry, manufacturing, commerce, entertainment, nothing but driveway and front lawn until you magically cross some threshold and you're "downtown", that also stop all travel except when you're going to work?

<sarcasm>Naw, they aren't biased at all.</sarcasm>

Look, there are some people that cherish a 'city life'.  I know folks who don't own driver's license, much less a car, have never used the stove in their apartment, and the only thing in their fridge is liquor, soda, and bottled water.  They parrot these things like badges of honor.  They enjoy the fact that they treat nearly 100% of their income as disposable, and despite the higher costs for food, housing, reliance on public transport, and a disproportionately larger part of their budget spent on entertainment.  Perhaps because they can go get drunk at bars and clubs and not have to drive home is enough to allow them to feel privileged and happy, even if it does mean paying yet more money for a taxi.  Though in retrospect, I've seen a lot of people throw up on a subway...

There are also people who enjoy living away from constant noise, people, and traffic, who actually like to look at the night sky and see stars instead of just reflections of neon and billboards off glass-fronted skyscrapers.  Folks who like being able to modify their house to suit their needs, to build a tree fort for their kids, to take a nice bike ride without having to suck exhaust and dodge both cars and people in a slow, lethal crawl.  Maybe they live minutes or less from a river or lake, a forest, a mountain, a baseball diamond, a soccer field, a playground, schools not covered in graf ...


Yeah, that is what I was kind of saying in my post. In the downtown of my little town north of New Orleans, there is a good Thai restaurant, a good Italian one, a oyster bar/fried seafood joint, a po-boy place justly famous for their roast-beef po-boys, a great coffee house (independent, not sbux), a tap room (bar/pub/thing), the main public library of the Parish (read County) system, a great little restaurant that does locavore/healthish stuff, a dive bar, two lunch breakfast cafes...

That is all without having to venture out of downtown and into strip-mall hell (this does surround the town) and this is a small town. It does help that it is the Parish/County seat and is an older small town. You don't have to go to the big city for fun.
 
2013-10-29 03:16:53 PM

BigNumber12: bdub77: With a picture of someone slogging through their terrible commute:

[media.npr.org image 850x476]
Nice brooch. Beats by Dre guy looks like he needs to shovel some more coffee into his mouth.

Metra seats face inward?! That's awkward.

/ Caltrain is better
// not the new cars, though


If you look closely, you'll see that's the upper level of a gallery coach; main level seats face fore/aft.

/Caltrain is peewee league compared to Metra
//rode Caltrain for years between SF and Hayward Park
 
2013-10-29 03:17:00 PM

WinoRhino: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

I bought a house out in the suburbs. I'm a 10 minute walk to the commuter rail into downtown Boston. 30 minute ride. I used to just hang out in town after work and then take a train home later in the evening. Best of both worlds.

Anyhow, the article amused me. I love it when people say they're "city people" but are annoyed about having to share roads and other public resources with a lot of other people.


Would like to point out here that the commuter rail is COMPLETELY different than the other public transportation here in Boston. My wife takes the Red Line from Quincy to Boston and most people on there are just complete trash with no manners or class. Every day she sees a pregnant woman or elderly person standing while a bunch of able bodied younger people pretend not to notice them. Of course you have the thugs, junkies and crazy homeless along for the ride too, what a nightmare.
 
2013-10-29 03:19:18 PM

dittybopper: NEPAman: What band were you on?

10 Meters.  It's been opening up consistently well for about a month or so now.

It's still the only HF band I have in the car.  The other two radios are a 6 Meter all-mode rig (Yaesu FT-690RII) and a 2 Meter FM only (Yaesu FT1900R).


Cool, I was able to make a string of 10-meter contacts from my apartment (ground level, single story unit) in downtown Fort Worth, including one to Argentina.  That one I was ecstatic about.  It demonstrated the fickle nature of 10 meters to me since most of my QSOs are to the northeast, Georgia/Florida, and west.  I do mostly digital work, JT65 and JT9.

Hope we can have a Fark QSO party again sometime soon!
 
2013-10-29 03:19:59 PM

kendelrio: For the record, I live ~140 miles from work. My commute takes 2 1/2-3 hours.

/but I only do it once a month.


Farks first congressman just got outed
 
2013-10-29 03:20:01 PM
I'm a double super secret reverse anti-commuter.  I live in the suburbs and work 4 minutes away from my home.  booya!
 
2013-10-29 03:23:20 PM

Smackledorfer: I'm a double super secret reverse anti-commuter.  I live in the suburbs and work 4 minutes away from my home.  booya!


SmackledorferFTW!!
 
2013-10-29 03:24:29 PM

Smackledorfer: I'm a double super secret reverse anti-commuter.  I live in the suburbs and work 4 minutes away from my home.  booya!


I'm a double super secret reverse hipster. I live in the coolest part of an urban setting and drive 20 miles to the strip mall hell hole to eat Applebee's! Booya!
 
2013-10-29 03:27:22 PM

Rex Kramer - Danger Seeker: WinoRhino: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

I bought a house out in the suburbs. I'm a 10 minute walk to the commuter rail into downtown Boston. 30 minute ride. I used to just hang out in town after work and then take a train home later in the evening. Best of both worlds.

Anyhow, the article amused me. I love it when people say they're "city people" but are annoyed about having to share roads and other public resources with a lot of other people.

Would like to point out here that the commuter rail is COMPLETELY different than the other public transportation here in Boston. My wife takes the Red Line from Quincy to Boston and most people on there are just complete trash with no manners or class. Every day she sees a pregnant woman or elderly person standing while a bunch of able bodied younger people pretend not to notice them. Of course you have the thugs, junkies and crazy homeless along for the ride too, what a nightmare.


Shockingly commuter rail in Philadelphia is generally classy and pleasant. I took it for about six months before moving to telecommuting (best commute ever), and I only dealt with one crazy person.

The schadenfreude of seeing others in traffic while you're going the other direction is great, until you realize you've left your work laptop at home and have to commute back in to get it, then back out.
 
2013-10-29 03:33:22 PM

LibertyHiller: If you look closely, you'll see that's the upper level of a gallery coach; main level seats face fore/aft.


No, I get it - it's the same basic single-lower/double-upper layout as Caltrain's old Nippon Sharyo stock. It's just strange that they have their upper deck seats oriented so that legs block the aisle. I'm sure that you can pack more people in that way, but what a farking nightmare for riders.
 
2013-10-29 03:34:30 PM

Rex Kramer - Danger Seeker: WinoRhino: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

I bought a house out in the suburbs. I'm a 10 minute walk to the commuter rail into downtown Boston. 30 minute ride. I used to just hang out in town after work and then take a train home later in the evening. Best of both worlds.

Anyhow, the article amused me. I love it when people say they're "city people" but are annoyed about having to share roads and other public resources with a lot of other people.

Would like to point out here that the commuter rail is COMPLETELY different than the other public transportation here in Boston. My wife takes the Red Line from Quincy to Boston and most people on there are just complete trash with no manners or class. Every day she sees a pregnant woman or elderly person standing while a bunch of able bodied younger people pretend not to notice them. Of course you have the thugs, junkies and crazy homeless along for the ride too, what a nightmare.


Not my experience.  I used to ride the Red Line every day and I saw people get up for older riders all the time.

Ever ride the commuter rail in the morning?  With all the dickheads that pretend to sleep in the two seaters so nobody sits next to them?  Or sit on the outside of a three seater and pretend to sleep?

There are douche bags everywhere.
 
2013-10-29 03:35:18 PM

trickymoo: I lived in downtown DC. farking terrible TERRIBLE traffic yeah? But I worked up in Greenbelt, MD. 20 Miles northeast of town.

Every single blessed morning, in the car, out the door and going 60 the whoooole way up the BW Parkway, just gloriously flipping off every sad sonofabiatch who was stuck in bumper to bumer on the other side of the road. It was possibly the greatest part of my day.

Hey, wanna take a guess what happened at 5 pm on my way home??? :-D MORE FLIPPAGGGEEE!!!!1!!!1!!! Took me 25 minutes to get home.

Suck it.


The world has treated you very poorly hasn't it trickeymoo? Do you want to talk about it?
 
2013-10-29 03:35:54 PM

The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.


How about feeling bad for someone who chose to work 4 miles from home, and whose multinational company spun off their division and sold it to a competitor (whose owner the CEO just happens to be friends with) whose office is 36 miles away? Oh yeah, and who can't get a job with a different competitor because the GOP's budget antics have thrown a huge wet blanket on our whole industry...

Because that's what happened to me. I didn't WANT a long commute and I found a job without one - only to get dicked over by business buddies of Mitt Romney (literally) and then have my options dry up while the Tea Party douchebags fark us up with the sequester then throw salt in the wound with the shutdown.

I'm just am trying to suck it up for the time being and hoping that next year folks will be hiring again in my industry.
 
2013-10-29 03:36:23 PM

Gunny Highway: There are douche bags everywhere.


So I dont sound like someone who is a hater of humanity; good, kind people far out weight them everywhere.

Every option has pros and cons.
 
2013-10-29 03:36:27 PM

dittybopper: drdank: Using an iambic keyer or a regular cw key?

I only use a straight key.  Here is my mobile set-up:

[i40.tinypic.com image 640x480]

Are you a ham?


Holy hell. As if it's not bad enough dealing with the farking texters on the road, now we have people like you dot-dashing away when they should be watching the road. What's next? Keeping a coop in the backseat to send messages via carrier pigeons? How about smoke signals from your radiator? Maybe jungle drums? Just boost your sub-woofer and you could let everyone know that you are an accident waiting to happen.

Hey, Western Union Man, keep your hands on the wheel or switch to Pony Express so the rest of us feel safer, OK?
 
2013-10-29 03:39:26 PM

pedobearapproved: Pilikia: First of all, what's described in the article hasn't been considered a "reverse" commute in Chicago since the 1980s. That train left the station decades ago, if you'll pardon the pun. Secondly, the Metra/UPRR is a fast, comfotable way to get to work and the people quoted in TFA should quit their farking whining. An hour each morning and evening where you can read a book or play Texas Hold'em on your iPad guilt-free? Who wouldn't want that?

2 hours a day? no, no thanks.


*shrug*

I both lived and worked in the city (just 5 miles from my job) my first 8 years in Chicago. I rode my bike, I walked, I took the El and the bus, I cabbed it, I drove, and all the various combinations thereof. Sometimes my commute was 15 minutes, sometimes it was 90 minutes; the maddening thing about it was the unpredictability. I was always early or late, and not just for work.

Now I live 17 miles from my office in the loop and my commute is 55 minutes door-to-door each way 99% of the time: 10 minute walk from house to train, 30 minute train ride, 15 minute walk from train to office.

Same train gets me downtown on weekends for shows and good eats, and serves as my designated driver after particularly drinky White Sox games.

So I ask again, what's not to like? The predictability of my commute allows me to be spontaneous with my social planning.
 
2013-10-29 03:48:19 PM
Is there even a reverse commute in Los Angeles?  I've been stuck on plenty of freeways (especially the 405 - pretty much most of the day - Mon - Fri) - where both directions are totally farked up.
 
2013-10-29 03:49:13 PM

van1ty: I have a 90 minute commute one way every day.  Easily spend 120 bucks a week in gas.


Personally, I would sooner kill myself.

My commute is, absolute worst case, 40 minutes one way. I have a bus with wifi I take most days though, and if I drive and aim to miss traffic the commute is more like 25 minutes on way. IMHO this is a long commute. 90 minutes is insanity.
 
2013-10-29 03:53:06 PM

mongbiohazard: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

How about feeling bad for someone who chose to work 4 miles from home, and whose multinational company spun off their division and sold it to a competitor (whose owner the CEO just happens to be friends with) whose office is 36 miles away? Oh yeah, and who can't get a job with a different competitor because the GOP's budget antics have thrown a huge wet blanket on our whole industry...

Because that's what happened to me. I didn't WANT a long commute and I found a job without one - only to get dicked over by business buddies of Mitt Romney (literally) and then have my options dry up while the Tea Party douchebags fark us up with the sequester then throw salt in the wound with the shutdown.

I'm just am trying to suck it up for the time being and hoping that next year folks will be hiring again in my industry.


Literally dicked by them?
 
2013-10-29 03:56:37 PM

YixilTesiphon: durbnpoisn: YixilTesiphon: durbnpoisn: But nowadays, my commute couldn't exactly be defined either way.  I drive through an urban area.  So for the 1st half, I get stuck in traffic, until I make it through Trenton.  Then I cross the bridge, and the traffic coming from PA is a gridlock trying to get to Trenton.

So what's the cool new term for that sort of commute?

Why the fark would you live in New Jersey if your job is in Pennsylvania? Spouse works in NYC?

Because try to sell a house in NJ.  We would lose so much money it's not even worth trying.

Can't even rent it out? I feel like at some point it must be worth it just to walk away from a mortgage. That's what my neighbors did - they spent $400k in 2006 on a house very similar to one I bought for $190k last year. Shortly after I bought they seem to have just signed it over to the bank.


Have you tried wearing clothes and closing the drapes? ;) I keed I keed.
 
2013-10-29 04:25:29 PM

Contents Under Pressure: I laugh a schadenfreudey laugh at all the people who moved to the suburbs to get away from the... um... and then discovered that what they ran away from followed them, because non-whites appreciate lower housing prices, too.


That's what housing covenants were for.  Then the damned legal system and them judges ruined a good thing.
 
2013-10-29 04:28:14 PM

SirEattonHogg: Is there even a reverse commute in Los Angeles?  I've been stuck on plenty of freeways (especially the 405 - pretty much most of the day - Mon - Fri) - where both directions are totally farked up.


I have a friend who's a prof at Harvey Mudd.  He and his wife live in Brentwood near her place of employment, though, and he does the reverse commute.
 
2013-10-29 04:34:51 PM

dittybopper: drdank: Using an iambic keyer or a regular cw key?

I only use a straight key.  Here is my mobile set-up:

[i40.tinypic.com image 640x480]

Are you a ham?


I may spend the rest of my days wondering what things I know nothing about are happening in the cars around me.
 
2013-10-29 04:51:53 PM
My commute goes from my bedroom to my home office, with stops at the bathroom and coffee maker. Never been so productive in my life.

Melissa Mayer can kiss my ass.
 
2013-10-29 05:09:52 PM

NEPAman: dittybopper: NEPAman: What band were you on?

10 Meters.  It's been opening up consistently well for about a month or so now.

It's still the only HF band I have in the car.  The other two radios are a 6 Meter all-mode rig (Yaesu FT-690RII) and a 2 Meter FM only (Yaesu FT1900R).

Cool, I was able to make a string of 10-meter contacts from my apartment (ground level, single story unit) in downtown Fort Worth, including one to Argentina.  That one I was ecstatic about.  It demonstrated the fickle nature of 10 meters to me since most of my QSOs are to the northeast, Georgia/Florida, and west.  I do mostly digital work, JT65 and JT9.

Hope we can have a Fark QSO party again sometime soon!


I'm taking my tech exam next month.   I can do the technical stuff in my sleep, but the lingo and the legalities over bandwidth assignment are screwing me up something bad.
 
2013-10-29 05:15:30 PM

listernine: kendelrio: For the record, I live ~140 miles from work. My commute takes 2 1/2-3 hours.

/but I only do it once a month.

Farks first congressman just got outed


Shhhhh! Don't tell!!
 
2013-10-29 06:16:22 PM

NEPAman: dittybopper: El Morro: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

Yeah... because it's just that easy.  You ass.

In any case, I had a 3 hour round trip commute for a while.  It was hell.   My condolences to those of you on that kind of grind. These days, if a song starts on the radio when I get in my car, it's still playing when I pull into the parking lot at my job.  It's tough to put into words just how wonderful a short commute is.  It's a quality of life issue, really.

Meh.

I spend 2 hours a day in my car, an hour to work in the morning, and an hour back home.

In the morning, traffic is light, and I either chat on the radio with my local ham radio buddies, or I listen to Morning Edition on NPR to catch up on the news.  On the ride home, I get on the long-range radio if propagation is there, or I listen to All Things Considered.

Just yesterday I spent most of my commute "talking" to Wayne N5YFC down near Baton Rouge, LA.  I put talking in quotes because we were using Morse.  Anyway, being able to talk to new and interesting people and places adds a bit of excitement to the commute.

The only time it's "brutal" is in the winter when I have to drive slow and it takes twice as long, and just occasionally when there is a particularly bad accident.

What band were you on?


You probably never heard of it...
 
2013-10-29 06:50:16 PM
Reverse commuting when Cookie rings the dinner bell ..

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-10-29 07:11:35 PM

HailRobonia: If you;'re a woman and live in the city but commute to the country for your cattle herding job, does that make you a reverse cowgirl?


End of thread
 
2013-10-29 07:30:53 PM
Wouldn't a reverse commute be you living at work and the work comes to you?  Like a shop owner with living space above, where all you got to do is open in the morning and the customers and deliveries come to you.  Think about it, it would still suck if you don't have any employees, you can't leave during business hours as you are trapped in the extension of your home.  Kind of like simply working at home, but with having to actually dress and behave professionally while having that trapped feeling.
 
2013-10-29 07:43:38 PM

BEER_ME_in_CT: I wish I was a city person, my commute would be almost zero. Unfortunately, I love to live out in the woods as far as possibly which equals a horrendous commute daily for me. Wish I could find a well paying job in the boonies. As soon as I do I will be alot happier. Why you would want to live in the city and commute out of it is beyond me.


Amen.
 
2013-10-29 07:44:28 PM
Is it really a reverse commute when 70% of the region's jobs are outside of the city core? Sounds like a normal commute.

/Reverse commuting in Houston was great until I had to do several months of night shift.
//Suburbs aren't so bad either
///things come in 3's
 
2013-10-29 08:39:44 PM

Rent Party: NEPAman: dittybopper: NEPAman: What band were you on?

10 Meters.  It's been opening up consistently well for about a month or so now.

It's still the only HF band I have in the car.  The other two radios are a 6 Meter all-mode rig (Yaesu FT-690RII) and a 2 Meter FM only (Yaesu FT1900R).

Cool, I was able to make a string of 10-meter contacts from my apartment (ground level, single story unit) in downtown Fort Worth, including one to Argentina.  That one I was ecstatic about.  It demonstrated the fickle nature of 10 meters to me since most of my QSOs are to the northeast, Georgia/Florida, and west.  I do mostly digital work, JT65 and JT9.

Hope we can have a Fark QSO party again sometime soon!

I'm taking my tech exam next month.   I can do the technical stuff in my sleep, but the lingo and the legalities over bandwidth assignment are screwing me up something bad.


I let my tech expire.  I got it back when code was still required.  I'm still surprised I passed that part of the test because I sucked at code (that's morse code for you non-hams).  The other part of the test was easy.
 
2013-10-29 08:50:46 PM

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


This.  It is about as retarded a term as reverse discrimination.  It "commuting" and "discrimination." No reverse about it.
 
2013-10-29 09:31:38 PM
I guess I have a forward-reverse commute since I drive from the suburbs, through the city, out past the far-side suburbs and out to BFE where my job is.
 
2013-10-29 10:22:55 PM

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


Came here to say this, only louder and with more swear words.
 
2013-10-29 10:48:28 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

Some people can't afford to live within a few miles of their workplace.


Maids, for example.
 
2013-10-29 10:56:05 PM

brantgoose: Reverse commuting sounds almost good to me. I've seen the highways during rush hour--backed up for blocks in one direction only with scarcely a car going the other way. If you're in the car going the other way, life is sweet, man!

It is not enough for that successful man that other people have to fail, they have to be seen to fail. To paraphrase a famous quip.

Mind you, I don't commute at all. I walk to and from work, 2.5 kilometers each way in roughly the time it would take to go by bus. Even better than driving past people stuck in a traffic jam--walking past people stuck in a traffic jam. But I try to avoid traffic altogether as I am a bit asthmatic and the smog makes me gag sometimes.

Even picking my way through the snow in other people's footprints is better than being jammed in a bus full of hot people in winter clothing that turns the air into something you'd expect in a laundry or in a mud room full of sweaters and mittens and wet boots.


This reminded me of this.

www.rtfa.net
Is that you with the walker?

I keed, I keed. You are one of my favorites. Always enjoy your posts.
 
2013-10-29 11:09:52 PM

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


Spoken like a true Reverse Racist, sir.
 
2013-10-29 11:43:16 PM

Rex Kramer - Danger Seeker: WinoRhino: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

I bought a house out in the suburbs. I'm a 10 minute walk to the commuter rail into downtown Boston. 30 minute ride. I used to just hang out in town after work and then take a train home later in the evening. Best of both worlds.

Anyhow, the article amused me. I love it when people say they're "city people" but are annoyed about having to share roads and other public resources with a lot of other people.

Would like to point out here that the commuter rail is COMPLETELY different than the other public transportation here in Boston. My wife takes the Red Line from Quincy to Boston and most people on there are just complete trash with no manners or class. Every day she sees a pregnant woman or elderly person standing while a bunch of able bodied younger people pretend not to notice them. Of course you have the thugs, junkies and crazy homeless along for the ride too, what a nightmare.


That sounds exactly like riding the Portland Max, except that there's more of a light urine smell. But you eventually get to recognize the usual Freaks of Portland at your stop like old, filthy friends, and embrace the concept of beautiful urban diversity and just take in the passing human comedy, and just laugh.

Because we're all stoned.
 
2013-10-30 12:05:14 AM

SirEattonHogg: Is there even a reverse commute in Los Angeles?  I've been stuck on plenty of freeways (especially the 405 - pretty much most of the day - Mon - Fri) - where both directions are totally farked up.


Los Angeles was the first metro to spread out so far that the jobs started following the suburbs. A lot of other big cities caught up in the 80's and 90's, like Chicago, and now it's pretty rare to find a big metro where reverse commute is a huge win. Some small cities still exist in a time warp where it's a slam dunk, though.
 
2013-10-30 04:21:27 AM

sure haven't: You're right, he should 'choose' to get a job at a labratory closer to his house. Say, right next door. That would be totally ideal. What a moron, right?


Well living where he does, any 'lab next door' isn't exactly hewing to state and local regulations.

The Ocho: Is it really a reverse commute when 70% of the region's jobs are outside of the city core? Sounds like a normal commute.


My take is in the period after the great exodus to the suburbs, businesses were often slow to follow, so every morning dad would get in the car and drive into work. Eventually businesses opened up outside the city cores which provided some an opportunity to commute in against the normal flow. Okay so now businesses have spread out enough that commuting is just one big cluster fark.

Big deal.

\Did the reverse commute from San Jose to Santa Cruz in the 80's.
\\Half hour commute vs an hour or more.
\\\Still brutal.
 
2013-10-30 08:39:33 AM

Rex Kramer - Danger Seeker: trickymoo: I lived in downtown DC. farking terrible TERRIBLE traffic yeah? But I worked up in Greenbelt, MD. 20 Miles northeast of town.

Every single blessed morning, in the car, out the door and going 60 the whoooole way up the BW Parkway, just gloriously flipping off every sad sonofabiatch who was stuck in bumper to bumer on the other side of the road. It was possibly the greatest part of my day.

Hey, wanna take a guess what happened at 5 pm on my way home??? :-D MORE FLIPPAGGGEEE!!!!1!!!1!!! Took me 25 minutes to get home.

Suck it.

The world has treated you very poorly hasn't it trickeymoo? Do you want to talk about it?


THE MAN ON THE METRO TOUCHED MY RAGE BUTTON.

NEVAR AGIN
 
2013-10-30 01:18:39 PM

KAzaMM: 4 mile commute. Less than ten minutes everyday. Have a nice day.


I walk three blocks. You have a nice day, too.
 
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