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(NPR)   More and more smug "reverse commuters" are learning that maybe they didn't think their cunning plan all the way through   (npr.org) divider line 244
    More: Amusing, slog, commuters, Deerfield, Metra  
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28800 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Oct 2013 at 12:45 PM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-29 01:39:50 PM

Cold_Sassy: Rapmaster2000: Cold_Sassy: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

Unless you happen to be a hiker or other type of nature lover.

Good point.  It takes me up to an hour to get to the mountains on Saturday.  If I lived in the burbs, it would only take 45 minutes.

I'm talking about doing it every day to decompress and exercise the dogs, not some hipster weekend hobby.


So what you're saying is, these hipsters just don't enjoy nature as authentically as you do.  For them, nature is just some casual hobby.  They're not out there living the real nature lifestyle like you are.  They're just a bunch of poseurs.

If only there were a name for people that looked down on others for not being sufficiently authentic.
 
2013-10-29 01:40:08 PM

bopis: Rent Party: Chicago is one of the few midwestern cities I'd move to, primarily because of the CTA.  I love those trains, and it's a great town.

I used to love the CTA until I had to use it everyday.


I just spent a week in Oak Park, and rode the green line into the city center and back every day.  All I could think was "man, I could do this every day."

What happens if you do that every day for months on end?
 
2013-10-29 01:40:32 PM

YixilTesiphon: durbnpoisn: But nowadays, my commute couldn't exactly be defined either way.  I drive through an urban area.  So for the 1st half, I get stuck in traffic, until I make it through Trenton.  Then I cross the bridge, and the traffic coming from PA is a gridlock trying to get to Trenton.

So what's the cool new term for that sort of commute?

Why the fark would you live in New Jersey if your job is in Pennsylvania? Spouse works in NYC?


Because try to sell a house in NJ.  We would lose so much money it's not even worth trying.
 
2013-10-29 01:40:37 PM

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


Depending on where you live there can be a huge difference in your commute depending on which direction you go. For example I have a "reverse commute" - I have minimal traffic and unrestricted roads because I'm commuting out of the city while everyone else is commuting in. If my commute went the other way my travel time would easily double and the highway section would be off limits to me due to HOV restrictions during commuting hours.
 
2013-10-29 01:40:38 PM
Remember this: this guy's 35-mile one way commute is long for forward or reverse commute. I will add that this guy has to be in the northern part of the city, as far from Argonne as possible.  He is more than reverse commuting, he is going all the way through the city.  Chicago's highways are always busy, but way worse in the peak direction.
 
2013-10-29 01:41:13 PM

jackiepaper: I drive from SF to the burbs about 20 miles. My commute would take exactly the same amount of time if reversed.


I'm just curious what qualifies as the burbs of SF?

Are we talking South SF or are we talking Burlingame/San Mateo?
 
2013-10-29 01:41:19 PM

Jim_Callahan: Wouldn't a reverse commute be driving away from work at the start of the work-day, then returning to work at the end of the work-day, i.e. the night shift?

This is just a normal commute, the destination being in the suburbs doesn't actually make it not a commute.


That's exactly what I was thinking when I heard reverse commuters...
 
2013-10-29 01:41:44 PM

paygun: You have to admit, "reverse commuting" does sound a lot better than "fark the environment."


??? It's no different, environment-wise, than driving from the country to the city daily.
 
2013-10-29 01:42:09 PM
I commute from my bedroom to my living room, with one stop in the kitchen for coffee. Some days I reverse commute from the living room back to the bedroom for a lunchtime nap.

/smug telecommuter
 
2013-10-29 01:44:17 PM

HailRobonia: For me, time-wise, public transportation makes sense.


I wish it was even a half-arsed compromise for me; I'd rather not deal with traffic. It would take me twice as long by bus, and the only trains near my house are freight trains. A 20 minute highway drive on a quiet day becomes a 45 minute commute on side roads and an hour-and-a-half-plus bus ride.

If public transportation is communism, call me "Red" and send Joe McCarthy my dossier.
 
2013-10-29 01:45:19 PM

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


It's like "reverse racism", there's no such thing. Racism is racism no matter which race it is targeting.
 
2013-10-29 01:45:25 PM
This was something to be smug about?!?!?

I did this for years, and never was smug about it!!!! I missed out, because I've moved closer to work.

Oh well, I can be smug about living 1.5 miles from work and around the corner from a grocery store and kick ass Mexican restaurant now.
 
2013-10-29 01:45:26 PM
The other morning I hit snooze a few too many times and overslept.  My son woke me, and I looked at my phone and saw it was 7:42.  I still made it to work by 8:00, even with stopping to put the trash on the curb.  Being able to go home and eat lunch with my family every day is nice too.
 
2013-10-29 01:45:27 PM
--> It's almost as if  living a long distance away , from where you work, is a hassle .

i2.kym-cdn.com
 
2013-10-29 01:46:44 PM
I live like 3 miles from work, I probably burn less gas than you no matter how fuel efficient your ride.
 
2013-10-29 01:48:59 PM
So happy to work at home.

/walks away feelin' smug.
 
2013-10-29 01:49:25 PM

Rapmaster2000: Cold_Sassy: Rapmaster2000: Cold_Sassy: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

Unless you happen to be a hiker or other type of nature lover.

Good point.  It takes me up to an hour to get to the mountains on Saturday.  If I lived in the burbs, it would only take 45 minutes.

I'm talking about doing it every day to decompress and exercise the dogs, not some hipster weekend hobby.

So what you're saying is, these hipsters just don't enjoy nature as authentically as you do.  For them, nature is just some casual hobby.  They're not out there living the real nature lifestyle like you are.  They're just a bunch of poseurs.

If only there were a name for people that looked down on others for not being sufficiently authentic.


Not necessarily,  all I am saying is that I do it EVERY day by choice and you do it on Saturdays.  If you like it so much, why do you live in the city?
 
2013-10-29 01:50:28 PM

Ambivalence: nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.

It's like "reverse racism", there's no such thing. Racism is racism no matter which race it is targeting.


I have the same issue with the prefix "pre"

Useless prefix is useless.
 
2013-10-29 01:51:32 PM

Cold_Sassy: Not necessarily,  all I am saying is that I do it EVERY day by choice and you do it on Saturdays.  If you like it so much, why do you live in the city?


This just in: Human beings tend to have varied interests. More at 11.
 
2013-10-29 01:51:40 PM

usafdave: Profit.

6 miles... all on the greenbelt so I don't douche it up by riding in the ROAD and disobeying traffic laws.

/ducks


No worries man, I've been biking to work for 17 years now.

And yes, I'm a professional and I dress up (i.e. not bike clothes) for work.
 
2013-10-29 01:51:45 PM
The DC suburbs of 20 years ago want their news story back.

/seriously, this is not news
//but NPR only writes for old people and hipsters
 
2013-10-29 01:51:50 PM
I live in downtown St. Pete, work in Tampa.  Kind of stupid, but you couldn't pay me to live in Tampa.
 
2013-10-29 01:52:15 PM
I can't believe how many people can't grasp the term "reverse commute."

Imagine it this way: during morning rush hour, if you looked at a highway, you'd likely see bumper-to-bumper traffic headed from the suburbs to the city, and lighter traffic headed away from the city.  On the subway, you'd have people packed in like sardines from the outlying areas to the city center, but once the trains leave the city center, it's easy to get a seat.

Having a term for reverse commuting (in my experience) is a way of saying that you don't have to put up with all the bullshiat that comes from rush hour, because you're going in the opposite direction of the normal flow of people.

The article is saying that the flow is evening out (at least in Chicago), because more jobs are opening up in the suburbs, while living in the city is becoming more attractive, so all the reverse commuters who thought they had such a good deal aren't getting a better commute than traditional commuters.
 
2013-10-29 01:54:05 PM
I laugh a schadenfreudey laugh at all the people who moved to the suburbs to get away from the... um... and then discovered that what they ran away from followed them, because non-whites appreciate lower housing prices, too.
 
2013-10-29 01:54:28 PM

The Lone Gunman: So by "reverse commuters" you mean...commuters.


I thought this was "coming to work at 5, going home at 9", not "commuting"...
 
2013-10-29 01:55:10 PM
The reverse commute glory is alive and well in Milwaukee.  Took me 20 minutes to traverse 14 miles.  And really, about a third of that was spent sitting at stoplights making my way over to the interstate.

Would I prefer to just have a downtown job and bus or take the bike?  You bet.  But one can't be too picky about location when you're a recent college grad trying to get a job in Wisconsin.  I'll pay the extra travel cost for the vastly superior entertainment and cultural life found in the city.
 
2013-10-29 01:55:50 PM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: StopLurkListen: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: That's what keeps Kathy LeVeque, 31, in Chicago, too. "I'm a city person," she says.

Then get a city job.

Yes, jobs are plentiful and everywhere and are all the same and equally good and appropriate. Jobs are also secure and not at all volatile and you can count on being in the same job until you retire so base your long-term home location decisions on the job you have right at this very moment.

Then I guess they should be happy they have a job at all, and quit biatching about the commute.


Pretty much this.
 
2013-10-29 01:59:33 PM

HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.


Sure, then also tell employers to stop relocating to wherever they can get a tax break instead of where large numbers of people live.
 
2013-10-29 02:00:04 PM
Cold_Sassy:

Not necessarily,  all I am saying is that I do it EVERY day

Uh huh.
 
2013-10-29 02:00:57 PM

Contents Under Pressure: I laugh a schadenfreudey laugh at all the people who moved to the suburbs to get away from the... um... and then discovered that what they ran away from followed them, because non-whites appreciate lower housing prices, too.


Who are these people?
 
2013-10-29 02:01:29 PM

durbnpoisn: YixilTesiphon: durbnpoisn: But nowadays, my commute couldn't exactly be defined either way.  I drive through an urban area.  So for the 1st half, I get stuck in traffic, until I make it through Trenton.  Then I cross the bridge, and the traffic coming from PA is a gridlock trying to get to Trenton.

So what's the cool new term for that sort of commute?

Why the fark would you live in New Jersey if your job is in Pennsylvania? Spouse works in NYC?

Because try to sell a house in NJ.  We would lose so much money it's not even worth trying.


Can't even rent it out? I feel like at some point it must be worth it just to walk away from a mortgage. That's what my neighbors did - they spent $400k in 2006 on a house very similar to one I bought for $190k last year. Shortly after I bought they seem to have just signed it over to the bank.
 
2013-10-29 02:01:31 PM
I have a wonderful reverse commute now, just under 10 miles and 15 minutes each way. I get a great view of the people jammed up on the other side of the divided highway twice a day. In seven months, I've had no morning delays and only two evening delays, both which were solved by an alternate route adding only 5 minutes to the trip. I love it!
 
2013-10-29 02:01:45 PM
I used to fark this chick that caught the same morning bus as me.

/she was ugly.
 
2013-10-29 02:01:57 PM
This guy hasn't seen the reverse commute traffic jam on I-66 inside the beltway. Thanks to the HOV restrictions, me and my fake hybrid cruise into DC while all the reverse commuters sit backed up. It doesn't help that the worst stretch of road is the part in Fairfax county. The inbound part has extra lanes open, and is still a nightmare because Virginians can merge drive or plan a road network that doesn't have people using an interstate to go less than 2 miles. The outbound lanes are slightly better out there, but aren't great. The afternoon rush 6 hours are awful in both directions.
 
2013-10-29 02:02:03 PM

odinsposse: Disaster Transport: Actually, the crappy commute in the Chicago area is the suburb-to-suburb, east - west commute. It took at least 50+ minutes for me to get to my old job, 22 miles away. I would have loved to take the train, but the train system is just radial in and out of the city, so that meant one 55 minute ride into the city and another 45 minute ride out to the other suburb. Until we accept that people need mass transit from suburb to suburb it will continue to be a problem. I will never ever take another job that's over a 30 minute commute ever again, even if trains are an option. I miss quality time a home too much.

/new job is much closer
//traffic makes people crazy
///slashies crazy

Or we could, you know, not keep trying to build out suburbs farther and farther away from everything. It just isn't feasible to have a mass transit system that keeps up that well with urban sprawl. And since we have a bunch of empty space that's already well connected that would be a better avenue for development.


In the case of Chicago about 40% of the city is livable; in other words, 40% of the city has gangs that are smart enough to not kill the golden goose (working class/middle class/upper middle class people that buy drugs). The rest of the city is plagued with abandoned buildings and empty lots.

The suburbs are sort of cheaper to live in. However, there is nothing to do out there and it is more expensive to live out there than you would think. A big part of the cost is property taxes, which are lower in the city than the better suburbs because the suburbs have a smaller tax base. Chicago has all those commercial high rises throwing tons of money into the city treasury and the condo buildings which bring in a lot of money per lot. So, the tax burden of a single property owner is less than say Downers Grove or Evanston.

Another hidden cost in the suburbs is the cost of a car. Not only gas, but also maintenance,etc. Even if you have a car in the city, the overall cost is lower because it is used so much less.

The biggest advantage of living in the city, in my opinion, is the opportunity for exercise. I can walk anywhere I need to go. Grocery store? 10 minute walk. The park? 4 minute walk. A bar? 3 minute walk. A bunch of specialty stores and restaurants? 5 minute walk. I can also jog in the park or bicycle on the bike trail. All of those little walks add up!

I also have a 20 minute commute to work downtown, door to door, and could walk the 2 miles to work if I had to. I think the urban renaissance that some large cities are having will continue and we will see places like the west and south sides of chicago gentrify in the next 30 years or so as the holdouts age and die, and as the younger people are dispersed throughout the state to other communities, including the suburbs. I think that the land is simply too valuable to be abandoned. Detroit is screwed though.
 
2013-10-29 02:02:39 PM
I commute opposite of traffic which is fine but I live in a small city so my commute ranges from 8 minutes (4 am no traffic all flashing reds) to 15 minutes (peak rush hour with slow bridge). I once took half an hour to get home and just about took a sick day the next day.

The big thing here is to move on the east side of the city. There's a large naval base in the city so it was obviously targeted by the reds so nobody lived down wind. Property values were really low over there. That's started to shift so you can get reasonable places out on that side. I could be burying a hooker deep in the woods and be at work in under half an hour. Convenient.
 
2013-10-29 02:06:05 PM
My house and job are in the suburbs, so I subcommute.
 
2013-10-29 02:06:48 PM

hausman007: This guy hasn't seen the reverse commute traffic jam on I-66 inside the beltway. Thanks to the HOV restrictions, me and my fake hybrid cruise into DC while all the reverse commuters sit backed up. It doesn't help that the worst stretch of road is the part in Fairfax county. The inbound part has extra lanes open, and is still a nightmare because Virginians can merge drive or plan a road network that doesn't have people using an interstate to go less than 2 miles. The outbound lanes are slightly better out there, but aren't great. The afternoon rush 6 hours are awful in both directions.


I66 is awful, I avoid if at all possible regardless of day or time. I'm a little northwest of you, reverse commuting on 28 and 7.
 
2013-10-29 02:08:11 PM
Why are they talking about 6am as if it's some ungodly early hour for a human to have to endure? Something tells me young creative media major writing this has never had a real job.
 
2013-10-29 02:08:23 PM

meat0918: This was something to be smug about?!?!?



Not in tfa as far as I could tell. I didn't see anyone acting particularly smug about living in Chicago, just a little matter-of-fact 'I like living in a big city'. I think submitter was imagining things again.
 
2013-10-29 02:08:49 PM

Gunny Highway: Contents Under Pressure: I laugh a schadenfreudey laugh at all the people who moved to the suburbs to get away from the... um... and then discovered that what they ran away from followed them, because non-whites appreciate lower housing prices, too.

Who are these people?


Take DC for example. The history of virtually every neighborhood is:

"The neighborhood was a prosperous working/middle class white neighborhood until 19XX when some black families managed to get together enough money to buy some houses there. Over the next decade the neighborhood declined into a poor predominately black neighborhood, where it remained until recent gentrification due to young professionals seeking housing closer to work and amenities"
 
2013-10-29 02:09:45 PM
I lived in downtown DC. farking terrible TERRIBLE traffic yeah? But I worked up in Greenbelt, MD. 20 Miles northeast of town.

Every single blessed morning, in the car, out the door and going 60 the whoooole way up the BW Parkway, just gloriously flipping off every sad sonofabiatch who was stuck in bumper to bumer on the other side of the road. It was possibly the greatest part of my day.

Hey, wanna take a guess what happened at 5 pm on my way home??? :-D MORE FLIPPAGGGEEE!!!!1!!!1!!! Took me 25 minutes to get home.

Suck it.
 
2013-10-29 02:12:16 PM

lordargent: My area, in a nutshell.

Commuting: Live where the property is affordable, commute to work (an area where property is expensive and salaries are higher).

VS

Reverse Commuting: Live where the property is expensive, commute to work (an area where property is cheaper and salaries are lower).

[synapticnulship.com image 425x340]


Uh.  This.  I work in DC.  For the federal government.  And not as a contractor.  Which means I can't afford to live anywhere within a 30 mile radius of the DC border without living in total squalor.

If I worked in the suburbs where my home is, I'd be making at least $15k less annually.  And then wouldn't be able to afford my home.

And in the DC Metro area, it doesn't matter if you're going in to or out of DC, all ten rush hours per day suck.
 
2013-10-29 02:12:31 PM

Target Builder: Gunny Highway: Contents Under Pressure: I laugh a schadenfreudey laugh at all the people who moved to the suburbs to get away from the... um... and then discovered that what they ran away from followed them, because non-whites appreciate lower housing prices, too.

Who are these people?

Take DC for example. The history of virtually every neighborhood is:

"The neighborhood was a prosperous working/middle class white neighborhood until 19XX when some black families managed to get together enough money to buy some houses there. Over the next decade the neighborhood declined into a poor predominately black neighborhood, where it remained until recent gentrification due to young professionals seeking housing closer to work and amenities"


Where does racism fit in?
 
2013-10-29 02:13:23 PM
I work from home. My commute is under thirty seconds. I laugh at you all.
 
2013-10-29 02:14:03 PM

aerojockey: I have a 30 minute commute for a 20 mile drive on the goddamn 405.

/smug smog


FTFY
 
2013-10-29 02:14:06 PM
I work in my garage. I can't drive there though. There's nowhere to park.
 
2013-10-29 02:15:28 PM
Honestly I wish that I could have a shorter commute and I'd maybe even consider living in a suburb- if they all didn't have just as much obnoxious traffic as the downtown area does, AND more tourists around them, but with nothing that I find entertaining. I am so not a theme park person, despite working at one.

I really need to move out of Orlando... but I worked so hard to get my job and I really like it so commute it is. At least I like living downtown but one day 1-4 is going to kill me.
 
2013-10-29 02:15:48 PM

WhiskeyBoy: lordargent: My area, in a nutshell.

Commuting: Live where the property is affordable, commute to work (an area where property is expensive and salaries are higher).

VS

Reverse Commuting: Live where the property is expensive, commute to work (an area where property is cheaper and salaries are lower).

[synapticnulship.com image 425x340]

Uh.  This.  I work in DC.  For the federal government.  And not as a contractor.  Which means I can't afford to live anywhere within a 30 mile radius of the DC border without living in total squalor.

If I worked in the suburbs where my home is, I'd be making at least $15k less annually.  And then wouldn't be able to afford my home.

And in the DC Metro area, it doesn't matter if you're going in to or out of DC, all ten rush hours per day suck.


I got lucky and found a townhouse that's only 25 miles from DC and only costs 2 weeks take home pay for the mortgage. It is in a real neighborhood though with sidewalks and street lights which are both things VA has failed to figure out.
 
2013-10-29 02:17:45 PM
It's real simple people, move to were you work.  If that means a cheap apartment instead of a giant mortgage, oh well. BTW you're insane to buy anything less than several acres anyway, because if you buy land you can build a shop or grow a cashcrop - something to make the land pay for itself.  A "house" is just a never ending series of expenses culminating in a market crash where you end up owing more than  it can be sold for.
 
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