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(NPR)   More and more smug "reverse commuters" are learning that maybe they didn't think their cunning plan all the way through   (npr.org) divider line 244
    More: Amusing, slog, commuters, Deerfield, Metra  
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28786 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Oct 2013 at 12:45 PM (24 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



244 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-10-29 11:51:57 AM
With a picture of someone slogging through their terrible commute:

media.npr.org
Nice brooch. Beats by Dre guy looks like he needs to shovel some more coffee into his mouth.
 
2013-10-29 12:09:45 PM
Now write us a story about how hard those telecommuters have it
 
2013-10-29 12:12:50 PM

unlikely: Now write us a story about how hard those telecommuters have it


Pffft, telecommuters. That buncha candy-asses couldn't begin to handle the travails of the independently wealthy.
 
2013-10-29 12:25:32 PM
Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.
 
2013-10-29 12:26:11 PM
It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.
 
2013-10-29 12:46:34 PM
I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.
 
2013-10-29 12:46:53 PM
Kept reading his name as Brix, Hans Brix.

/so ronery
 
2013-10-29 12:47:57 PM
So they drive to work in reverse? That seems needlessly dangerous.
 
2013-10-29 12:48:42 PM
I did this when I lived in Memphis.  Had a house downtown on the river, but worked way out east.  It was great, because I was going against traffic every day, but living where the fun was, rather than vice versa.
 
2013-10-29 12:49:32 PM
I drive from SF to the burbs about 20 miles. My commute would take exactly the same amount of time if reversed.
 
2013-10-29 12:50:18 PM
So by "reverse commuters" you mean...commuters.
 
2013-10-29 12:50:21 PM
Wouldn't a reverse commute be driving away from work at the start of the work-day, then returning to work at the end of the work-day, i.e. the night shift?

This is just a normal commute, the destination being in the suburbs doesn't actually make it not a commute.
 
2013-10-29 12:51:41 PM

The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.


This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.
 
2013-10-29 12:51:46 PM

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


Don't be thick.

It used to be that people commuted in from the suburbs to jobs in the city.  The other way during rush hour generally saw lighter traffic.

Apparently that is not the case any more.
 
2013-10-29 12:52:19 PM

The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.


You're right, he should 'choose' to get a job at a labratory closer to his house. Say, right next door. That would be totally ideal. What a moron, right?
 
2013-10-29 12:52:33 PM
I have a 90 minute commute one way every day.  Easily spend 120 bucks a week in gas.
 
2013-10-29 12:52:35 PM
That's what keeps Kathy LeVeque, 31, in Chicago, too. "I'm a city person," she says.

Then get a city job.
 
2013-10-29 12:52:53 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: So they drive to work in reverse? That seems needlessly dangerous.


i1.ytimg.com


WRONG
 
2013-10-29 12:53:04 PM

HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.


Some people can't afford to live within a few miles of their workplace.
 
2013-10-29 12:53:41 PM
Reverse commuting sounds almost good to me. I've seen the highways during rush hour--backed up for blocks in one direction only with scarcely a car going the other way. If you're in the car going the other way, life is sweet, man!

It is not enough for that successful man that other people have to fail, they have to be seen to fail. To paraphrase a famous quip.

Mind you, I don't commute at all. I walk to and from work, 2.5 kilometers each way in roughly the time it would take to go by bus. Even better than driving past people stuck in a traffic jam--walking past people stuck in a traffic jam. But I try to avoid traffic altogether as I am a bit asthmatic and the smog makes me gag sometimes.

Even picking my way through the snow in other people's footprints is better than being jammed in a bus full of hot people in winter clothing that turns the air into something you'd expect in a laundry or in a mud room full of sweaters and mittens and wet boots.
 
2013-10-29 12:53:55 PM

LandOfChocolate: nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.

Don't be thick.

It used to be that people commuted in from the suburbs to jobs in the city.  The other way during rush hour generally saw lighter traffic.

Apparently that is not the case any more.


Isn't that good, though? If both directions are getting equal use that's way more efficient than everybody trying to go one way.
 
2013-10-29 12:54:04 PM
If you can't guess what "reverse commuter" means, subby isn't at the top of the list of people you should be mad at.

/not subby
 
2013-10-29 12:54:56 PM
yup, I live z2, work z5. it's ACE.
 
2013-10-29 12:55:14 PM

van1ty: I have a 90 minute commute one way every day.  Easily spend 120 bucks a week in gas.


An electric vehicle would pay for itself in short order. You're probably only driving 35 miles each way. Rapid charge when you get to work.
 
2013-10-29 12:55:50 PM

ph0rk: If you can't guess what "reverse commuter" means, subby isn't at the top of the list of people you should be mad at.

/not subby


Commuter - one who commutes to work

Reverse commuter - one who... commutes to home? doesn't commute at all?
 
2013-10-29 12:56:45 PM

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


Pretty sure "reverse" and "community" aren't made-up words.

/i keed
 
2013-10-29 12:56:57 PM
I still feel pretty smug when I'm going 80 mph while the other side of the highway is a parking lot for 15+ miles.

media.nowpublic.net

Regardless, all of the suburbs is a traffic jam now.  My coworkers live closer to the office than I do and their commutes are twice as long.  When I ask why they don't move closer to the office (because to me a suburb is a suburb as I'm sure the city is the city to them) they say it's because in the suburb around the office the houses aren't big enough for your money.  One dude just bought a 5500 sq ft house for a family of four.  I get it that $400k is a pretty good price for all of that sq. footage.  I can't say a 15 mile, one hour commute makes that worth it.
 
2013-10-29 12:56:58 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

Some people can't afford to live within a few miles of their workplace.


I always assumed that living in the suburbs would be cheaper than living in the city, or you'd at least get more bang for your buck.
 
2013-10-29 12:57:02 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

Some people can't afford to live within a few miles of their workplace.


Recently moved from ~60 miles away from work to < 5. It's significantly more expensive, but man it's nice having free time again.
 
2013-10-29 12:57:38 PM
Chicago is one of the few midwestern cities I'd move to, primarily because of the CTA.  I love those trains, and it's a great town.
 
2013-10-29 12:57:48 PM

The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.


I work 35 miles from where I live.  It's a 40 minute commute.  35 if you speed.
 
2013-10-29 12:58:31 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: ph0rk: If you can't guess what "reverse commuter" means, subby isn't at the top of the list of people you should be mad at.

/not subby

Commuter - one who commutes to work

Reverse commuter - one who... commutes to home? doesn't commute at all?


If you can smell plastic melting, you're probably thinking too hard.

Also: http://lmgtfy.com/?q=reverse+commuter&l=1
 
2013-10-29 12:58:39 PM
This is why I love my commute. It is about 15 miles, In the morning, the worst traffic is in the other direction. Cruising along at 65MPH. In the evening, the traffic sucks in both directions, though.
 
2013-10-29 12:59:27 PM
I'd fix it, but a non-click lmgtfy link satisfies my desire for irony.
 
2013-10-29 12:59:44 PM

HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.


Yeah... because it's just that easy.  You ass.

In any case, I had a 3 hour round trip commute for a while.  It was hell.   My condolences to those of you on that kind of grind. These days, if a song starts on the radio when I get in my car, it's still playing when I pull into the parking lot at my job.  It's tough to put into words just how wonderful a short commute is.  It's a quality of life issue, really.
 
2013-10-29 12:59:46 PM

Jim_Callahan: Wouldn't a reverse commute be driving away from work at the start of the work-day, then returning to work at the end of the work-day, i.e. the night shift?

This is just a normal commute, the destination being in the suburbs doesn't actually make it not a commute.


This.  Your commute is scalar, not a vector.
 
2013-10-29 01:00:04 PM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: That's what keeps Kathy LeVeque, 31, in Chicago, too. "I'm a city person," she says.

Then get a city job.


Yes, jobs are plentiful and everywhere and are all the same and equally good and appropriate. Jobs are also secure and not at all volatile and you can count on being in the same job until you retire so base your long-term home location decisions on the job you have right at this very moment.
 
2013-10-29 01:00:10 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: ph0rk: If you can't guess what "reverse commuter" means, subby isn't at the top of the list of people you should be mad at.

/not subby

Commuter - one who commutes to work

Reverse commuter - one who... commutes to home? doesn't commute at all?


Yeah, and why is the postman always disgruntled.  Have you ever heard of a gruntled postman?  Also, what's the deal with airline food.
 
2013-10-29 01:00:14 PM
I love my commute.  Two 30-40 minute train rides a day  allow me to listen to podcasts, music, or read.  All that said, I really miss driving to work.
 
2013-10-29 01:00:30 PM
If you;'re a woman and live in the city but commute to the country for your cattle herding job, does that make you a reverse cowgirl?
 
2013-10-29 01:01:39 PM

van1ty: I have a 90 minute commute one way every day.  Easily spend 120 bucks a week in gas.


I also have a slow commute and used to do it in a mustang.  Bought a Prius C -- it has a gas and electric engine -- basic model is under 20k and I get 53 mpg.  What you save in gas would cover the payments.
 
2013-10-29 01:01:56 PM
My area, in a nutshell.

Commuting: Live where the property is affordable, commute to work (an area where property is expensive and salaries are higher).

VS

Reverse Commuting: Live where the property is expensive, commute to work (an area where property is cheaper and salaries are lower).

synapticnulship.com
 
2013-10-29 01:01:56 PM
Actually, the crappy commute in the Chicago area is the suburb-to-suburb, east - west commute. It took at least 50+ minutes for me to get to my old job, 22 miles away. I would have loved to take the train, but the train system is just radial in and out of the city, so that meant one 55 minute ride into the city and another 45 minute ride out to the other suburb. Until we accept that people need mass transit from suburb to suburb it will continue to be a problem. I will never ever take another job that's over a 30 minute commute ever again, even if trains are an option. I miss quality time a home too much.

/new job is much closer
//traffic makes people crazy
///slashies crazy
 
2013-10-29 01:02:21 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

Some people can't afford to live within a few miles of their workplace.


The guy in TFA lives in Chicago and commutes to the 'burbs.  Unless he lives in a really rough neighborhood in Chicago, the suburbs are going to be around the same price, if not  cheaper.  Remember, people went to the suburbs in the first place because land is cheaper than in the city.  The people choosing to live in the city (and commute to the suburbs) aren't doing it to save money, they're doing it because they like the social/cultural aspects of the city better.  And it's fine if they want to make that choice, but don't cry about your commute when it's a lifestyle choice.

I recognize that not being able to afford to move is an issue for some people, but it's hardly the only reason people commute.  People might choose to live in different places for social reasons (or to get away from minorities in certain cases, if we're being honest), or to have perceived better schools for their kids, or to be able to afford more land on the same salary, etc.   I have all the sympathy in the world for people who are forced into commuting based on where they can afford to live, but minimal sympathy for people who choose a long commute.
 
2013-10-29 01:03:51 PM
it can take 45 minutes to two hours to get to and from work

Nice culture you have there.
 
2013-10-29 01:04:12 PM

Gunny Highway: I love my commute.  Two 30-40 minute train rides a day  allow me to listen to podcasts, music, or read.  All that said, I really miss driving to work.


For me, time-wise, public transportation makes sense. But the big problem with public transportation is the public. It's hard to relax and enjoy my commute when we're all crammed into a train like cattle, surrounded by jerk-ass people who won't move further into the car, stink, cough and sneeze all over the place, jam you in the back with their over-sized purses, smash you with their giant backpacks, and other assorted unpleasantness.
 
2013-10-29 01:04:29 PM

HailRobonia: If you;'re a woman and live in the city but commute to the country for your cattle herding job, does that make you a reverse cowgirl?


I lol'd
 
2013-10-29 01:04:38 PM

Rent Party: Chicago is one of the few midwestern cities I'd move to, primarily because of the CTA.  I love those trains, and it's a great town.


I used to love the CTA until I had to use it everyday.

The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live is'nt me.


FTFY
 
2013-10-29 01:05:47 PM
I wish I was a city person, my commute would be almost zero. Unfortunately, I love to live out in the woods as far as possibly which equals a horrendous commute daily for me. Wish I could find a well paying job in the boonies. As soon as I do I will be alot happier. Why you would want to live in the city and commute out of it is beyond me.
 
2013-10-29 01:05:50 PM

El Morro: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

Yeah... because it's just that easy.  You ass.

In any case, I had a 3 hour round trip commute for a while.  It was hell.   My condolences to those of you on that kind of grind. These days, if a song starts on the radio when I get in my car, it's still playing when I pull into the parking lot at my job.  It's tough to put into words just how wonderful a short commute is.  It's a quality of life issue, really.


Meh.

I spend 2 hours a day in my car, an hour to work in the morning, and an hour back home.

In the morning, traffic is light, and I either chat on the radio with my local ham radio buddies, or I listen to Morning Edition on NPR to catch up on the news.  On the ride home, I get on the long-range radio if propagation is there, or I listen to All Things Considered.

Just yesterday I spent most of my commute "talking" to Wayne N5YFC down near Baton Rouge, LA.  I put talking in quotes because we were using Morse.  Anyway, being able to talk to new and interesting people and places adds a bit of excitement to the commute.

The only time it's "brutal" is in the winter when I have to drive slow and it takes twice as long, and just occasionally when there is a particularly bad accident.
 
2013-10-29 01:06:01 PM
So instead of a long drive from home to work, they have a long drive from work to home?
 
2013-10-29 01:06:42 PM
Obama is diligently working on this. Over the next few years only people in D.C. and northeast Virginia will have jobs to commute to.
 
2013-10-29 01:06:53 PM
Doesn't their neck get sore!?!?
 
2013-10-29 01:07:08 PM
For the record, I live ~140 miles from work. My commute takes 2 1/2-3 hours.

/but I only do it once a month.
 
2013-10-29 01:07:09 PM

StopLurkListen: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: That's what keeps Kathy LeVeque, 31, in Chicago, too. "I'm a city person," she says.

Then get a city job.

Yes, jobs are plentiful and everywhere and are all the same and equally good and appropriate. Jobs are also secure and not at all volatile and you can count on being in the same job until you retire so base your long-term home location decisions on the job you have right at this very moment.


Then I guess they should be happy they have a job at all, and quit biatching about the commute.
 
2013-10-29 01:07:20 PM
4 mile commute. Less than ten minutes everyday. Have a nice day.
 
2013-10-29 01:07:24 PM

unlikely: Now write us a story about how hard those telecommuters have it


Indeed. My commute to the living room is nearly unbearable.

There was a shoe in the way this morning. Almost ruined my day!
 
2013-10-29 01:07:28 PM

HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.


What precisely were we supposed to do when my wife worked in Downtown Houston and I worked in the Energy Corridor, 17 miles west on I-10?
 
2013-10-29 01:08:57 PM
I've never heard the term "reverse cummute" before.  I can only assume that "forward commuting" means that you are commuting INTO an urban area.  Okay.  I can see that.  And I did once have a commute that literally was the deffinition of the reverse.  Like 60 miles, the traffic going the other way was always congested, and I just drove right on.

But nowadays, my commute couldn't exactly be defined either way.  I drive through an urban area.  So for the 1st half, I get stuck in traffic, until I make it through Trenton.  Then I cross the bridge, and the traffic coming from PA is a gridlock trying to get to Trenton.

So what's the cool new term for that sort of commute?
 
2013-10-29 01:09:57 PM

El Morro: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

Yeah... because it's just that easy.  You ass.

In any case, I had a 3 hour round trip commute for a while.  It was hell.   My condolences to those of you on that kind of grind. These days, if a song starts on the radio when I get in my car, it's still playing when I pull into the parking lot at my job.  It's tough to put into words just how wonderful a short commute is.  It's a quality of life issue, really.


I never said it was easy.  But the people interviewed in TFA have, at least if we can judge from such quotes as "I'm a city person," chosen this lifestyle.  As I said above, if someone prefers a certain area for a reason, that's fine.  And if they're willing to commute in order to enjoy the area they want to live in, that's fine too.

But in life you often can't have it both ways and that's the case here.  The people in TFA want to live in the city while working in the suburbs and they don't like commuting.  Well.....those goals aren't compatible.

Look, I'm very sympathetic to people who have no choice WRT long commutes due to economic circumstances.  But that's not the people in TFA.  They're complaining about a commute that they chose for themselves, and that's annoying.
 
2013-10-29 01:10:06 PM
I have a 30 minute commute for a 20 mile drive on the goddamn 405.

/smug
 
2013-10-29 01:10:55 PM
I reverse commute from Seattle to Bellevue. I did it cause that's where I found a job. And no way in hell am I moving to the Eastside. My old commute was a 15 minute walk. That job sucked,so I'll put up with going over the I-90 bridge twice a day.
 
2013-10-29 01:11:46 PM

BEER_ME_in_CT: Why you would want to live in the city and commute out of it is beyond me.


I was raised in the sticks and now I live in the city.  I understand why people would do both.

What I don't get is the exurbs.  All of the traffic and high real estate prices of the city combined with the distances and boredom of the country.  A disaster.
 
2013-10-29 01:12:24 PM

Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.


Unless you happen to be a hiker or other type of nature lover.
 
2013-10-29 01:13:02 PM

durbnpoisn: But nowadays, my commute couldn't exactly be defined either way.  I drive through an urban area.  So for the 1st half, I get stuck in traffic, until I make it through Trenton.  Then I cross the bridge, and the traffic coming from PA is a gridlock trying to get to Trenton.

So what's the cool new term for that sort of commute?


Why the fark would you live in New Jersey if your job is in Pennsylvania? Spouse works in NYC?
 
2013-10-29 01:13:32 PM

Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.


I bought a house out in the suburbs. I'm a 10 minute walk to the commuter rail into downtown Boston. 30 minute ride. I used to just hang out in town after work and then take a train home later in the evening. Best of both worlds.

Anyhow, the article amused me. I love it when people say they're "city people" but are annoyed about having to share roads and other public resources with a lot of other people.
 
2013-10-29 01:15:18 PM
Hmm... I really should look into this electric car thingy.

And for those wondering, it's about 93 miles one way.  So I drive ~185 miles a day.  Yikes.
 
2013-10-29 01:15:36 PM

Disaster Transport: Actually, the crappy commute in the Chicago area is the suburb-to-suburb, east - west commute. It took at least 50+ minutes for me to get to my old job, 22 miles away. I would have loved to take the train, but the train system is just radial in and out of the city, so that meant one 55 minute ride into the city and another 45 minute ride out to the other suburb. Until we accept that people need mass transit from suburb to suburb it will continue to be a problem. I will never ever take another job that's over a 30 minute commute ever again, even if trains are an option. I miss quality time a home too much.

/new job is much closer
//traffic makes people crazy
///slashies crazy


Or we could, you know, not keep trying to build out suburbs farther and farther away from everything. It just isn't feasible to have a mass transit system that keeps up that well with urban sprawl. And since we have a bunch of empty space that's already well connected that would be a better avenue for development.
 
2013-10-29 01:16:01 PM

HailRobonia: If you;'re a woman and live in the city but commute to the country for your cattle herding job, does that make you a reverse cowgirl?


So a reverse commuter would be, you lay on your back and your girlfriend mounts your turgid member, facing away from you whilst doing thy NYT crossword puzzle on her Kindle and drinking a chai latte?

\fap
 
2013-10-29 01:17:52 PM

brantgoose: Reverse commuting sounds almost good to me. I've seen the highways during rush hour--backed up for blocks in one direction only with scarcely a car going the other way. If you're in the car going the other way, life is sweet, man!

It is not enough for that successful man that other people have to fail, they have to be seen to fail. To paraphrase a famous quip.

Mind you, I don't commute at all. I walk to and from work, 2.5 kilometers each way in roughly the time it would take to go by bus. Even better than driving past people stuck in a traffic jam--walking past people stuck in a traffic jam. But I try to avoid traffic altogether as I am a bit asthmatic and the smog makes me gag sometimes.

Even picking my way through the snow in other people's footprints is better than being jammed in a bus full of hot people in winter clothing that turns the air into something you'd expect in a laundry or in a mud room full of sweaters and mittens and wet boots.



I like your honesty. I appreciate how you found a way to make your commute work for you. Despite your attempt at gloating, you acknowledge that there are drawbacks to your choice and believe in full disclosure. I look forward to reading your newsletter and will buy cookies from your girl scouts. Sir, Ma'am, I salute you.
 
2013-10-29 01:18:04 PM

Cold_Sassy: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

Unless you happen to be a hiker or other type of nature lover.


Good point.  It takes me up to an hour to get to the mountains on Saturday.  If I lived in the burbs, it would only take 45 minutes.
 
2013-10-29 01:18:29 PM

ph0rk: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: ph0rk: If you can't guess what "reverse commuter" means, subby isn't at the top of the list of people you should be mad at.

/not subby

Commuter - one who commutes to work

Reverse commuter - one who... commutes to home? doesn't commute at all?

If you can smell plastic melting, you're probably thinking too hard.

Also: http://lmgtfy.com/?q=reverse+commuter&l=1


I don't think anyone is confused about the concept, we're just poking fun at the phrase.
 
2013-10-29 01:19:07 PM

HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.


Also a cunning plan, but who can afford to move every time they get a new job?   The days when you'd work at one place for 30 years are over.
 
2013-10-29 01:19:58 PM

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


George approves this message.

www.delawareonline.com
 
2013-10-29 01:20:53 PM

dittybopper: Jim_Callahan: Wouldn't a reverse commute be driving away from work at the start of the work-day, then returning to work at the end of the work-day, i.e. the night shift?

This is just a normal commute, the destination being in the suburbs doesn't actually make it not a commute.

This.  Your commute is scalar, not a vector.


Please don't do that.
 
2013-10-29 01:22:13 PM
I did my time and spent something like 3 years with a horrible car commute. I spent 1 of those 3 years constantly looking for work closer to home. Fortunately, I live in an area saturated with jobs in my field, so this go-around, I found a job that involves a 40 minute commute on mass transit and have scoped out routes so I can sit and veg out en route to and from work.

I grew up in a large city and Dad had a 30 minute train commute. He'd come home and be a Dad to us. I feel very sorry for those children whose dads (and moms) come home in time to say, "Go to bed, kids."  Do they really think their children have a better life? Cities are just not that bad to grow up in.
 
2013-10-29 01:22:45 PM

bdub77: With a picture of someone slogging through their terrible commute:

[media.npr.org image 850x476]
Nice brooch. Beats by Dre guy looks like he needs to shovel some more coffee into his mouth.


Agreed, nobody standing, plenty of room to stretch out...where do I sign up?
 
2013-10-29 01:23:24 PM

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


I was reading the article to see what the hell "reverse commuting was. Then I was wondering if this was like "reverse racism" in that there is nothing "reverse" about it.

I guess so.
 
2013-10-29 01:24:01 PM

dittybopper: El Morro: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

Yeah... because it's just that easy.  You ass.

In any case, I had a 3 hour round trip commute for a while.  It was hell.   My condolences to those of you on that kind of grind. These days, if a song starts on the radio when I get in my car, it's still playing when I pull into the parking lot at my job.  It's tough to put into words just how wonderful a short commute is.  It's a quality of life issue, really.

Meh.

I spend 2 hours a day in my car, an hour to work in the morning, and an hour back home.

In the morning, traffic is light, and I either chat on the radio with my local ham radio buddies, or I listen to Morning Edition on NPR to catch up on the news.  On the ride home, I get on the long-range radio if propagation is there, or I listen to All Things Considered.

Just yesterday I spent most of my commute "talking" to Wayne N5YFC down near Baton Rouge, LA.  I put talking in quotes because we were using Morse.  Anyway, being able to talk to new and interesting people and places adds a bit of excitement to the commute.

The only time it's "brutal" is in the winter when I have to drive slow and it takes twice as long, and just occasionally when there is a particularly bad accident.


Using an iambic keyer or a regular cw key?
 
2013-10-29 01:24:11 PM
You have to admit, "reverse commuting" does sound a lot better than "fark the environment."
 
2013-10-29 01:24:31 PM

lordargent: My area, in a nutshell.

Commuting: Live where the property is affordable, commute to work (an area where property is expensive and salaries are higher).

VS

Reverse Commuting: Live where the property is expensive, commute to work (an area where property is cheaper and salaries are lower).

[synapticnulship.com image 425x340]


Live where it's expensive and work where it's expensive.

www.trekstop.com

Profit.

6 miles... all on the greenbelt so I don't douche it up by riding in the ROAD and disobeying traffic laws.

/ducks
 
2013-10-29 01:26:10 PM

van1ty: Hmm... I really should look into this electric car thingy.

And for those wondering, it's about 93 miles one way.  So I drive ~185 miles a day.  Yikes.


I would suggest moving. nobody needs to live that far away unless it is temporary thing. Accounting for vacation you could easily top 215,000 miles in just 5 years. Is your job paying you enough to buy a new car every 5 years vs working somewhere local for less money?
 
2013-10-29 01:27:00 PM

under a mountain: Agreed, nobody standing, plenty of room to stretch out...where do I sign up?


Problem is those reverse commute trains usually only run once an hour, and there's no express trains.
 
2013-10-29 01:27:23 PM

LandOfChocolate: nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.

Don't be thick.

It used to be that people commuted in from the suburbs to jobs in the city.  The other way during rush hour generally saw lighter traffic.

Apparently that is not the case any more.


Nice reverse reply.
 
2013-10-29 01:29:02 PM
The problem is that people work 5 days a week, 50 weeks a year. They cram enjoyment of the different into two weeks, generally two weeks shared by a bunch of cortisol OD'ing people in the same boat.

Quit your job, burn your possessions, and go for a walkabout.
 
2013-10-29 01:29:14 PM
Subby is a reverse genius
 
2013-10-29 01:29:22 PM

Disaster Transport: Actually, the crappy commute in the Chicago area is the suburb-to-suburb, east - west commute

almost every single pair of points on a map you could imagine


/Milwaukeean
//12 mile commute, Bay View to Glendale, about 15 min. morning, 25 min. afternoon
 
2013-10-29 01:30:19 PM

HailRobonia: Gunny Highway: I love my commute.  Two 30-40 minute train rides a day  allow me to listen to podcasts, music, or read.  All that said, I really miss driving to work.

For me, time-wise, public transportation makes sense. But the big problem with public transportation is the public. It's hard to relax and enjoy my commute when we're all crammed into a train like cattle, surrounded by jerk-ass people who won't move further into the car, stink, cough and sneeze all over the place, jam you in the back with their over-sized purses, smash you with their giant backpacks, and other assorted unpleasantness.


That is all part of the process, I guess.  I try to sit in the Quiet Car every day which people respect for the most part.  The conductors do a good job of policing people who do not respect the rules which I appreciate.

The scenery is nice and the ride is smooth.
 
2013-10-29 01:30:56 PM

Rapmaster2000: Cold_Sassy: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

Unless you happen to be a hiker or other type of nature lover.

Good point.  It takes me up to an hour to get to the mountains on Saturday.  If I lived in the burbs, it would only take 45 minutes.


I'm talking about doing it every day to decompress and exercise the dogs, not some hipster weekend hobby.
 
2013-10-29 01:32:07 PM
Working from home, getting a kick.
 
2013-10-29 01:32:23 PM
My commute is pretty tough. Sometimes the walk from my desk in the living room to the liquor cabinet on the other side of the room feels so long that I don't start drinking from my excellent whiskey collection until two or even three in the afternoon.
 
2013-10-29 01:32:40 PM
Simple mistakes being made as far as I can see, you're all getting your cheap Fruit of the Loom shorts wadded up in your waxy folds of stinking genitalia for no reason.
Your assumption that reverse commuting refers to something called a 'commute' done backwards is laughable. Any fool knows that Subby is referring to a reverse Etummoc.
 
2013-10-29 01:34:00 PM

KAzaMM: 4 mile commute. Less than ten minutes everyday. Have a nice day.


*nucks*
 
2013-10-29 01:34:02 PM

Cold_Sassy: Rapmaster2000: Cold_Sassy: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

Unless you happen to be a hiker or other type of nature lover.

Good point.  It takes me up to an hour to get to the mountains on Saturday.  If I lived in the burbs, it would only take 45 minutes.

I'm talking about doing it every day to decompress and exercise the dogs, not some hipster weekend hobby.


Hiking on occasion makes you a hipster.  Got it.

Stop using that word.
 
2013-10-29 01:35:01 PM
People who live in the city can avoid a long commute only by working in the (same) city. People who live in the suburbs pretty much can't avoid a painful commute, because even if you're job is also in the 'burbs, it's likely to be in a different part of the sprawl. Being sprawled out is, after all, the whole point of suburbs.

Some people have suggested moving to live near work. That can work in the city, because you can restrict your job search to that city. Now that the days of lifetime employment are over, though, an attempt to operate that way in the suburbs would be a little like the old Steve Martin routine:
I know a lot of you people are sitting out there saying to yourselves, "Steve - you're a rambling guy. Is it tough for you, traveling from town to town, staying in different hotels every night, all alone, not with your friends?" Well, I've kind of worked that out now, I've got a whole new policy. Like, I came into New York early this morning, bought a house. Met a cute gal, got married. We had a little baby, another one on the way. Tomorrow: wake up, have a home-cooked meal, sell the house, get a divorce, and get on to the next town. So, this is what Steve is doing now.
 
2013-10-29 01:35:46 PM

Gunny Highway: Cold_Sassy: Rapmaster2000: Cold_Sassy: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

Unless you happen to be a hiker or other type of nature lover.

Good point.  It takes me up to an hour to get to the mountains on Saturday.  If I lived in the burbs, it would only take 45 minutes.

I'm talking about doing it every day to decompress and exercise the dogs, not some hipster weekend hobby.

Hiking on occasion makes you a hipster.  Got it.

Stop using that word.


You could just MYOB.  Rapmaster was the one who mouthed off.
 
2013-10-29 01:37:03 PM

Cold_Sassy: Gunny Highway: Cold_Sassy: Rapmaster2000: Cold_Sassy: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

Unless you happen to be a hiker or other type of nature lover.

Good point.  It takes me up to an hour to get to the mountains on Saturday.  If I lived in the burbs, it would only take 45 minutes.

I'm talking about doing it every day to decompress and exercise the dogs, not some hipster weekend hobby.

Hiking on occasion makes you a hipster.  Got it.

Stop using that word.

You could just MYOB.  Rapmaster was the one who mouthed off.


Sorry, my hipster hobby of the week is not MYOBing.
 
2013-10-29 01:37:49 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Subby is a reverse genius


So does that mean he's doing a handstand? Or is he standing with his back to us?
 
2013-10-29 01:39:16 PM
We made a choice to build out in the boonies because we got more house for our buck, schools were good, taxes are freaking low, crime is practically non-existent and the area is clean. I can step outside on a summer night and watch meteor showers that would be drowned out by light pollution in the city.

When I worked downtown it was a 15 minute drive to the train station then an hour ride in while I slept or read. Now I have to drive to another suburb which takes me 90 minutes  for a 50 mile trip. It sucks but I catch up on my audio books.

Suggesting that people just move to be closer to their jobs might be slightly feasible if you are single and know your job is for life but it's not realistic for the rest of us. I've worked for tech companies that have been bought out or moved out of state requiring me to get a new job. So I'm supposed to move every time I get a new position just to avoid a longer commute? Not to mention how absolutely stellar the housing market is. I do try to look for jobs where I can use public transportation or where the drive isn't outrageous but sometimes you have to suck it up and work wherever the jobs are, especially when the economy goes down the crapper.
 
2013-10-29 01:39:17 PM
farm1.staticflickr.com
 
2013-10-29 01:39:50 PM

Cold_Sassy: Rapmaster2000: Cold_Sassy: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

Unless you happen to be a hiker or other type of nature lover.

Good point.  It takes me up to an hour to get to the mountains on Saturday.  If I lived in the burbs, it would only take 45 minutes.

I'm talking about doing it every day to decompress and exercise the dogs, not some hipster weekend hobby.


So what you're saying is, these hipsters just don't enjoy nature as authentically as you do.  For them, nature is just some casual hobby.  They're not out there living the real nature lifestyle like you are.  They're just a bunch of poseurs.

If only there were a name for people that looked down on others for not being sufficiently authentic.
 
2013-10-29 01:40:08 PM

bopis: Rent Party: Chicago is one of the few midwestern cities I'd move to, primarily because of the CTA.  I love those trains, and it's a great town.

I used to love the CTA until I had to use it everyday.


I just spent a week in Oak Park, and rode the green line into the city center and back every day.  All I could think was "man, I could do this every day."

What happens if you do that every day for months on end?
 
2013-10-29 01:40:32 PM

YixilTesiphon: durbnpoisn: But nowadays, my commute couldn't exactly be defined either way.  I drive through an urban area.  So for the 1st half, I get stuck in traffic, until I make it through Trenton.  Then I cross the bridge, and the traffic coming from PA is a gridlock trying to get to Trenton.

So what's the cool new term for that sort of commute?

Why the fark would you live in New Jersey if your job is in Pennsylvania? Spouse works in NYC?


Because try to sell a house in NJ.  We would lose so much money it's not even worth trying.
 
2013-10-29 01:40:37 PM

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


Depending on where you live there can be a huge difference in your commute depending on which direction you go. For example I have a "reverse commute" - I have minimal traffic and unrestricted roads because I'm commuting out of the city while everyone else is commuting in. If my commute went the other way my travel time would easily double and the highway section would be off limits to me due to HOV restrictions during commuting hours.
 
2013-10-29 01:40:38 PM
Remember this: this guy's 35-mile one way commute is long for forward or reverse commute. I will add that this guy has to be in the northern part of the city, as far from Argonne as possible.  He is more than reverse commuting, he is going all the way through the city.  Chicago's highways are always busy, but way worse in the peak direction.
 
2013-10-29 01:41:13 PM

jackiepaper: I drive from SF to the burbs about 20 miles. My commute would take exactly the same amount of time if reversed.


I'm just curious what qualifies as the burbs of SF?

Are we talking South SF or are we talking Burlingame/San Mateo?
 
2013-10-29 01:41:19 PM

Jim_Callahan: Wouldn't a reverse commute be driving away from work at the start of the work-day, then returning to work at the end of the work-day, i.e. the night shift?

This is just a normal commute, the destination being in the suburbs doesn't actually make it not a commute.


That's exactly what I was thinking when I heard reverse commuters...
 
2013-10-29 01:41:44 PM

paygun: You have to admit, "reverse commuting" does sound a lot better than "fark the environment."


??? It's no different, environment-wise, than driving from the country to the city daily.
 
2013-10-29 01:42:09 PM
I commute from my bedroom to my living room, with one stop in the kitchen for coffee. Some days I reverse commute from the living room back to the bedroom for a lunchtime nap.

/smug telecommuter
 
2013-10-29 01:44:17 PM

HailRobonia: For me, time-wise, public transportation makes sense.


I wish it was even a half-arsed compromise for me; I'd rather not deal with traffic. It would take me twice as long by bus, and the only trains near my house are freight trains. A 20 minute highway drive on a quiet day becomes a 45 minute commute on side roads and an hour-and-a-half-plus bus ride.

If public transportation is communism, call me "Red" and send Joe McCarthy my dossier.
 
2013-10-29 01:45:19 PM

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


It's like "reverse racism", there's no such thing. Racism is racism no matter which race it is targeting.
 
2013-10-29 01:45:25 PM
This was something to be smug about?!?!?

I did this for years, and never was smug about it!!!! I missed out, because I've moved closer to work.

Oh well, I can be smug about living 1.5 miles from work and around the corner from a grocery store and kick ass Mexican restaurant now.
 
2013-10-29 01:45:26 PM
The other morning I hit snooze a few too many times and overslept.  My son woke me, and I looked at my phone and saw it was 7:42.  I still made it to work by 8:00, even with stopping to put the trash on the curb.  Being able to go home and eat lunch with my family every day is nice too.
 
2013-10-29 01:45:27 PM
--> It's almost as if  living a long distance away , from where you work, is a hassle .

i2.kym-cdn.com
 
2013-10-29 01:46:44 PM
I live like 3 miles from work, I probably burn less gas than you no matter how fuel efficient your ride.
 
2013-10-29 01:48:59 PM
So happy to work at home.

/walks away feelin' smug.
 
2013-10-29 01:49:25 PM

Rapmaster2000: Cold_Sassy: Rapmaster2000: Cold_Sassy: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

Unless you happen to be a hiker or other type of nature lover.

Good point.  It takes me up to an hour to get to the mountains on Saturday.  If I lived in the burbs, it would only take 45 minutes.

I'm talking about doing it every day to decompress and exercise the dogs, not some hipster weekend hobby.

So what you're saying is, these hipsters just don't enjoy nature as authentically as you do.  For them, nature is just some casual hobby.  They're not out there living the real nature lifestyle like you are.  They're just a bunch of poseurs.

If only there were a name for people that looked down on others for not being sufficiently authentic.


Not necessarily,  all I am saying is that I do it EVERY day by choice and you do it on Saturdays.  If you like it so much, why do you live in the city?
 
2013-10-29 01:50:28 PM

Ambivalence: nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.

It's like "reverse racism", there's no such thing. Racism is racism no matter which race it is targeting.


I have the same issue with the prefix "pre"

Useless prefix is useless.
 
2013-10-29 01:51:32 PM

Cold_Sassy: Not necessarily,  all I am saying is that I do it EVERY day by choice and you do it on Saturdays.  If you like it so much, why do you live in the city?


This just in: Human beings tend to have varied interests. More at 11.
 
2013-10-29 01:51:40 PM

usafdave: Profit.

6 miles... all on the greenbelt so I don't douche it up by riding in the ROAD and disobeying traffic laws.

/ducks


No worries man, I've been biking to work for 17 years now.

And yes, I'm a professional and I dress up (i.e. not bike clothes) for work.
 
2013-10-29 01:51:45 PM
The DC suburbs of 20 years ago want their news story back.

/seriously, this is not news
//but NPR only writes for old people and hipsters
 
2013-10-29 01:51:50 PM
I live in downtown St. Pete, work in Tampa.  Kind of stupid, but you couldn't pay me to live in Tampa.
 
2013-10-29 01:52:15 PM
I can't believe how many people can't grasp the term "reverse commute."

Imagine it this way: during morning rush hour, if you looked at a highway, you'd likely see bumper-to-bumper traffic headed from the suburbs to the city, and lighter traffic headed away from the city.  On the subway, you'd have people packed in like sardines from the outlying areas to the city center, but once the trains leave the city center, it's easy to get a seat.

Having a term for reverse commuting (in my experience) is a way of saying that you don't have to put up with all the bullshiat that comes from rush hour, because you're going in the opposite direction of the normal flow of people.

The article is saying that the flow is evening out (at least in Chicago), because more jobs are opening up in the suburbs, while living in the city is becoming more attractive, so all the reverse commuters who thought they had such a good deal aren't getting a better commute than traditional commuters.
 
2013-10-29 01:54:05 PM
I laugh a schadenfreudey laugh at all the people who moved to the suburbs to get away from the... um... and then discovered that what they ran away from followed them, because non-whites appreciate lower housing prices, too.
 
2013-10-29 01:54:28 PM

The Lone Gunman: So by "reverse commuters" you mean...commuters.


I thought this was "coming to work at 5, going home at 9", not "commuting"...
 
2013-10-29 01:55:10 PM
The reverse commute glory is alive and well in Milwaukee.  Took me 20 minutes to traverse 14 miles.  And really, about a third of that was spent sitting at stoplights making my way over to the interstate.

Would I prefer to just have a downtown job and bus or take the bike?  You bet.  But one can't be too picky about location when you're a recent college grad trying to get a job in Wisconsin.  I'll pay the extra travel cost for the vastly superior entertainment and cultural life found in the city.
 
2013-10-29 01:55:50 PM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: StopLurkListen: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: That's what keeps Kathy LeVeque, 31, in Chicago, too. "I'm a city person," she says.

Then get a city job.

Yes, jobs are plentiful and everywhere and are all the same and equally good and appropriate. Jobs are also secure and not at all volatile and you can count on being in the same job until you retire so base your long-term home location decisions on the job you have right at this very moment.

Then I guess they should be happy they have a job at all, and quit biatching about the commute.


Pretty much this.
 
2013-10-29 01:59:33 PM

HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.


Sure, then also tell employers to stop relocating to wherever they can get a tax break instead of where large numbers of people live.
 
2013-10-29 02:00:04 PM
Cold_Sassy:

Not necessarily,  all I am saying is that I do it EVERY day

Uh huh.
 
2013-10-29 02:00:57 PM

Contents Under Pressure: I laugh a schadenfreudey laugh at all the people who moved to the suburbs to get away from the... um... and then discovered that what they ran away from followed them, because non-whites appreciate lower housing prices, too.


Who are these people?
 
2013-10-29 02:01:29 PM

durbnpoisn: YixilTesiphon: durbnpoisn: But nowadays, my commute couldn't exactly be defined either way.  I drive through an urban area.  So for the 1st half, I get stuck in traffic, until I make it through Trenton.  Then I cross the bridge, and the traffic coming from PA is a gridlock trying to get to Trenton.

So what's the cool new term for that sort of commute?

Why the fark would you live in New Jersey if your job is in Pennsylvania? Spouse works in NYC?

Because try to sell a house in NJ.  We would lose so much money it's not even worth trying.


Can't even rent it out? I feel like at some point it must be worth it just to walk away from a mortgage. That's what my neighbors did - they spent $400k in 2006 on a house very similar to one I bought for $190k last year. Shortly after I bought they seem to have just signed it over to the bank.
 
2013-10-29 02:01:31 PM
I have a wonderful reverse commute now, just under 10 miles and 15 minutes each way. I get a great view of the people jammed up on the other side of the divided highway twice a day. In seven months, I've had no morning delays and only two evening delays, both which were solved by an alternate route adding only 5 minutes to the trip. I love it!
 
2013-10-29 02:01:45 PM
I used to fark this chick that caught the same morning bus as me.

/she was ugly.
 
2013-10-29 02:01:57 PM
This guy hasn't seen the reverse commute traffic jam on I-66 inside the beltway. Thanks to the HOV restrictions, me and my fake hybrid cruise into DC while all the reverse commuters sit backed up. It doesn't help that the worst stretch of road is the part in Fairfax county. The inbound part has extra lanes open, and is still a nightmare because Virginians can merge drive or plan a road network that doesn't have people using an interstate to go less than 2 miles. The outbound lanes are slightly better out there, but aren't great. The afternoon rush 6 hours are awful in both directions.
 
2013-10-29 02:02:03 PM

odinsposse: Disaster Transport: Actually, the crappy commute in the Chicago area is the suburb-to-suburb, east - west commute. It took at least 50+ minutes for me to get to my old job, 22 miles away. I would have loved to take the train, but the train system is just radial in and out of the city, so that meant one 55 minute ride into the city and another 45 minute ride out to the other suburb. Until we accept that people need mass transit from suburb to suburb it will continue to be a problem. I will never ever take another job that's over a 30 minute commute ever again, even if trains are an option. I miss quality time a home too much.

/new job is much closer
//traffic makes people crazy
///slashies crazy

Or we could, you know, not keep trying to build out suburbs farther and farther away from everything. It just isn't feasible to have a mass transit system that keeps up that well with urban sprawl. And since we have a bunch of empty space that's already well connected that would be a better avenue for development.


In the case of Chicago about 40% of the city is livable; in other words, 40% of the city has gangs that are smart enough to not kill the golden goose (working class/middle class/upper middle class people that buy drugs). The rest of the city is plagued with abandoned buildings and empty lots.

The suburbs are sort of cheaper to live in. However, there is nothing to do out there and it is more expensive to live out there than you would think. A big part of the cost is property taxes, which are lower in the city than the better suburbs because the suburbs have a smaller tax base. Chicago has all those commercial high rises throwing tons of money into the city treasury and the condo buildings which bring in a lot of money per lot. So, the tax burden of a single property owner is less than say Downers Grove or Evanston.

Another hidden cost in the suburbs is the cost of a car. Not only gas, but also maintenance,etc. Even if you have a car in the city, the overall cost is lower because it is used so much less.

The biggest advantage of living in the city, in my opinion, is the opportunity for exercise. I can walk anywhere I need to go. Grocery store? 10 minute walk. The park? 4 minute walk. A bar? 3 minute walk. A bunch of specialty stores and restaurants? 5 minute walk. I can also jog in the park or bicycle on the bike trail. All of those little walks add up!

I also have a 20 minute commute to work downtown, door to door, and could walk the 2 miles to work if I had to. I think the urban renaissance that some large cities are having will continue and we will see places like the west and south sides of chicago gentrify in the next 30 years or so as the holdouts age and die, and as the younger people are dispersed throughout the state to other communities, including the suburbs. I think that the land is simply too valuable to be abandoned. Detroit is screwed though.
 
2013-10-29 02:02:39 PM
I commute opposite of traffic which is fine but I live in a small city so my commute ranges from 8 minutes (4 am no traffic all flashing reds) to 15 minutes (peak rush hour with slow bridge). I once took half an hour to get home and just about took a sick day the next day.

The big thing here is to move on the east side of the city. There's a large naval base in the city so it was obviously targeted by the reds so nobody lived down wind. Property values were really low over there. That's started to shift so you can get reasonable places out on that side. I could be burying a hooker deep in the woods and be at work in under half an hour. Convenient.
 
2013-10-29 02:06:05 PM
My house and job are in the suburbs, so I subcommute.
 
2013-10-29 02:06:48 PM

hausman007: This guy hasn't seen the reverse commute traffic jam on I-66 inside the beltway. Thanks to the HOV restrictions, me and my fake hybrid cruise into DC while all the reverse commuters sit backed up. It doesn't help that the worst stretch of road is the part in Fairfax county. The inbound part has extra lanes open, and is still a nightmare because Virginians can merge drive or plan a road network that doesn't have people using an interstate to go less than 2 miles. The outbound lanes are slightly better out there, but aren't great. The afternoon rush 6 hours are awful in both directions.


I66 is awful, I avoid if at all possible regardless of day or time. I'm a little northwest of you, reverse commuting on 28 and 7.
 
2013-10-29 02:08:11 PM
Why are they talking about 6am as if it's some ungodly early hour for a human to have to endure? Something tells me young creative media major writing this has never had a real job.
 
2013-10-29 02:08:23 PM

meat0918: This was something to be smug about?!?!?



Not in tfa as far as I could tell. I didn't see anyone acting particularly smug about living in Chicago, just a little matter-of-fact 'I like living in a big city'. I think submitter was imagining things again.
 
2013-10-29 02:08:49 PM

Gunny Highway: Contents Under Pressure: I laugh a schadenfreudey laugh at all the people who moved to the suburbs to get away from the... um... and then discovered that what they ran away from followed them, because non-whites appreciate lower housing prices, too.

Who are these people?


Take DC for example. The history of virtually every neighborhood is:

"The neighborhood was a prosperous working/middle class white neighborhood until 19XX when some black families managed to get together enough money to buy some houses there. Over the next decade the neighborhood declined into a poor predominately black neighborhood, where it remained until recent gentrification due to young professionals seeking housing closer to work and amenities"
 
2013-10-29 02:09:45 PM
I lived in downtown DC. farking terrible TERRIBLE traffic yeah? But I worked up in Greenbelt, MD. 20 Miles northeast of town.

Every single blessed morning, in the car, out the door and going 60 the whoooole way up the BW Parkway, just gloriously flipping off every sad sonofabiatch who was stuck in bumper to bumer on the other side of the road. It was possibly the greatest part of my day.

Hey, wanna take a guess what happened at 5 pm on my way home??? :-D MORE FLIPPAGGGEEE!!!!1!!!1!!! Took me 25 minutes to get home.

Suck it.
 
2013-10-29 02:12:16 PM

lordargent: My area, in a nutshell.

Commuting: Live where the property is affordable, commute to work (an area where property is expensive and salaries are higher).

VS

Reverse Commuting: Live where the property is expensive, commute to work (an area where property is cheaper and salaries are lower).

[synapticnulship.com image 425x340]


Uh.  This.  I work in DC.  For the federal government.  And not as a contractor.  Which means I can't afford to live anywhere within a 30 mile radius of the DC border without living in total squalor.

If I worked in the suburbs where my home is, I'd be making at least $15k less annually.  And then wouldn't be able to afford my home.

And in the DC Metro area, it doesn't matter if you're going in to or out of DC, all ten rush hours per day suck.
 
2013-10-29 02:12:31 PM

Target Builder: Gunny Highway: Contents Under Pressure: I laugh a schadenfreudey laugh at all the people who moved to the suburbs to get away from the... um... and then discovered that what they ran away from followed them, because non-whites appreciate lower housing prices, too.

Who are these people?

Take DC for example. The history of virtually every neighborhood is:

"The neighborhood was a prosperous working/middle class white neighborhood until 19XX when some black families managed to get together enough money to buy some houses there. Over the next decade the neighborhood declined into a poor predominately black neighborhood, where it remained until recent gentrification due to young professionals seeking housing closer to work and amenities"


Where does racism fit in?
 
2013-10-29 02:13:23 PM
I work from home. My commute is under thirty seconds. I laugh at you all.
 
2013-10-29 02:14:03 PM

aerojockey: I have a 30 minute commute for a 20 mile drive on the goddamn 405.

/smug smog


FTFY
 
2013-10-29 02:14:06 PM
I work in my garage. I can't drive there though. There's nowhere to park.
 
2013-10-29 02:15:28 PM
Honestly I wish that I could have a shorter commute and I'd maybe even consider living in a suburb- if they all didn't have just as much obnoxious traffic as the downtown area does, AND more tourists around them, but with nothing that I find entertaining. I am so not a theme park person, despite working at one.

I really need to move out of Orlando... but I worked so hard to get my job and I really like it so commute it is. At least I like living downtown but one day 1-4 is going to kill me.
 
2013-10-29 02:15:48 PM

WhiskeyBoy: lordargent: My area, in a nutshell.

Commuting: Live where the property is affordable, commute to work (an area where property is expensive and salaries are higher).

VS

Reverse Commuting: Live where the property is expensive, commute to work (an area where property is cheaper and salaries are lower).

[synapticnulship.com image 425x340]

Uh.  This.  I work in DC.  For the federal government.  And not as a contractor.  Which means I can't afford to live anywhere within a 30 mile radius of the DC border without living in total squalor.

If I worked in the suburbs where my home is, I'd be making at least $15k less annually.  And then wouldn't be able to afford my home.

And in the DC Metro area, it doesn't matter if you're going in to or out of DC, all ten rush hours per day suck.


I got lucky and found a townhouse that's only 25 miles from DC and only costs 2 weeks take home pay for the mortgage. It is in a real neighborhood though with sidewalks and street lights which are both things VA has failed to figure out.
 
2013-10-29 02:17:45 PM
It's real simple people, move to were you work.  If that means a cheap apartment instead of a giant mortgage, oh well. BTW you're insane to buy anything less than several acres anyway, because if you buy land you can build a shop or grow a cashcrop - something to make the land pay for itself.  A "house" is just a never ending series of expenses culminating in a market crash where you end up owing more than  it can be sold for.
 
2013-10-29 02:21:02 PM

WhiskeyBoy: lordargent: My area, in a nutshell.

Commuting: Live where the property is affordable, commute to work (an area where property is expensive and salaries are higher).

VS

Reverse Commuting: Live where the property is expensive, commute to work (an area where property is cheaper and salaries are lower).

[synapticnulship.com image 425x340]

Uh.  This.  I work in DC.  For the federal government.  And not as a contractor.  Which means I can't afford to live anywhere within a 30 mile radius of the DC border without living in total squalor.

If I worked in the suburbs where my home is, I'd be making at least $15k less annually.  And then wouldn't be able to afford my home.

And in the DC Metro area, it doesn't matter if you're going in to or out of DC, all ten rush hours per day suck.


A friend of mine lives in a apt right across from the Ballson Metro. One of the other tennants owned his 3 br setup there. He came to my buddy (29) and said Look im gonna sell, get your stuff together and make an offer and ill give you priority. sale is in two weeks on a given Friday.

So he goes out and gets his chickens in line. Price is 200k. My friend then offers the guy 190 makes his offer for 190 and locked it. Saturday morning, seller shows up and is in shock. 'uh what were you thinking man??'. Guy moved the shiat in 24 hours for 375k to some 50 year old lawyer who was tired of having to make the commute from Manassas.

That commute is what keeps the prices high.

/Arlington near Westover
 
2013-10-29 02:21:28 PM

CruJones: I did this when I lived in Memphis.  Had a house downtown on the river, but worked way out east.  It was great, because I was going against traffic every day, but living where the fun was, rather than vice versa.


I did that back in the day for the same reason. I  didn't own a car and would basically be stranded if I lived near work. My commute wasn't short but I was usually one of maybe 2-3 people on a commuter train car going against the flow of traffic so it was nice and quiet. It was better to get home at 7 and be downtown than 6:00 in the middle of nowhere.
 
2013-10-29 02:22:40 PM

KAzaMM: 4 mile commute. Less than ten minutes everyday. Have a nice day.


1 mile commute.  6 minutes travel time.  On a bike.  Living and working downtown.

I will and you do the same, friend!   :-)
 
2013-10-29 02:22:52 PM

bdub77: With a picture of someone slogging through their terrible commute:

[media.npr.org image 850x476]
Nice brooch. Beats by Dre guy looks like he needs to shovel some more coffee into his mouth.


Metra seats face inward?! That's awkward.

/ Caltrain is better
// not the new cars, though
 
2013-10-29 02:22:58 PM
When we lived in Charlotte I was reverse commuting before it was cool.   We had just gotten married and moved down there for work because that's what good hillbillies do.  I had been to NC often as a kid thanks to some family property on Lake Norman (smug).  In that newlywed phase we didn't have a lot of money and didn't want to rent to pay someone else's mortgage, so my boss hooked me up with her Realtor friend.  We wind up finding a nice little ranch in a "re-emerging" neighborhood a mile outside "Uptown" with a great-sized lot by city standards.

(There's a buzzword...re-emerging.  Otherwise known as buying into a neighborhood where all the original whites fled for the suburbs and now populated by a mix of poor/lower middle class whites, immigrant cultures, and illegals after the crime moved to other neighborhoods.)

Five minute commute into the skyscrapers, ten minutes home. When I wound up working in the suburbs it was fifteen minutes north in the morning, fifteen minutes back south.  It was a great little neighborhood too.  Low crime, nice neighbors, a great little mix of chain and locally owned shops and restaurants, and being in the center of the metro everything in the suburbs was 20 minutes away.

We decided to move back home to be closer to family - we're not into seven hour drives each way with two kids and two dogs several times a year.  Sold the re-emerging house for a sweet profit and kept my job as a telecommuter.

/Smug
 
2013-10-29 02:23:19 PM
TFA: "his 35-mile commute out to Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago's southwest suburbs..."

Farkers: WHY NOT JUST MOVE CLOSER?  OR GET ANOTHER JOB!  GET ANOTHER HOUSE!

TFA: "Why not just move closer to his job? Jim's wife, Susan, has a long commute to a northern suburb in the opposite direction of Jim's."

Farkers:  GET ANOTHER JOB, HOUSE, AND WIFE!!! AAAAAARRRGH!!!
 
2013-10-29 02:23:28 PM
Time to change peoples hours, if you work for the Feds, you day shouldn't start till 11am.

Make the whole goddam day a traffic jam.
 
2013-10-29 02:23:49 PM

dittybopper: El Morro: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

Yeah... because it's just that easy.  You ass.

In any case, I had a 3 hour round trip commute for a while.  It was hell.   My condolences to those of you on that kind of grind. These days, if a song starts on the radio when I get in my car, it's still playing when I pull into the parking lot at my job.  It's tough to put into words just how wonderful a short commute is.  It's a quality of life issue, really.

Meh.

I spend 2 hours a day in my car, an hour to work in the morning, and an hour back home.

In the morning, traffic is light, and I either chat on the radio with my local ham radio buddies, or I listen to Morning Edition on NPR to catch up on the news.  On the ride home, I get on the long-range radio if propagation is there, or I listen to All Things Considered.

Just yesterday I spent most of my commute "talking" to Wayne N5YFC down near Baton Rouge, LA.  I put talking in quotes because we were using Morse.  Anyway, being able to talk to new and interesting people and places adds a bit of excitement to the commute.

The only time it's "brutal" is in the winter when I have to drive slow and it takes twice as long, and just occasionally when there is a particularly bad accident.


What band were you on?
 
2013-10-29 02:27:39 PM
Our office is near Deerfield IL, and I have to drive to down town Chicago a couple times a week to visit client locations. Particularly during the evening rush hour(s), the traffic going into the city is a LOT worse the traffic heading north. Granted, the reversible lanes take up some of the slack. I absolutely HATE sitting in traffic, just makes my blood boil. Lucky for me I live very close to the office, so I am on the clock for these commutes. It's hard to get frustrated while being paid to sit in traffic. We have more then a few employees who live very far from the office, and then biatch and moan about the commute. I agree with the posts higher up, move as close to work as possible.
 
2013-10-29 02:27:46 PM

Disaster Transport: Actually, the crappy commute in the Chicago area is the suburb-to-suburb, east - west commute. It took at least 50+ minutes for me to get to my old job, 22 miles away. I would have loved to take the train, but the train system is just radial in and out of the city, so that meant one 55 minute ride into the city and another 45 minute ride out to the other suburb. Until we accept that people need mass transit from suburb to suburb it will continue to be a problem. I will never ever take another job that's over a 30 minute commute ever again, even if trains are an option. I miss quality time a home too much.


Radial system and patchwork suburban bus system - that right there is makes for the nightmare that is ChicagoLand (and many other big city/urban areas). The article notes that some companies have shuttle buses, but that is nowhere near all of them. For those people who work for smaller companies, you better hope that some bus is going your way. Also, the ChicagoLand commuter bus schedule favors those who live in the suburbs in that there is a flurry of buses from the subdivisions to the train in the AM and the reverse in the PM. For the rest of us, it is about one bus every hour or so (depending on the route of course).

This article paints somewhat of a rosy picture of the "reverse commuter", but the reality is that it is far less workable to people who do not have the luxury of working for some big corp entity with a shuttle. I mean, obviously the reverse commute can be done, but Chicagoland has a long way to go in tweaking the "after the train ride" transit system so that it is viable option for the masses. As of now, if it works for you, consider yourself very lucky.

I am just happy that I work at home and have a car. Otherwise, I would not live in the strip-mall-suburban-wasteland that is ChicagoLand.
 
2013-10-29 02:29:15 PM

Rent Party: bopis: Rent Party: Chicago is one of the few midwestern cities I'd move to, primarily because of the CTA.  I love those trains, and it's a great town.

I used to love the CTA until I had to use it everyday.

I just spent a week in Oak Park, and rode the green line into the city center and back every day.  All I could think was "man, I could do this every day."

What happens if you do that every day for months on end?


I live in the very NW corner of the city and take Bus->L->Bus each direction to my workplace.  Have for years, year round.  The kennedy is always a parking lot.   I like being on my feet and i read books and listen to music or putz with my phone each way.  Free exercise, no miles on the car and saves gas.  The only part of it that can really suck is that I take the 80 irving, so during the summer Cub fans crowd the bus.  When it's freezing out, I make soup and bring it along.  All depends on what you make of it I suppose...
 
2013-10-29 02:30:04 PM
Meh, worker drone people problems.
 
2013-10-29 02:31:13 PM

trickymoo: WhiskeyBoy: lordargent: My area, in a nutshell.

Commuting: Live where the property is affordable, commute to work (an area where property is expensive and salaries are higher).

VS

Reverse Commuting: Live where the property is expensive, commute to work (an area where property is cheaper and salaries are lower).

[synapticnulship.com image 425x340]

Uh.  This.  I work in DC.  For the federal government.  And not as a contractor.  Which means I can't afford to live anywhere within a 30 mile radius of the DC border without living in total squalor.

If I worked in the suburbs where my home is, I'd be making at least $15k less annually.  And then wouldn't be able to afford my home.

And in the DC Metro area, it doesn't matter if you're going in to or out of DC, all ten rush hours per day suck.

A friend of mine lives in a apt right across from the Ballson Metro. One of the other tennants owned his 3 br setup there. He came to my buddy (29) and said Look im gonna sell, get your stuff together and make an offer and ill give you priority. sale is in two weeks on a given Friday.

So he goes out and gets his chickens in line. Price is 200k. My friend then offers the guy 190 makes his offer for 190 and locked it. Saturday morning, seller shows up and is in shock. 'uh what were you thinking man??'. Guy moved the shiat in 24 hours for 375k to some 50 year old lawyer who was tired of having to make the commute from Manassas.

That commute is what keeps the prices high.

/Arlington near Westover


When I moved out here for a job at the Pentagon, I looked at the apartments across the street and they wanted $2,700-3,000 for a 1000 sq ft 2 bedroom and $4,500-5,000 for a 3 br. Even not having to pay commuting costs that's ridiculous. For the price of a 3 bedroom apartment you could get a $1 million mortgage, which even in Arlington you could afford a house.
 
2013-10-29 02:31:30 PM

YixilTesiphon: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

What precisely were we supposed to do when my wife worked in Downtown Houston and I worked in the Energy Corridor, 17 miles west on I-10?


The Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County, Texas (METRO) provides public transportation to the area. Line 75, originally known as The Energy Corridor Connector, operates during weekdays. The line, which began service on January 25, 2010, transports people who work and/or live in the corridor to area businesses and restaurants. People coming from Downtown Houston and Midtown Houston can connect to the 75 connector via 228 Addicks and 229 Kingsland/Addicks through the Addicks Park and Ride. The 75 connector also connects with routes along Westheimer Road and Memorial Drive. In January 2011, the name of the route was changed to 75 Eldridge Crosstown, and the southern terminus of the line was extended to Mission Bend Park and Ride, enabling more convenient connections with the Westchase district and the International Corridor/New Chinatown area.

Or move to Spring Valley Village.

/Houstonian by birth :-)
 
2013-10-29 02:33:05 PM

The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.


I used to feel to feel the same way. I purchased my home a couple mile from where I worked and then my employer relocated 10 miles away.

Add in a significant other, it gets even more complicated. Mine works downtown and my job moved to a tech center on the opposite side of town. Luckily, a train line will open a few blocks away in a year and we'll both be able to commute by train.

The guy from the article lives at the mid-point between his job and his wife's job.

Our economy shifts too quickly and has sprawled too widely to make it realistic to pack up and buy a new house everytime a job situation. Many people are just lucky to have a job and can't get choosey about where it's located.
 
2013-10-29 02:33:11 PM

Jarhead_h: It's real simple people, move to were you work.  If that means a cheap apartment instead of a giant mortgage, oh well. BTW you're insane to buy anything less than several acres anyway, because if you buy land you can build a shop or grow a cashcrop - something to make the land pay for itself.  A "house" is just a never ending series of expenses culminating in a market crash where you end up owing more than  it can be sold for.


Moving to where you work can be tricky if you have a significant other who also works. Also rent vs buy is very much a case-by-case. There is no one size fits all. With a 4.XX% mortgage locked for 30 years it is moderately cheaper for me to buy (where I live) than it is to rent, and that's in Year 1. Add in a few years of even modest rent inflation and it becomes considerably cheaper. That said - if you're planning on moving soon, aren't taking on a mortgage that gets you a big tax break or are in an area with cheap rental then renting might be a better choice.

trickymoo: So he goes out and gets his chickens in line. Price is 200k. My friend then offers the guy 190 makes his offer for 190 and locked it. Saturday morning, seller shows up and is in shock. 'uh what were you thinking man??'. Guy moved the shiat in 24 hours for 375k to some 50 year old lawyer who was tired of having to make the commute from Manassas.


In case anyone thinks you can buy a 3 bed apartment in Ballston for only $375k - that price is a steal and doesn't reflect the HOA dues, which will be in the range of $600 to $1200/month.
 
2013-10-29 02:33:48 PM
First of all, what's described in the article hasn't been considered a "reverse" commute in Chicago since the 1980s. That train left the station decades ago, if you'll pardon the pun. Secondly, the Metra/UPRR is a fast, comfotable way to get to work and the people quoted in TFA should quit their farking whining. An hour each morning and evening where you can read a book or play Texas Hold'em on your iPad guilt-free? Who wouldn't want that?
 
2013-10-29 02:38:31 PM

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


But see, they were doing it before it was cool, because they bought houses in the city.
 
2013-10-29 02:38:54 PM
Is this why there is so much southbound traffic in north Atlanta on I-75, I-85, and 400 late in the afternoons?  Everyone seems to be heading towardsdowntown/midtown around 5pm or so.

/I can see them while I zoom by on MARTA
 
2013-10-29 02:40:52 PM
I recently was able to get a job much closer to home. My old job was a suburb-to-suburb commute so, although it was 56 miles (one way), it didn't take much more than an hour. I never moved closer because I didn't care for living in the area around my old job and I had a good deal on housing (and still do) where I live.

I love my new job so much. I can bike or even walk to work. Also, I feel I get the best of both worlds. My town is a formerly rural, now suburban town north of New Orleans. It has a few cool restaurants and bars, a good public library system, and a very nice grocery store downtown. Plus, since it is close to New Orleans, you get cool stuff. I heard Terrence Simien and the Zydeco experience for free last Thursday. Granted, it is not Frenchmen St. in the Marigny but it does have more cool things than a typical small town.

The only major issue is that, between the many little rivers that require bridges, and the suburban sprawl hell that surrounds it, it can be hard to get in and out of town during peak hours.
 
2013-10-29 02:41:16 PM

Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.


I've got plenty more choices than those thankfully and am not in the city.
 
2013-10-29 02:41:22 PM

Jarhead_h: It's real simple people, move to were you work.  If that means a cheap apartment instead of a giant mortgage, oh well. BTW you're insane to buy anything less than several acres anyway, because if you buy land you can build a shop or grow a cashcrop - something to make the land pay for itself.  A "house" is just a never ending series of expenses culminating in a market crash where you end up owing more than  it can be sold for.


Holy shiat?!? You're right! I am going to go home tonight after my 28 mile 30 minute commute and tell the wife and kids we're moving. Thank anonymous interneter.

I'm kidding.
 
2013-10-29 02:41:45 PM

beakerxf: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

I used to feel to feel the same way. I purchased my home a couple mile from where I worked and then my employer relocated 10 miles away.

Add in a significant other, it gets even more complicated. Mine works downtown and my job moved to a tech center on the opposite side of town. Luckily, a train line will open a few blocks away in a year and we'll both be able to commute by train.

The guy from the article lives at the mid-point between his job and his wife's job.

Our economy shifts too quickly and has sprawled too widely to make it realistic to pack up and buy a new house everytime a job situation. Many people are just lucky to have a job and can't get choosey about where it's located.


Yeah, I commuted 85 miles one-way for the better part of the year.  Thankfully, it was all highway and interstate, so it was only about 75 minutes, but it was all due to marrying a woman in another town and not having any real options in between.  I immediately started looking for a new job, though, and in about a year found a job in town so my new commute is only about 15-20 minutes, even commuting into the city center.

Those saying "just get a new job" can be way off, but at the same time, it can be possible to change jobs, even in this economy.
 
2013-10-29 02:42:35 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

Some people can't afford to live within a few miles of their workplace.


Midtown ATL is rife with crime; ain't no way I'm going to live down there.
 
2013-10-29 02:42:51 PM

hausman007: trickymoo: WhiskeyBoy: lordargent:

When I moved out here for a job at the Pentagon, I looked at the apartments across the street and they wanted $2,700-3,000 for a 1000 sq ft 2 bedroom and $4,500-5,000 for a 3 br. Even not having to pay commuting costs that's ridiculous. For the price of a 3 bedroom apartment you could get a $1 million mortgage, which even in Arlington you could afford a house.

Thats true. Anymore, that sorta bank risk doesn't come lightly. But whatever, cost of living in Arlington is bananas anyways. Property taxes alone are almost 7k yearly. Yick.
 
2013-10-29 02:43:32 PM

The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.


Sometimes you don't choose to. I was transferred to another department and went from a 10 min. commute to 70 minute commute. But I did choose to live in a town that had a train line to the city so that I wouldn't have to drive.
 
2013-10-29 02:45:31 PM

busy chillin': Jarhead_h: It's real simple people, move to were you work.  If that means a cheap apartment instead of a giant mortgage, oh well. BTW you're insane to buy anything less than several acres anyway, because if you buy land you can build a shop or grow a cashcrop - something to make the land pay for itself.  A "house" is just a never ending series of expenses culminating in a market crash where you end up owing more than  it can be sold for.

Holy shiat?!? You're right! I am going to go home tonight after my 28 mile 30 minute commute and tell the wife and kids we're moving. Thank anonymous interneter.

I'm kidding.


Weigh the positives and negatives
Make the decision based on what you value.

Why do people think there is one correct answer to a "problem" like this?
 
2013-10-29 02:47:02 PM

Pilikia: First of all, what's described in the article hasn't been considered a "reverse" commute in Chicago since the 1980s. That train left the station decades ago, if you'll pardon the pun. Secondly, the Metra/UPRR is a fast, comfotable way to get to work and the people quoted in TFA should quit their farking whining. An hour each morning and evening where you can read a book or play Texas Hold'em on your iPad guilt-free? Who wouldn't want that?


2 hours a day? no, no thanks.
 
2013-10-29 02:50:19 PM

drdank: Using an iambic keyer or a regular cw key?


I only use a straight key.  Here is my mobile set-up:

i40.tinypic.com

Are you a ham?
 
2013-10-29 02:51:00 PM

denverstevens: aerojockey: I have a 30 minute commute for a 20 mile drive on the goddamn 405.

/smug smog

FTFY


i do not miss the 405/101 interchange nor do i miss the cahuenga pass, that was a nightmare.
 
2013-10-29 02:52:23 PM

barneyfifesbullet: it can take 45 minutes to two hours to get to and from work

Nice culture you have there.



When I lived in Dallas many, many moons ago, the distance from my apartment to my office downtown was 15 miles.  When there was no traffic, I could get to work in 15 minutes (no surprise...it was all freeway driving).  However, if I tried to drive during rush hour, it would easily take me 1.5-2 hours each direction.  And it was PAINFUL.

I eventually started leaving for work a couple hours before morning rush hour, usually around 6am.  I'd then drive to the Denny's located about one block from my office, have some coffee, maybe a bite to eat, and read the paper.  It sucked waking up so early, but it was far more pleasant and less stressful than hours of stop-and-go traffic.
 
2013-10-29 02:52:48 PM

NEPAman: What band were you on?


10 Meters.  It's been opening up consistently well for about a month or so now.

It's still the only HF band I have in the car.  The other two radios are a 6 Meter all-mode rig (Yaesu FT-690RII) and a 2 Meter FM only (Yaesu FT1900R).
 
2013-10-29 02:52:53 PM

Saul T. Balzac: Is this why there is so much southbound traffic in north Atlanta on I-75, I-85, and 400 late in the afternoons?  Everyone seems to be heading towardsdowntown/midtown around 5pm or so.

/I can see them while I zoom by on MARTA


Nope, those are the smart ones who are heading back to civilization in TN.
 
2013-10-29 02:53:08 PM

KAzaMM: 4 mile commute. Less than ten minutes everyday. Have a nice day.


Yep. 3.9 miles to be exact. On the way home I jump right on then right off the highway for a whopping six minute door knob to door knob commute. Best farking decision I ever made on a place to live
 
2013-10-29 02:53:27 PM

HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.


Yeah, silly me! Why didn't I think to move from my affordable home to a city whose shiattiest houses START at $1 million?

Thanks for the tip, asshat!

/asshat
 
2013-10-29 02:53:36 PM
or northbound
or something
 
2013-10-29 02:54:56 PM

BEER_ME_in_CT: I wish I was a city person, my commute would be almost zero. Unfortunately, I love to live out in the woods as far as possibly which equals a horrendous commute daily for me. Wish I could find a well paying job in the boonies. As soon as I do I will be alot happier. Why you would want to live in the city and commute out of it is beyond me.



Maybe get a small place in the city during the week, and keep a cabin out in the boonies for the weekends?
 
kth
2013-10-29 02:55:11 PM
I have an hour commute each way. But that's because my husband's work and my work are 60 miles away from each other. We've chosen to have me commute, since he is working towards tenure, and I'm able to work from home one day per week (sometimes two).  Once he makes tenure, we'll probably split the difference a bit.
 
2013-10-29 02:55:34 PM

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


I'll have you know I have to go DOWN a flight of stairs for my morning coffee, then UP two flights of stairs to my home office computer.  It's a brutal slog, made none the worse by inclement weather; generally, I have to wear slippers, because the slate floor down there is pretty chilly in winter.

Maybe I should move closer to the kitchen...
 
2013-10-29 02:56:03 PM

tuna fingers: I used to fark this chick that caught the same morning bus as me.

/she was ugly.


What bus line?
 
2013-10-29 02:56:35 PM

noitsnot: dittybopper: Jim_Callahan: Wouldn't a reverse commute be driving away from work at the start of the work-day, then returning to work at the end of the work-day, i.e. the night shift?

This is just a normal commute, the destination being in the suburbs doesn't actually make it not a commute.

This.  Your commute is scalar, not a vector.

Please don't do that.


This is *FARK*, man.  It was built specifically for the purpose of doing things like that.
 
2013-10-29 02:56:46 PM

Saul T. Balzac: BEER_ME_in_CT: I wish I was a city person, my commute would be almost zero. Unfortunately, I love to live out in the woods as far as possibly which equals a horrendous commute daily for me. Wish I could find a well paying job in the boonies. As soon as I do I will be alot happier. Why you would want to live in the city and commute out of it is beyond me.


Maybe get a small place in the city during the week, and keep a cabin out in the boonies for the weekends?


Seriously. And if you can't afford to own or rent two places just borrow money from your parents.
 
2013-10-29 02:56:55 PM
Sometimes a reverse commute is better...

images3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-10-29 02:57:06 PM

brantgoose: Reverse commuting sounds almost good to me. I've seen the highways during rush hour--backed up for blocks in one direction only with scarcely a car going the other way. If you're in the car going the other way, life is sweet, man!

It is not enough for that successful man that other people have to fail, they have to be seen to fail. To paraphrase a famous quip.

Mind you, I don't commute at all. I walk to and from work, 2.5 kilometers each way


European typing detected.
 
2013-10-29 02:59:02 PM

Spanky3woods: KAzaMM: 4 mile commute. Less than ten minutes everyday. Have a nice day.

Yep. 3.9 miles to be exact. On the way home I jump right on then right off the highway for a whopping six minute door knob to door knob commute. Best farking decision I ever made on a place to live


I bought a house 2 miles from my job.  Then I got laid off.  So I found a job even closer.  And then I got laid off.  Now I work 50 miles away from home.

And it's still cheaper to commute than it would be to move close to my work.
 
2013-10-29 02:59:10 PM
mr. teeny works an hour away. He's had the job for 7 months now, and he stays at his parents house and commutes home Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays/Saturdays depending on if he has a project to finish.

It blows. It took us a few months to save for the money to move into a rental closer to his work, but the hunt for the actual house continues because finding the one that works for us that's in our budget is proving to be a major pain in the ass. For example, what the fark is up with the trend of a 4 bedroom house with a kitchen the size of a small bathroom and a food pantry the size of a grocery store endcap? And why are bedrooms so goddamn small that a bunk bed takes up 2/3 of the entire space? And somewhere along the line, someone decided that in a house with 4 bedrooms, a breakfast nook is sufficient dining space.

If we don't find something soon, we're just going to keep our current commuting system for a while longer and working towards buying a home instead. It's going to take longer, but we'll get more house paying a mortgage than rent.
 
2013-10-29 03:01:52 PM
"Nothing to do in the suburbs"

I keep seeing this phrase pop up when people defend living in the city, as if people who are burdened with a commute - traveling to the city - are somehow incapable of traveling to some place, I don't know where, and doing things.  Is it that suburbs are simply block-to-block residential districts , with no industry, manufacturing, commerce, entertainment, nothing but driveway and front lawn until you magically cross some threshold and you're "downtown", that also stop all travel except when you're going to work?

<sarcasm>Naw, they aren't biased at all.</sarcasm>

Look, there are some people that cherish a 'city life'.  I know folks who don't own driver's license, much less a car, have never used the stove in their apartment, and the only thing in their fridge is liquor, soda, and bottled water.  They parrot these things like badges of honor.  They enjoy the fact that they treat nearly 100% of their income as disposable, and despite the higher costs for food, housing, reliance on public transport, and a disproportionately larger part of their budget spent on entertainment.  Perhaps because they can go get drunk at bars and clubs and not have to drive home is enough to allow them to feel privileged and happy, even if it does mean paying yet more money for a taxi.  Though in retrospect, I've seen a lot of people throw up on a subway...

There are also people who enjoy living away from constant noise, people, and traffic, who actually like to look at the night sky and see stars instead of just reflections of neon and billboards off glass-fronted skyscrapers.  Folks who like being able to modify their house to suit their needs, to build a tree fort for their kids, to take a nice bike ride without having to suck exhaust and dodge both cars and people in a slow, lethal crawl.  Maybe they live minutes or less from a river or lake, a forest, a mountain, a baseball diamond, a soccer field, a playground, schools not covered in graffiti,where neighbors, shopkeepers and even police smile and greet you by name.  Property is half or less the cost of an apartment half the size or less.  On the downside, almost nothing is less than a 15 minute round trip away.

Personally, I find the idea of having to share a wall with one or more other people an irritation - both to my own noise generation, as well as theirs.  I find the idea of being beholden to a bus or train schedule fairly limiting, especially when it often takes multiple transfers and waits.  Simply buying material goods is harder; I currently spend an hour a week shopping for the entire following week, but if I don't have a car, I'm limited to what I can carry in two hands and I have to spend 30 minutes to an hour every other day.  Ever try to buy a couch in downtown NYC, or a bed mattress?  (Note: do not be the guy in the office with a car, or worse, a truck - to you beggars, F-off, coworkers are not your delivery service.  Pay 100$ for that, take a day off work for the delivery window and wait 4 weeks for your lack of foresight and life decisions).

Yeah, there's compromises to be made, like a commute and living with an HOA, and lawn mowing, and so on - but there's compromises in the other direction too.  It all comes down to priorities.  I can't argue for the city life in this case, but that's because I'm biased against it.  My priorities are in the other direction.  Still, at least I'm aware that I'm completely biased, and don't claim my opinions or personal experience are facts or apples-to-apples comparisons.
 
2013-10-29 03:02:17 PM

dittybopper: drdank: Using an iambic keyer or a regular cw key?

I only use a straight key.  Here is my mobile set-up:

[i40.tinypic.com image 640x480]

Are you a ham?


That is the most interesting (as a tech guy) and disturbing (as a normal person) thing I've seen today. Does sending Morse Code fall under texting while driving rules?

Your alternator must love you.
 
2013-10-29 03:03:47 PM

Rent Party: bopis: Rent Party: Chicago is one of the few midwestern cities I'd move to, primarily because of the CTA.  I love those trains, and it's a great town.

I used to love the CTA until I had to use it everyday.

I just spent a week in Oak Park, and rode the green line into the city center and back every day.  All I could think was "man, I could do this every day."

What happens if you do that every day for months on end?


Well, if you're me, you get a lot of reading done.  I mean, a LOT of reading.  I spend about an hour on the L every work day.  Over the past few years, I've read War and Peace, Les Miserables, Buddenbrooks, a selection of novels by James M. Cain, Raymond Chandler, and Dashiell Hammett, various non-fiction works, and the Bible.  As a result, I am now, officially, better than everyone else.  I look at other people on the train who sit there with their hands folded on their laps, doing absolutely nothing, and I weep silently for them.
 
2013-10-29 03:07:47 PM
I love my "reverse" commute -- primarily because I get to watch everyone stuck in traffic going the other way.

Nothing brightens up the day like some good ol' morning Schadenfreud.
 
2013-10-29 03:11:43 PM

quietwalker: "Nothing to do in the suburbs"

I keep seeing this phrase pop up when people defend living in the city, as if people who are burdened with a commute - traveling to the city - are somehow incapable of traveling to some place, I don't know where, and doing things.  Is it that suburbs are simply block-to-block residential districts , with no industry, manufacturing, commerce, entertainment, nothing but driveway and front lawn until you magically cross some threshold and you're "downtown", that also stop all travel except when you're going to work?

<sarcasm>Naw, they aren't biased at all.</sarcasm>

Look, there are some people that cherish a 'city life'.  I know folks who don't own driver's license, much less a car, have never used the stove in their apartment, and the only thing in their fridge is liquor, soda, and bottled water.  They parrot these things like badges of honor.  They enjoy the fact that they treat nearly 100% of their income as disposable, and despite the higher costs for food, housing, reliance on public transport, and a disproportionately larger part of their budget spent on entertainment.  Perhaps because they can go get drunk at bars and clubs and not have to drive home is enough to allow them to feel privileged and happy, even if it does mean paying yet more money for a taxi.  Though in retrospect, I've seen a lot of people throw up on a subway...

There are also people who enjoy living away from constant noise, people, and traffic, who actually like to look at the night sky and see stars instead of just reflections of neon and billboards off glass-fronted skyscrapers.  Folks who like being able to modify their house to suit their needs, to build a tree fort for their kids, to take a nice bike ride without having to suck exhaust and dodge both cars and people in a slow, lethal crawl.  Maybe they live minutes or less from a river or lake, a forest, a mountain, a baseball diamond, a soccer field, a playground, schools not covered in graf ...


Yeah, that is what I was kind of saying in my post. In the downtown of my little town north of New Orleans, there is a good Thai restaurant, a good Italian one, a oyster bar/fried seafood joint, a po-boy place justly famous for their roast-beef po-boys, a great coffee house (independent, not sbux), a tap room (bar/pub/thing), the main public library of the Parish (read County) system, a great little restaurant that does locavore/healthish stuff, a dive bar, two lunch breakfast cafes...

That is all without having to venture out of downtown and into strip-mall hell (this does surround the town) and this is a small town. It does help that it is the Parish/County seat and is an older small town. You don't have to go to the big city for fun.
 
2013-10-29 03:16:53 PM

BigNumber12: bdub77: With a picture of someone slogging through their terrible commute:

[media.npr.org image 850x476]
Nice brooch. Beats by Dre guy looks like he needs to shovel some more coffee into his mouth.

Metra seats face inward?! That's awkward.

/ Caltrain is better
// not the new cars, though


If you look closely, you'll see that's the upper level of a gallery coach; main level seats face fore/aft.

/Caltrain is peewee league compared to Metra
//rode Caltrain for years between SF and Hayward Park
 
2013-10-29 03:17:00 PM

WinoRhino: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

I bought a house out in the suburbs. I'm a 10 minute walk to the commuter rail into downtown Boston. 30 minute ride. I used to just hang out in town after work and then take a train home later in the evening. Best of both worlds.

Anyhow, the article amused me. I love it when people say they're "city people" but are annoyed about having to share roads and other public resources with a lot of other people.


Would like to point out here that the commuter rail is COMPLETELY different than the other public transportation here in Boston. My wife takes the Red Line from Quincy to Boston and most people on there are just complete trash with no manners or class. Every day she sees a pregnant woman or elderly person standing while a bunch of able bodied younger people pretend not to notice them. Of course you have the thugs, junkies and crazy homeless along for the ride too, what a nightmare.
 
2013-10-29 03:19:18 PM

dittybopper: NEPAman: What band were you on?

10 Meters.  It's been opening up consistently well for about a month or so now.

It's still the only HF band I have in the car.  The other two radios are a 6 Meter all-mode rig (Yaesu FT-690RII) and a 2 Meter FM only (Yaesu FT1900R).


Cool, I was able to make a string of 10-meter contacts from my apartment (ground level, single story unit) in downtown Fort Worth, including one to Argentina.  That one I was ecstatic about.  It demonstrated the fickle nature of 10 meters to me since most of my QSOs are to the northeast, Georgia/Florida, and west.  I do mostly digital work, JT65 and JT9.

Hope we can have a Fark QSO party again sometime soon!
 
2013-10-29 03:19:59 PM

kendelrio: For the record, I live ~140 miles from work. My commute takes 2 1/2-3 hours.

/but I only do it once a month.


Farks first congressman just got outed
 
2013-10-29 03:20:01 PM
I'm a double super secret reverse anti-commuter.  I live in the suburbs and work 4 minutes away from my home.  booya!
 
2013-10-29 03:23:20 PM

Smackledorfer: I'm a double super secret reverse anti-commuter.  I live in the suburbs and work 4 minutes away from my home.  booya!


SmackledorferFTW!!
 
2013-10-29 03:24:29 PM

Smackledorfer: I'm a double super secret reverse anti-commuter.  I live in the suburbs and work 4 minutes away from my home.  booya!


I'm a double super secret reverse hipster. I live in the coolest part of an urban setting and drive 20 miles to the strip mall hell hole to eat Applebee's! Booya!
 
2013-10-29 03:27:22 PM

Rex Kramer - Danger Seeker: WinoRhino: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

I bought a house out in the suburbs. I'm a 10 minute walk to the commuter rail into downtown Boston. 30 minute ride. I used to just hang out in town after work and then take a train home later in the evening. Best of both worlds.

Anyhow, the article amused me. I love it when people say they're "city people" but are annoyed about having to share roads and other public resources with a lot of other people.

Would like to point out here that the commuter rail is COMPLETELY different than the other public transportation here in Boston. My wife takes the Red Line from Quincy to Boston and most people on there are just complete trash with no manners or class. Every day she sees a pregnant woman or elderly person standing while a bunch of able bodied younger people pretend not to notice them. Of course you have the thugs, junkies and crazy homeless along for the ride too, what a nightmare.


Shockingly commuter rail in Philadelphia is generally classy and pleasant. I took it for about six months before moving to telecommuting (best commute ever), and I only dealt with one crazy person.

The schadenfreude of seeing others in traffic while you're going the other direction is great, until you realize you've left your work laptop at home and have to commute back in to get it, then back out.
 
2013-10-29 03:33:22 PM

LibertyHiller: If you look closely, you'll see that's the upper level of a gallery coach; main level seats face fore/aft.


No, I get it - it's the same basic single-lower/double-upper layout as Caltrain's old Nippon Sharyo stock. It's just strange that they have their upper deck seats oriented so that legs block the aisle. I'm sure that you can pack more people in that way, but what a farking nightmare for riders.
 
2013-10-29 03:34:30 PM

Rex Kramer - Danger Seeker: WinoRhino: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

I bought a house out in the suburbs. I'm a 10 minute walk to the commuter rail into downtown Boston. 30 minute ride. I used to just hang out in town after work and then take a train home later in the evening. Best of both worlds.

Anyhow, the article amused me. I love it when people say they're "city people" but are annoyed about having to share roads and other public resources with a lot of other people.

Would like to point out here that the commuter rail is COMPLETELY different than the other public transportation here in Boston. My wife takes the Red Line from Quincy to Boston and most people on there are just complete trash with no manners or class. Every day she sees a pregnant woman or elderly person standing while a bunch of able bodied younger people pretend not to notice them. Of course you have the thugs, junkies and crazy homeless along for the ride too, what a nightmare.


Not my experience.  I used to ride the Red Line every day and I saw people get up for older riders all the time.

Ever ride the commuter rail in the morning?  With all the dickheads that pretend to sleep in the two seaters so nobody sits next to them?  Or sit on the outside of a three seater and pretend to sleep?

There are douche bags everywhere.
 
2013-10-29 03:35:18 PM

trickymoo: I lived in downtown DC. farking terrible TERRIBLE traffic yeah? But I worked up in Greenbelt, MD. 20 Miles northeast of town.

Every single blessed morning, in the car, out the door and going 60 the whoooole way up the BW Parkway, just gloriously flipping off every sad sonofabiatch who was stuck in bumper to bumer on the other side of the road. It was possibly the greatest part of my day.

Hey, wanna take a guess what happened at 5 pm on my way home??? :-D MORE FLIPPAGGGEEE!!!!1!!!1!!! Took me 25 minutes to get home.

Suck it.


The world has treated you very poorly hasn't it trickeymoo? Do you want to talk about it?
 
2013-10-29 03:35:54 PM

The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.


How about feeling bad for someone who chose to work 4 miles from home, and whose multinational company spun off their division and sold it to a competitor (whose owner the CEO just happens to be friends with) whose office is 36 miles away? Oh yeah, and who can't get a job with a different competitor because the GOP's budget antics have thrown a huge wet blanket on our whole industry...

Because that's what happened to me. I didn't WANT a long commute and I found a job without one - only to get dicked over by business buddies of Mitt Romney (literally) and then have my options dry up while the Tea Party douchebags fark us up with the sequester then throw salt in the wound with the shutdown.

I'm just am trying to suck it up for the time being and hoping that next year folks will be hiring again in my industry.
 
2013-10-29 03:36:23 PM

Gunny Highway: There are douche bags everywhere.


So I dont sound like someone who is a hater of humanity; good, kind people far out weight them everywhere.

Every option has pros and cons.
 
2013-10-29 03:36:27 PM

dittybopper: drdank: Using an iambic keyer or a regular cw key?

I only use a straight key.  Here is my mobile set-up:

[i40.tinypic.com image 640x480]

Are you a ham?


Holy hell. As if it's not bad enough dealing with the farking texters on the road, now we have people like you dot-dashing away when they should be watching the road. What's next? Keeping a coop in the backseat to send messages via carrier pigeons? How about smoke signals from your radiator? Maybe jungle drums? Just boost your sub-woofer and you could let everyone know that you are an accident waiting to happen.

Hey, Western Union Man, keep your hands on the wheel or switch to Pony Express so the rest of us feel safer, OK?
 
2013-10-29 03:39:26 PM

pedobearapproved: Pilikia: First of all, what's described in the article hasn't been considered a "reverse" commute in Chicago since the 1980s. That train left the station decades ago, if you'll pardon the pun. Secondly, the Metra/UPRR is a fast, comfotable way to get to work and the people quoted in TFA should quit their farking whining. An hour each morning and evening where you can read a book or play Texas Hold'em on your iPad guilt-free? Who wouldn't want that?

2 hours a day? no, no thanks.


*shrug*

I both lived and worked in the city (just 5 miles from my job) my first 8 years in Chicago. I rode my bike, I walked, I took the El and the bus, I cabbed it, I drove, and all the various combinations thereof. Sometimes my commute was 15 minutes, sometimes it was 90 minutes; the maddening thing about it was the unpredictability. I was always early or late, and not just for work.

Now I live 17 miles from my office in the loop and my commute is 55 minutes door-to-door each way 99% of the time: 10 minute walk from house to train, 30 minute train ride, 15 minute walk from train to office.

Same train gets me downtown on weekends for shows and good eats, and serves as my designated driver after particularly drinky White Sox games.

So I ask again, what's not to like? The predictability of my commute allows me to be spontaneous with my social planning.
 
2013-10-29 03:48:19 PM
Is there even a reverse commute in Los Angeles?  I've been stuck on plenty of freeways (especially the 405 - pretty much most of the day - Mon - Fri) - where both directions are totally farked up.
 
2013-10-29 03:49:13 PM

van1ty: I have a 90 minute commute one way every day.  Easily spend 120 bucks a week in gas.


Personally, I would sooner kill myself.

My commute is, absolute worst case, 40 minutes one way. I have a bus with wifi I take most days though, and if I drive and aim to miss traffic the commute is more like 25 minutes on way. IMHO this is a long commute. 90 minutes is insanity.
 
2013-10-29 03:53:06 PM

mongbiohazard: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

How about feeling bad for someone who chose to work 4 miles from home, and whose multinational company spun off their division and sold it to a competitor (whose owner the CEO just happens to be friends with) whose office is 36 miles away? Oh yeah, and who can't get a job with a different competitor because the GOP's budget antics have thrown a huge wet blanket on our whole industry...

Because that's what happened to me. I didn't WANT a long commute and I found a job without one - only to get dicked over by business buddies of Mitt Romney (literally) and then have my options dry up while the Tea Party douchebags fark us up with the sequester then throw salt in the wound with the shutdown.

I'm just am trying to suck it up for the time being and hoping that next year folks will be hiring again in my industry.


Literally dicked by them?
 
2013-10-29 03:56:37 PM

YixilTesiphon: durbnpoisn: YixilTesiphon: durbnpoisn: But nowadays, my commute couldn't exactly be defined either way.  I drive through an urban area.  So for the 1st half, I get stuck in traffic, until I make it through Trenton.  Then I cross the bridge, and the traffic coming from PA is a gridlock trying to get to Trenton.

So what's the cool new term for that sort of commute?

Why the fark would you live in New Jersey if your job is in Pennsylvania? Spouse works in NYC?

Because try to sell a house in NJ.  We would lose so much money it's not even worth trying.

Can't even rent it out? I feel like at some point it must be worth it just to walk away from a mortgage. That's what my neighbors did - they spent $400k in 2006 on a house very similar to one I bought for $190k last year. Shortly after I bought they seem to have just signed it over to the bank.


Have you tried wearing clothes and closing the drapes? ;) I keed I keed.
 
2013-10-29 04:25:29 PM

Contents Under Pressure: I laugh a schadenfreudey laugh at all the people who moved to the suburbs to get away from the... um... and then discovered that what they ran away from followed them, because non-whites appreciate lower housing prices, too.


That's what housing covenants were for.  Then the damned legal system and them judges ruined a good thing.
 
2013-10-29 04:28:14 PM

SirEattonHogg: Is there even a reverse commute in Los Angeles?  I've been stuck on plenty of freeways (especially the 405 - pretty much most of the day - Mon - Fri) - where both directions are totally farked up.


I have a friend who's a prof at Harvey Mudd.  He and his wife live in Brentwood near her place of employment, though, and he does the reverse commute.
 
2013-10-29 04:34:51 PM

dittybopper: drdank: Using an iambic keyer or a regular cw key?

I only use a straight key.  Here is my mobile set-up:

[i40.tinypic.com image 640x480]

Are you a ham?


I may spend the rest of my days wondering what things I know nothing about are happening in the cars around me.
 
2013-10-29 04:51:53 PM
My commute goes from my bedroom to my home office, with stops at the bathroom and coffee maker. Never been so productive in my life.

Melissa Mayer can kiss my ass.
 
2013-10-29 05:09:52 PM

NEPAman: dittybopper: NEPAman: What band were you on?

10 Meters.  It's been opening up consistently well for about a month or so now.

It's still the only HF band I have in the car.  The other two radios are a 6 Meter all-mode rig (Yaesu FT-690RII) and a 2 Meter FM only (Yaesu FT1900R).

Cool, I was able to make a string of 10-meter contacts from my apartment (ground level, single story unit) in downtown Fort Worth, including one to Argentina.  That one I was ecstatic about.  It demonstrated the fickle nature of 10 meters to me since most of my QSOs are to the northeast, Georgia/Florida, and west.  I do mostly digital work, JT65 and JT9.

Hope we can have a Fark QSO party again sometime soon!


I'm taking my tech exam next month.   I can do the technical stuff in my sleep, but the lingo and the legalities over bandwidth assignment are screwing me up something bad.
 
2013-10-29 05:15:30 PM

listernine: kendelrio: For the record, I live ~140 miles from work. My commute takes 2 1/2-3 hours.

/but I only do it once a month.

Farks first congressman just got outed


Shhhhh! Don't tell!!
 
2013-10-29 06:16:22 PM

NEPAman: dittybopper: El Morro: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

Yeah... because it's just that easy.  You ass.

In any case, I had a 3 hour round trip commute for a while.  It was hell.   My condolences to those of you on that kind of grind. These days, if a song starts on the radio when I get in my car, it's still playing when I pull into the parking lot at my job.  It's tough to put into words just how wonderful a short commute is.  It's a quality of life issue, really.

Meh.

I spend 2 hours a day in my car, an hour to work in the morning, and an hour back home.

In the morning, traffic is light, and I either chat on the radio with my local ham radio buddies, or I listen to Morning Edition on NPR to catch up on the news.  On the ride home, I get on the long-range radio if propagation is there, or I listen to All Things Considered.

Just yesterday I spent most of my commute "talking" to Wayne N5YFC down near Baton Rouge, LA.  I put talking in quotes because we were using Morse.  Anyway, being able to talk to new and interesting people and places adds a bit of excitement to the commute.

The only time it's "brutal" is in the winter when I have to drive slow and it takes twice as long, and just occasionally when there is a particularly bad accident.

What band were you on?


You probably never heard of it...
 
2013-10-29 06:50:16 PM
Reverse commuting when Cookie rings the dinner bell ..

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-10-29 07:11:35 PM

HailRobonia: If you;'re a woman and live in the city but commute to the country for your cattle herding job, does that make you a reverse cowgirl?


End of thread
 
2013-10-29 07:30:53 PM
Wouldn't a reverse commute be you living at work and the work comes to you?  Like a shop owner with living space above, where all you got to do is open in the morning and the customers and deliveries come to you.  Think about it, it would still suck if you don't have any employees, you can't leave during business hours as you are trapped in the extension of your home.  Kind of like simply working at home, but with having to actually dress and behave professionally while having that trapped feeling.
 
2013-10-29 07:43:38 PM

BEER_ME_in_CT: I wish I was a city person, my commute would be almost zero. Unfortunately, I love to live out in the woods as far as possibly which equals a horrendous commute daily for me. Wish I could find a well paying job in the boonies. As soon as I do I will be alot happier. Why you would want to live in the city and commute out of it is beyond me.


Amen.
 
2013-10-29 07:44:28 PM
Is it really a reverse commute when 70% of the region's jobs are outside of the city core? Sounds like a normal commute.

/Reverse commuting in Houston was great until I had to do several months of night shift.
//Suburbs aren't so bad either
///things come in 3's
 
2013-10-29 08:39:44 PM

Rent Party: NEPAman: dittybopper: NEPAman: What band were you on?

10 Meters.  It's been opening up consistently well for about a month or so now.

It's still the only HF band I have in the car.  The other two radios are a 6 Meter all-mode rig (Yaesu FT-690RII) and a 2 Meter FM only (Yaesu FT1900R).

Cool, I was able to make a string of 10-meter contacts from my apartment (ground level, single story unit) in downtown Fort Worth, including one to Argentina.  That one I was ecstatic about.  It demonstrated the fickle nature of 10 meters to me since most of my QSOs are to the northeast, Georgia/Florida, and west.  I do mostly digital work, JT65 and JT9.

Hope we can have a Fark QSO party again sometime soon!

I'm taking my tech exam next month.   I can do the technical stuff in my sleep, but the lingo and the legalities over bandwidth assignment are screwing me up something bad.


I let my tech expire.  I got it back when code was still required.  I'm still surprised I passed that part of the test because I sucked at code (that's morse code for you non-hams).  The other part of the test was easy.
 
2013-10-29 08:50:46 PM

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


This.  It is about as retarded a term as reverse discrimination.  It "commuting" and "discrimination." No reverse about it.
 
2013-10-29 09:31:38 PM
I guess I have a forward-reverse commute since I drive from the suburbs, through the city, out past the far-side suburbs and out to BFE where my job is.
 
2013-10-29 10:22:55 PM

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


Came here to say this, only louder and with more swear words.
 
2013-10-29 10:48:28 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: HMS_Blinkin: The My Little Pony Killer: I have a hard time feeling bad for somebody who chooses to work 35 miles away from where they live.

This.  Just move closer to your job.  Crazy concept, I know.

Some people can't afford to live within a few miles of their workplace.


Maids, for example.
 
2013-10-29 10:56:05 PM

brantgoose: Reverse commuting sounds almost good to me. I've seen the highways during rush hour--backed up for blocks in one direction only with scarcely a car going the other way. If you're in the car going the other way, life is sweet, man!

It is not enough for that successful man that other people have to fail, they have to be seen to fail. To paraphrase a famous quip.

Mind you, I don't commute at all. I walk to and from work, 2.5 kilometers each way in roughly the time it would take to go by bus. Even better than driving past people stuck in a traffic jam--walking past people stuck in a traffic jam. But I try to avoid traffic altogether as I am a bit asthmatic and the smog makes me gag sometimes.

Even picking my way through the snow in other people's footprints is better than being jammed in a bus full of hot people in winter clothing that turns the air into something you'd expect in a laundry or in a mud room full of sweaters and mittens and wet boots.


This reminded me of this.

www.rtfa.net
Is that you with the walker?

I keed, I keed. You are one of my favorites. Always enjoy your posts.
 
2013-10-29 11:09:52 PM

nekom: Stop making up unnecessary words.  This isn't "reverse" commuting, it's commuting.  Unless you work from home you commute, no matter where that's to or from.


Spoken like a true Reverse Racist, sir.
 
2013-10-29 11:43:16 PM

Rex Kramer - Danger Seeker: WinoRhino: Swedgin: It's still worth it because once you're home you're in the city, and your meal/entertainment choices are much better than Applebee's or Chili's on a Friday night.

I bought a house out in the suburbs. I'm a 10 minute walk to the commuter rail into downtown Boston. 30 minute ride. I used to just hang out in town after work and then take a train home later in the evening. Best of both worlds.

Anyhow, the article amused me. I love it when people say they're "city people" but are annoyed about having to share roads and other public resources with a lot of other people.

Would like to point out here that the commuter rail is COMPLETELY different than the other public transportation here in Boston. My wife takes the Red Line from Quincy to Boston and most people on there are just complete trash with no manners or class. Every day she sees a pregnant woman or elderly person standing while a bunch of able bodied younger people pretend not to notice them. Of course you have the thugs, junkies and crazy homeless along for the ride too, what a nightmare.


That sounds exactly like riding the Portland Max, except that there's more of a light urine smell. But you eventually get to recognize the usual Freaks of Portland at your stop like old, filthy friends, and embrace the concept of beautiful urban diversity and just take in the passing human comedy, and just laugh.

Because we're all stoned.
 
2013-10-30 12:05:14 AM

SirEattonHogg: Is there even a reverse commute in Los Angeles?  I've been stuck on plenty of freeways (especially the 405 - pretty much most of the day - Mon - Fri) - where both directions are totally farked up.


Los Angeles was the first metro to spread out so far that the jobs started following the suburbs. A lot of other big cities caught up in the 80's and 90's, like Chicago, and now it's pretty rare to find a big metro where reverse commute is a huge win. Some small cities still exist in a time warp where it's a slam dunk, though.
 
2013-10-30 04:21:27 AM

sure haven't: You're right, he should 'choose' to get a job at a labratory closer to his house. Say, right next door. That would be totally ideal. What a moron, right?


Well living where he does, any 'lab next door' isn't exactly hewing to state and local regulations.

The Ocho: Is it really a reverse commute when 70% of the region's jobs are outside of the city core? Sounds like a normal commute.


My take is in the period after the great exodus to the suburbs, businesses were often slow to follow, so every morning dad would get in the car and drive into work. Eventually businesses opened up outside the city cores which provided some an opportunity to commute in against the normal flow. Okay so now businesses have spread out enough that commuting is just one big cluster fark.

Big deal.

\Did the reverse commute from San Jose to Santa Cruz in the 80's.
\\Half hour commute vs an hour or more.
\\\Still brutal.
 
2013-10-30 08:39:33 AM

Rex Kramer - Danger Seeker: trickymoo: I lived in downtown DC. farking terrible TERRIBLE traffic yeah? But I worked up in Greenbelt, MD. 20 Miles northeast of town.

Every single blessed morning, in the car, out the door and going 60 the whoooole way up the BW Parkway, just gloriously flipping off every sad sonofabiatch who was stuck in bumper to bumer on the other side of the road. It was possibly the greatest part of my day.

Hey, wanna take a guess what happened at 5 pm on my way home??? :-D MORE FLIPPAGGGEEE!!!!1!!!1!!! Took me 25 minutes to get home.

Suck it.

The world has treated you very poorly hasn't it trickeymoo? Do you want to talk about it?


THE MAN ON THE METRO TOUCHED MY RAGE BUTTON.

NEVAR AGIN
 
2013-10-30 01:18:39 PM

KAzaMM: 4 mile commute. Less than ten minutes everyday. Have a nice day.


I walk three blocks. You have a nice day, too.
 
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