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(YouTube)   If you're still looking for your dachshund that mysteriously vanished in South Carolina 35 years ago, archaeologists examining a flooded Cold War family fallout shelter in Aiken County may have some answers for you   (youtube.com) divider line 21
    More: Interesting, Aiken County, South Carolina 35, Cold War, Helter Shelter, South Carolina, time capsule, Film Festivals, shadows  
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2661 clicks; posted to Video » on 28 Oct 2013 at 4:32 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-10-28 04:05:08 PM  
Hot dog floating in water for 35 years found in South Carolina convenience store.
 
2013-10-28 05:05:54 PM  
That's an interesting video. I live in Spartanburg County, SC and we have a similar structure in our backyard. Great big heavy steel door (that has come off the hinges, anyone know a good welder?) three steel vent pipes that stick up about 4 feet, and a plastic drain tube that used to be attached to a sump pump. The thing when built had running water from the well (not used anymore but the well house is still here) and also electricity, though disconnected the outlets are still on the walls.
 
2013-10-28 05:23:17 PM  
The place to go when you hear the Victory Siren

This one gives me the willies
 
2013-10-28 05:51:08 PM  
Sorry, opening credits dragged too long, I bailed...
 
2013-10-28 06:01:15 PM  

Monkey2: we have a similar structure in our backyard


If you go down there, don't expect Oxygen.  Plan for that.
 
2013-10-28 06:01:56 PM  
gifs.gifbin.com
 
2013-10-28 06:17:44 PM  

TheHighlandHowler: Monkey2: we have a similar structure in our backyard

If you go down there, don't expect Oxygen.  Plan for that.


Heh. I've been down there a few times. It's kind of creepy and looks a lot like the one in the vid.

I had to winch the big blast door in place last Summer so it's been a while. Last I looked in there, there was about 2 feet of standing water. Until I can get it properly drained and inspected for structural integrity I don't plan on going back in there.
 
2013-10-28 06:37:23 PM  
i1124.photobucket.com You can see the entrance here on the left along with the vent pipes and the well house on the right.

The oddest thing about this photo is that it actually snowed in SC.

BTW, that is not the blast door covering the entrance, that's a temp wood frame that the previous owners covered it with. The actual blast doors requires no fewer than three really strong people to move. I am not a strong people, that's why I had to winch it in place.
 
2013-10-28 06:54:43 PM  

TheHighlandHowler: If you go down there, don't expect Oxygen. Plan for that.


If you find one of these don't enter it like they did in the video. As a Civil Engineer I inspected many structures like this (mostly utility vaults) and they are very dangerous to enter without the proper precautions. Soil is permeable to gas, both heating gas and natural methane. The gas is heaver than air and settles in the bottom of the structure often filling it. Once you go below the level of air you pass out in seconds and most often die. That's why he had the scuba gear later, he'd spoken to someone. If you find one get a pro to inspect it.

Just some reminisces about growing up in the Cold War. I was born in 1952. We were told by authority figures, our teachers, parents, and TV, that Nuclear War was imminent and that we were going to die. I don't know what psychological effect that this had on an entire generation, but no doubt we're all screwed up because of it.

At school we had weekly air raid drills. Sometimes "duck and cover" under the desk and sometimes marching to our schools designated fallout shelter. It was usually in some corner of the building's basement. It was stocked with government furnished 20 gallon barrels of water and 5 gallon sized steel cans of survival crackers and other hard food. Most public and some office buildings had fallout shelters designated by the yellow and black signs shown in the video. They were ubiquitous until the early 70's. Many building's basements that I inspected as an Engineer had the left over supplies well into the 80's.

In my mom's scrapbook is a mimeographed (look it up) pamphlet from my Kindergarten school. It explains that in the event of a Nuclear attack by those sneaky commies that we'd be bussed 50 miles away from San Francisco to an assembly point in Santa Rosa leaving our parents behind. Accompanying it was an unexecuted parental permission slip. How reassuring for a 5 year old.

During the Cuban missile crisis in 1962 (?) I was in an orphanage. One evening the dorm proctor, a priest, came into our dorm right at bedtime and told us that it was very likely that we'd be nuked that night and to be prepared to enter into Jesus' arms. He then gave confession and Holy Communion to those who wanted it.

/csb
 
2013-10-28 07:02:54 PM  
I wonder if any family of 4 (Wife, husband and 2 preteen kids)  ever tested living in one of those small 1 room shelter for 2 weeks without going outside. Add the stress of a real nuclear attack and I think the adults would crack and go for murder/suicide and never come out.  I also wonder how long the average shelters was maintained and if any were continuously maintained in a state of readiness to these days.
 
2013-10-28 07:19:56 PM  

smells_like_meat: The gas is heaver than air and settles in the bottom of the structure often filling it.


Which also means that there's a risk that the blast doors will get closed from the inside by a blast.
 
2013-10-28 09:18:45 PM  

smells_like_meat: TheHighlandHowler: If you go down there, don't expect Oxygen. Plan for that.

If you find one of these don't enter it like they did in the video. As a Civil Engineer I inspected many structures like this (mostly utility vaults) and they are very dangerous to enter without the proper precautions. Soil is permeable to gas, both heating gas and natural methane. The gas is heaver than air and settles in the bottom of the structure often filling it. Once you go below the level of air you pass out in seconds and most often die. That's why he had the scuba gear later, he'd spoken to someone. If you find one get a pro to inspect it.

Just some reminisces about growing up in the Cold War. I was born in 1952. We were told by authority figures, our teachers, parents, and TV, that Nuclear War was imminent and that we were going to die. I don't know what psychological effect that this had on an entire generation, but no doubt we're all screwed up because of it.

At school we had weekly air raid drills. Sometimes "duck and cover" under the desk and sometimes marching to our schools designated fallout shelter. It was usually in some corner of the building's basement. It was stocked with government furnished 20 gallon barrels of water and 5 gallon sized steel cans of survival crackers and other hard food. Most public and some office buildings had fallout shelters designated by the yellow and black signs shown in the video. They were ubiquitous until the early 70's. Many building's basements that I inspected as an Engineer had the left over supplies well into the 80's.

In my mom's scrapbook is a mimeographed (look it up) pamphlet from my Kindergarten school. It explains that in the event of a Nuclear attack by those sneaky commies that we'd be bussed 50 miles away from San Francisco to an assembly point in Santa Rosa leaving our parents behind. Accompanying it was an unexecuted parental permission slip. How reassuring for a 5 year old.

During the Cuban missile crisis in 1962 (?) I ...


What I can't figure out is why they didn't jump pump it clean and then force air through it for a few days.
 
2013-10-28 09:48:21 PM  

Lsherm: What I can't figure out is why they didn't jump pump it clean and then force air through it for a few days.


The only thing I can think of is that there's some archaeology rule about seeing how things lie in situ before you do anything to the site, and pumping the water out might have changed something.  (Though that didn't stop them from jumping in and splashing all around).

Those ads they spliced in of the happy family playing board games in their bomb shelter were so incredibly creepy.  I thought they were scarier than the dead dog.
 
2013-10-28 10:09:08 PM  

smells_like_meat: TheHighlandHowler: If you go down there, don't expect Oxygen. Plan for that.

If you find one of these don't enter it like they did in the video. As a Civil Engineer I inspected many structures like this (mostly utility vaults) and they are very dangerous to enter without the proper precautions. Soil is permeable to gas, both heating gas and natural methane. The gas is heaver than air and settles in the bottom of the structure often filling it. Once you go below the level of air you pass out in seconds and most often die. That's why he had the scuba gear later, he'd spoken to someone. If you find one get a pro to inspect it.

Just some reminisces about growing up in the Cold War. I was born in 1952. We were told by authority figures, our teachers, parents, and TV, that Nuclear War was imminent and that we were going to die. I don't know what psychological effect that this had on an entire generation, but no doubt we're all screwed up because of it.

At school we had weekly air raid drills. Sometimes "duck and cover" under the desk and sometimes marching to our schools designated fallout shelter. It was usually in some corner of the building's basement. It was stocked with government furnished 20 gallon barrels of water and 5 gallon sized steel cans of survival crackers and other hard food. Most public and some office buildings had fallout shelters designated by the yellow and black signs shown in the video. They were ubiquitous until the early 70's. Many building's basements that I inspected as an Engineer had the left over supplies well into the 80's.

In my mom's scrapbook is a mimeographed (look it up) pamphlet from my Kindergarten school. It explains that in the event of a Nuclear attack by those sneaky commies that we'd be bussed 50 miles away from San Francisco to an assembly point in Santa Rosa leaving our parents behind. Accompanying it was an unexecuted parental permission slip. How reassuring for a 5 year old.

During the Cuban missile crisis in 1962 (?) I ...


I'm a duck and cover kid, too

/I think being constantly told we could survive by crawling under our desks was a cruel joke
//I was smart enough to look at the damage maps and figure it out
///way too close to that SAC base
 
2013-10-28 10:48:54 PM  
I'm not afraid to admit that the thought of someone losing their dog like that, and how scared the dog must have been made me go hug mine.
 
2013-10-28 10:58:01 PM  
Anyone else hear Lionel Hutz @ 8:40?

i.imgur.com
 
2013-10-28 10:59:39 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: /I think being constantly told we could survive by crawling under our desks was a cruel joke
//I was smart enough to look at the damage maps and figure it out
///way too close to that SAC base


I'm not sure how to interpret duck-and-cover.  It could have been a sort of dark pragmatism, like "better to have them under their desks than running around in a panic," or it could have been the parents insisting that the schools "do something" to protect their kids and not accepting "there really ISN'T anything we can do" as an answer.

flgatorfan: I'm not afraid to admit that the thought of someone losing their dog like that, and how scared the dog must have been made me go hug mine.


Poor puppy must have fallen in and had no way to get back out.  With any luck (?!) the place was already flooded and it died relatively quickly of drowning, rather than starving to death.
 
2013-10-28 11:06:11 PM  

flgatorfan: I'm not afraid to admit that the thought of someone losing their dog like that, and how scared the dog must have been made me go hug mine.


I like my theory better: The dog was dropped in there already dead.
 
2013-10-28 11:50:23 PM  
Zero?
 
2013-10-29 01:42:47 AM  
Glad the had the penny against a measuring tape or I would have been surely lost as to what size it was... would have thought that 1964 was the amount of feet wide it measured.

derp
 
2013-10-29 06:26:26 PM  
I hate videos put to music. And I hated this music most of all. Still watched it as it was interesting, but come on, have some commentary or no sound at all.

Charles.
 
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