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(WebMD)   Kids with head injuries are prone to depression. Doctors recommend telling them how successful Terry Bradshaw has been   (webmd.com) divider line 21
    More: Sad, Nationwide Children, mood disorders, head injuries, neuropsychology  
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423 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Oct 2013 at 7:49 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-10-28 05:41:39 AM  
www.humanevents.com
 
2013-10-28 06:27:06 AM  
Drinking from a tin can can give you cancer

Everything that you do will eventually result in something

What are we supposed to do? Lock ourselves up in rooms and never see the light of day? Well, I already do that, but I aint no longer a kid.

And where the hell was I?
 
2013-10-28 07:00:23 AM  

cman: What are we supposed to do? Lock ourselves up in rooms and never see the light of day? Well, I already do that, but I aint no longer a kid.


Well, the problem with that is that it's been shown that kids with head injuries have major problems later in life, even from a single low-grade concussion. Some studies have shown a greater than 10 point IQ loss in the post-concussive phase, and every study has demonstrated some form of short term memory and cognitive impairment. We already know that repeated concussions can cause pseudo-parkinsons symptoms, increases the risk of subarachnoid and subdural bleeds, and results in substantial cognitive impairment.

And we know that most of those injuries are preventable as well with proper safety equipment and small changes in rules of certain sports. 

The case that Dr. Eubanks, our Trauma Surgeon likes to use as an anecdotal example is of an MIT Student who went from being a straight A Student before a Grade II Concussion to flunking out of an engineering program because of the cognitive impairment identified later, when he sought a neurology exam to figure out why he couldn't remember things.

So the issue is do you prevent those injuries in an age group where the brain is very, very vulnerable, or do you just let them do that because it's what they've always done?
 
2013-10-28 07:08:08 AM  
For anyone interested in a read about how bad and insidious concussions can really be, even "simple" ones, here's a medscape article that goes over some generalities. (C&P link)

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/292326-overview
 
2013-10-28 07:09:31 AM  

hardinparamedic: cman: What are we supposed to do? Lock ourselves up in rooms and never see the light of day? Well, I already do that, but I aint no longer a kid.

Well, the problem with that is that it's been shown that kids with head injuries have major problems later in life, even from a single low-grade concussion. Some studies have shown a greater than 10 point IQ loss in the post-concussive phase, and every study has demonstrated some form of short term memory and cognitive impairment. We already know that repeated concussions can cause pseudo-parkinsons symptoms, increases the risk of subarachnoid and subdural bleeds, and results in substantial cognitive impairment.

And we know that most of those injuries are preventable as well with proper safety equipment and small changes in rules of certain sports.
The case that Dr. Eubanks, our Trauma Surgeon likes to use as an anecdotal example is of an MIT Student who went from being a straight A Student before a Grade II Concussion to flunking out of an engineering program because of the cognitive impairment identified later, when he sought a neurology exam to figure out why he couldn't remember things.

So the issue is do you prevent those injuries in an age group where the brain is very, very vulnerable, or do you just let them do that because it's what they've always done?


We are constantly told of the problems of obesity. So, which is more harmful, 10 points lower IQ or diabetes?

Children have got to be children
 
2013-10-28 07:12:53 AM  

cman: We are constantly told of the problems of obesity. So, which is more harmful, 10 points lower IQ or diabetes?


Your assumption is that it is ONE or the OTHER. The fact of the matter is you can have your cake and eat it too in this case.

cman: Children have got to be children


No one has suggested they don't have to be. What they have pointed out is that it is socially irresponsible to continue to have totally preventable head injuries to children when small changes in safety equipment and sports rules in younger children can be made.

If you want to get your brains boxed out, or go helmet to helmet in sports as an adult, you're more than welcome to. The fine medicare system in the United States will be there for you, as you made a conscious decision to do so. The same shouldn't apply to a six year old kid.
 
2013-10-28 07:43:23 AM  
And it's not just important for preventative measures, but for corrective.  If a child suffers head trauma, it's kind of good to know how to treat the condition to mitigate future problems.
 
2013-10-28 07:54:04 AM  
He always seemed pretty happy to me.

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-10-28 08:00:24 AM  

cman: hardinparamedic: cman: What are we supposed to do? Lock ourselves up in rooms and never see the light of day? Well, I already do that, but I aint no longer a kid.

Well, the problem with that is that it's been shown that kids with head injuries have major problems later in life, even from a single low-grade concussion. Some studies have shown a greater than 10 point IQ loss in the post-concussive phase, and every study has demonstrated some form of short term memory and cognitive impairment. We already know that repeated concussions can cause pseudo-parkinsons symptoms, increases the risk of subarachnoid and subdural bleeds, and results in substantial cognitive impairment.

And we know that most of those injuries are preventable as well with proper safety equipment and small changes in rules of certain sports.
The case that Dr. Eubanks, our Trauma Surgeon likes to use as an anecdotal example is of an MIT Student who went from being a straight A Student before a Grade II Concussion to flunking out of an engineering program because of the cognitive impairment identified later, when he sought a neurology exam to figure out why he couldn't remember things.

So the issue is do you prevent those injuries in an age group where the brain is very, very vulnerable, or do you just let them do that because it's what they've always done?

We are constantly told of the problems of obesity. So, which is more harmful, 10 points lower IQ or diabetes?

Children have got to be children


Strawman. The choice is not between "catastrophic brain injury" and "wrapped in cotton wool, never leaving their bedroom, never learning to function in the adult world".

The better comparison is to road safety. As cars became prevalent, too many kids were being hurt in road accidents. So we made a few key changes -- teaching kids the proper drill for crossing, slowing traffic in residential areas, redesigning car bumpers -- and the result was a huge decrease in deaths and injuries. But we didn't have to tell children "never cross the road, it's too dangerous."

BTW, when your position depends on repeatedly misrepresenting the opposing argument, it's usually a red flag that your position is untenable. Just FYI.
 
2013-10-28 08:02:00 AM  

czetie: cman: hardinparamedic: cman: What are we supposed to do? Lock ourselves up in rooms and never see the light of day? Well, I already do that, but I aint no longer a kid.

Well, the problem with that is that it's been shown that kids with head injuries have major problems later in life, even from a single low-grade concussion. Some studies have shown a greater than 10 point IQ loss in the post-concussive phase, and every study has demonstrated some form of short term memory and cognitive impairment. We already know that repeated concussions can cause pseudo-parkinsons symptoms, increases the risk of subarachnoid and subdural bleeds, and results in substantial cognitive impairment.

And we know that most of those injuries are preventable as well with proper safety equipment and small changes in rules of certain sports.
The case that Dr. Eubanks, our Trauma Surgeon likes to use as an anecdotal example is of an MIT Student who went from being a straight A Student before a Grade II Concussion to flunking out of an engineering program because of the cognitive impairment identified later, when he sought a neurology exam to figure out why he couldn't remember things.

So the issue is do you prevent those injuries in an age group where the brain is very, very vulnerable, or do you just let them do that because it's what they've always done?

We are constantly told of the problems of obesity. So, which is more harmful, 10 points lower IQ or diabetes?

Children have got to be children

Strawman. The choice is not between "catastrophic brain injury" and "wrapped in cotton wool, never leaving their bedroom, never learning to function in the adult world".

The better comparison is to road safety. As cars became prevalent, too many kids were being hurt in road accidents. So we made a few key changes -- teaching kids the proper drill for crossing, slowing traffic in residential areas, redesigning car bumpers -- and the result was a huge decrease in deaths and injuries. But we didn't ...


Attempting to avoid debate by shouting "strawman" is so 2012.
 
2013-10-28 08:07:06 AM  
I don't know what subby was trying to do but Terry Bradshaw has had severe depression/anxiety issues.
 
2013-10-28 08:13:23 AM  

PreMortem: I don't know what subby was trying to do but Terry Bradshaw has had severe depression/anxiety issues.


Let's make fun of Mike Webster in the bargain.
 
2013-10-28 08:34:20 AM  

cman: Attempting to avoid debate by shouting "strawman" is so 2012.


Complaining that somebody called out your strawman is so high school debate club.

And I also note that you failed to engage with the substantive points specifically identifying your strawman as a strawman. Complaining that your strawman got called out doesn't make it any less of a strawman.

I didn't avoid debate, I explicitly invited debate on the actual point of contention -- something you tried to distract from by pretending (again) that I did otherwise. Actually, do you have a single point here that doesn't involve misrepresenting what you are arguing against?

Now, are you ready yet to engage with the actual argument being made here, that head injuries cause big repercussions later in life and that small changes can lead to substantial reductions in such injuries? Or are you going to continue alternating between pretending that the alternative to head injuries is wrapping kids in cotton wool and whining about being called out for that pretense?
 
2013-10-28 08:36:05 AM  

PreMortem: I don't know what subby was trying to do but Terry Bradshaw has had severe depression/anxiety issues.


IIRC he already had them by the time his NFL career started. He has also been an advocate for awareness and treatment, helping men in particular, who are often reluctant to seek treatment, to understand that depression and anxiety are signs of illness, not weakness.
 
2013-10-28 09:26:17 AM  

cman: Attempting to avoid debate by shouting "strawman" is so 2012.


He does have a point though. It's a false dilemma. It's not an option between go out and get dismembered, or wear a Bear Attack Suit everywhere you go.
 
2013-10-28 11:45:46 AM  

hardinparamedic: good info about recent understanding of head injuries


cman:

Children have got to be children

they can still be children and wear a helmet.

/it's ok to embrace good technology
 
2013-10-28 04:29:29 PM  
I watched a kid take a lacrosse ball to the head just above the goggles this weekend, so I am getting a kick out of this thread.

You could hear the thunk clear across the field.
 
2013-10-28 06:32:49 PM  
I believe subby is referring the infamous incident perpetrated by Cleveland's Turkey Jones, literally grabbing Bradshaw like a wrestler and body slamming him onto his head.

rayonsports.com
 
2013-10-28 06:54:58 PM  

namegoeshere: I watched a kid take a lacrosse ball to the head just above the goggles this weekend, so I am getting a kick out of this thread.

You could hear the thunk clear across the field.


Wasn't he wearing a helmet?
 
2013-10-28 07:14:02 PM  

Debeo Summa Credo: namegoeshere: I watched a kid take a lacrosse ball to the head just above the goggles this weekend, so I am getting a kick out of this thread.

You could hear the thunk clear across the field.

Wasn't he wearing a helmet?


She, so no. Hence the goggles.
 
2013-10-29 07:32:57 PM  
It's called post-concussion syndrome, it is very real, and it is not just kids. The scary thing is that it can take years to fully manifest. I know it screwed me up royally, and it's a slow recovery.
 
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