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(Huffington Post)   Nine reasons beer is even better than you thought, because beer   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 65
    More: Cool, therapeutic benefits, blood circulation, Belgian beers, cognitive impairment, Castor and Pollux  
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6879 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Oct 2013 at 5:07 PM (44 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



65 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-10-27 05:11:03 PM
Reason 10: It makes Taco Bell sound delicious.
 
2013-10-27 05:12:45 PM
Reason 11: Parrots cannot open a bottle of wine
 
2013-10-27 05:14:08 PM
Beer is great. It contains vitamin P.
 
2013-10-27 05:17:39 PM
Reason 12: It makes HuffPo articles seem like actual journalism
 
2013-10-27 05:20:05 PM

Chafed Willi: Reason 12: It makes HuffPo articles seem like actual journalism


Man, if you get to that point, put the bottle down.
 
2013-10-27 05:27:26 PM
 
2013-10-27 05:33:23 PM
It's cereal in a can.
 
2013-10-27 05:41:19 PM
well, i like beer, and i cannot lie, any other beverage, is just too dry.
 
2013-10-27 05:42:43 PM

Phil Clinton: Reason 10: It makes Taco Bell sound delicious.


That's weed, dude.


Anybody have any suggestions for a good beer to impress a wine snob? It's my turn to host Thanksgiving, for a change, and my BIL fancies himself quite the foodie and wine connoisseur. I can source most beers from a local ABC store, if I give them enough lead time.  I have a feeling that my usual Magic Hat #9, Dogfish Head IPAs, or even the "girlie" Leinenkugels I can get from the grocery store aren't going to cut it for him and my sister...
 
2013-10-27 05:49:32 PM

Hz so good: Phil Clinton: Reason 10: It makes Taco Bell sound delicious.

That's weed, dude.


Anybody have any suggestions for a good beer to impress a wine snob? It's my turn to host Thanksgiving, for a change, and my BIL fancies himself quite the foodie and wine connoisseur. I can source most beers from a local ABC store, if I give them enough lead time.  I have a feeling that my usual Magic Hat #9, Dogfish Head IPAs, or even the "girlie" Leinenkugels I can get from the grocery store aren't going to cut it for him and my sister...


Hard to say without knowing his tastes.  What type of wine does he like?  Does he like:  Hops?  Chocolate?  Coffee?  Scotch?  Malt?  Sweet?  Funky?  Sour?
 
2013-10-27 05:50:37 PM

RogermcAllen: Hz so good: Phil Clinton: Reason 10: It makes Taco Bell sound delicious.

That's weed, dude.


Anybody have any suggestions for a good beer to impress a wine snob? It's my turn to host Thanksgiving, for a change, and my BIL fancies himself quite the foodie and wine connoisseur. I can source most beers from a local ABC store, if I give them enough lead time.  I have a feeling that my usual Magic Hat #9, Dogfish Head IPAs, or even the "girlie" Leinenkugels I can get from the grocery store aren't going to cut it for him and my sister...

Hard to say without knowing his tastes.  What type of wine does he like?  Does he like:  Hops?  Chocolate?  Coffee?  Scotch?  Malt?  Sweet?  Funky?  Sour?


He doesn't really drink beer, just Italian and French red wines.
 
2013-10-27 05:54:22 PM
I forgot to add that I'm terrible with remembering the names of wine. I don't really drink it, I just tend to find what tastes good to cook with. Last year, he made a big deal about us having bottles of wine from the vineyards of the founder of either Ferrari or Lamborghini.
 
2013-10-27 06:02:55 PM
My initial suggestions would be:
1.  Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Ale -  Good and complex, a bit of bourbon and you can taste the oak
2.  Left Hand Milk Stout (nitro if you can) - This beer is like chocolate milk
3.  Boulevard Tank 7 Farmhouse ale - This beer is a good kind of funky Saison without being too crazy
4.  North Coast Old Rasputin - This beer is very dark, kind of like drinking coffee grounds

I'll keep thinking.
 
2013-10-27 06:03:20 PM

Hz so good: Phil Clinton: Reason 10: It makes Taco Bell sound delicious.

That's weed, dude.


I dunno, Taco Bell is pretty amazing drunk food.

As for you BIL, while I'm afraid I can't recommend any particular brand, I would suggest looking for a good melomel (mead made by fermenting honey and fruit).
 
2013-10-27 06:04:02 PM

Hz so good: RogermcAllen: Hz so good: Phil Clinton: Reason 10: It makes Taco Bell sound delicious.

That's weed, dude.


Anybody have any suggestions for a good beer to impress a wine snob? It's my turn to host Thanksgiving, for a change, and my BIL fancies himself quite the foodie and wine connoisseur. I can source most beers from a local ABC store, if I give them enough lead time.  I have a feeling that my usual Magic Hat #9, Dogfish Head IPAs, or even the "girlie" Leinenkugels I can get from the grocery store aren't going to cut it for him and my sister...

Hard to say without knowing his tastes.  What type of wine does he like?  Does he like:  Hops?  Chocolate?  Coffee?  Scotch?  Malt?  Sweet?  Funky?  Sour?

He doesn't really drink beer, just Italian and French red wines.


If you can't out-pretentious him, go weird.  http://www.ratebeer.com/beer/heather-ales-kelpie/8500/

It's actually pretty drinkable, plus odd ingredients let you tell him you're expanding his palate.

Or one of the dogfish head brews like Midas Touch that are made with Grapes as well as barley.
 
2013-10-27 06:05:29 PM

Hz so good: I forgot to add that I'm terrible with remembering the names of wine. I don't really drink it, I just tend to find what tastes good to cook with. Last year, he made a big deal about us having bottles of wine from the vineyards of the founder of either Ferrari or Lamborghini.


Which is great, if you think auto executives are automatically wine experts.

I take the view that there is no such thing as "bad wine".  If you like it, it's good.  Who cares if some guy on the Internet likes it?
 
2013-10-27 06:08:49 PM

RogermcAllen: My initial suggestions would be:
1.  Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Ale -  Good and complex, a bit of bourbon and you can taste the oak
2.  Left Hand Milk Stout (nitro if you can) - This beer is like chocolate milk
3.  Boulevard Tank 7 Farmhouse ale - This beer is a good kind of funky Saison without being too crazy
4.  North Coast Old Rasputin - This beer is very dark, kind of like drinking coffee grounds

I'll keep thinking.


Those sound tasty as hell! Awesome! Thanks!
 
2013-10-27 06:09:57 PM

Lachwen: Hz so good: Phil Clinton: Reason 10: It makes Taco Bell sound delicious.

That's weed, dude.

I dunno, Taco Bell is pretty amazing drunk food.

As for you BIL, while I'm afraid I can't recommend any particular brand, I would suggest looking for a good melomel (mead made by fermenting honey and fruit).


Hadn't thought about mead... I'll have to poke around and try one. Thanks!
 
2013-10-27 06:11:27 PM
...hmm.  You may want to disregard my suggestion, as it appears there really aren't any melomels made commercially; all I can find are recipes for homebrewers.  So unless you know a homebrewer who can knock a batch together for you, melomel is probably out of the question.
 
2013-10-27 06:11:30 PM

rustyspork: *snip*

If you can't out-pretentious him, go weird.  http://www.ratebeer.com/beer/heather-ales-kelpie/8500/

It's actually pretty drinkable, plus odd ingredients let you tell him you're expanding his palate.

Or one of the dogfish head brews like Midas Touch that are made with Grapes as well as barley.


Awesome! I'll have to see if I can get one of the kelpies. I've tried Midas Touch, but it was more like a dessert wine. Well, to me, anyways...
 
2013-10-27 06:13:56 PM

Hz so good: RogermcAllen: Hz so good: Phil Clinton: Reason 10: It makes Taco Bell sound delicious.

That's weed, dude.


Anybody have any suggestions for a good beer to impress a wine snob? It's my turn to host Thanksgiving, for a change, and my BIL fancies himself quite the foodie and wine connoisseur. I can source most beers from a local ABC store, if I give them enough lead time.  I have a feeling that my usual Magic Hat #9, Dogfish Head IPAs, or even the "girlie" Leinenkugels I can get from the grocery store aren't going to cut it for him and my sister...

Hard to say without knowing his tastes.  What type of wine does he like?  Does he like:  Hops?  Chocolate?  Coffee?  Scotch?  Malt?  Sweet?  Funky?  Sour?

He doesn't really drink beer, just Italian and French red wines.


Dogfish Head has a beer they brew with wine called Red and White, he might like that as a bridge.  Two of my favorites from their lineup are Positive Contact, which is brewed with apples and herbs and has a pleasing cider taste, it would fit really well with a Thanksgiving dinner.  If they can bring it in for you, also try to get some Immort Ale.  It's hands down my favorite beer that DFH makes - it's full flavored, very complex, and packs a punch, a wine drinker might find it appealing for the depth.
 
2013-10-27 06:14:25 PM

Lachwen: ...hmm.  You may want to disregard my suggestion, as it appears there really aren't any melomels made commercially; all I can find are recipes for homebrewers.  So unless you know a homebrewer who can knock a batch together for you, melomel is probably out of the question.


Sadly, no, I don't know any homebrewers. I've been toying with the idea myself, but it's always been one of those back burner things I never seem to find the time for.
 
2013-10-27 06:16:40 PM
Though I can very much recommend  Dansk Mjød Viking Blod, a "Nordic honey wine" (meaning mead) infused with hops and hibiscus.  It's utterly delicious.  It's also 19% a.b.v.
 
2013-10-27 06:18:13 PM

Hz so good: Lachwen: ...hmm.  You may want to disregard my suggestion, as it appears there really aren't any melomels made commercially; all I can find are recipes for homebrewers.  So unless you know a homebrewer who can knock a batch together for you, melomel is probably out of the question.

Sadly, no, I don't know any homebrewers. I've been toying with the idea myself, but it's always been one of those back burner things I never seem to find the time for.


You could also see if you can find this stuff:

2.bp.blogspot.com

It's by Lindeman's and called Cuvee Rene.  It's brewed with wild yeast, which yields a tart funky flavor that's different from a lot of other beers.
 
2013-10-27 06:19:09 PM

TuteTibiImperes: *snip*
Dogfish Head has a beer they brew with wine called Red and White, he might like that as a bridge.  Two of my favorites from their lineup are Positive Contact, which is brewed with apples and herbs and has a pleasing cider taste, it would fit really well with a Thanksgiving dinner.  If they can bring it in for you, also try to get some Immort Ale.  It's hands down my favorite beer that DFH makes - it's full flavored, very complex, and packs a punch, a wine drinker might find it appealing for the depth.


Huh... Haven't tried Positive Contact, Red and White, or Immort Ale (first I've heard of them, to be truthful). Thanks for the heads up!

I kinda wish I was within driving distance of DFHs brew pub, so I could try all the new beers they test out.
 
2013-10-27 06:21:51 PM

Lachwen: Though I can very much recommend  Dansk Mjød Viking Blod, a "Nordic honey wine" (meaning mead) infused with hops and hibiscus.  It's utterly delicious.  It's also 19% a.b.v.


That. Sounds. AWESOME!  :D

I love the comments on that page, too:

"Smell of heavy ginger. Flavor is vegetal, farts, ginger. It''ll get you farked up while you gag."
 
2013-10-27 06:24:03 PM

TuteTibiImperes: *snip*

[2.bp.blogspot.com image 850x1133]

It's by Lindeman's and called Cuvee Rene.  It's brewed with wild yeast, which yields a tart funky flavor that's different from a lot of other beers.


Wow. Now that does look nice! I've always wanted to try a Lambic, but was never sure of what to go for. Thanks!
 
2013-10-27 06:28:56 PM

Hz so good: TuteTibiImperes: *snip*

[2.bp.blogspot.com image 850x1133]

It's by Lindeman's and called Cuvee Rene.  It's brewed with wild yeast, which yields a tart funky flavor that's different from a lot of other beers.

Wow. Now that does look nice! I've always wanted to try a Lambic, but was never sure of what to go for. Thanks!


Lindeman's is one of the easiest to get in the US, they seem to have pretty broad distribution.  They make a ton of fruit-infused beers, most of which lean very heavily towards the sweet side, and you might want to pick up a couple of bottles just to try, but the Cuvee Renee is more tart and complex than sweet, so it's easier to drink without feeling like you're drinking a dessert.
 
2013-10-27 06:32:32 PM

Hz so good: Lachwen: Though I can very much recommend  Dansk Mjød Viking Blod, a "Nordic honey wine" (meaning mead) infused with hops and hibiscus.  It's utterly delicious.  It's also 19% a.b.v.

That. Sounds. AWESOME!  :D

I love the comments on that page, too:

"Smell of heavy ginger. Flavor is vegetal, farts, ginger. It''ll get you farked up while you gag."


How anyone would gag while drinking Viking Blod is beyond me.  That stuff is truly the nectar of the gods.  I imagine it is what is served to the slain heroes as they party it up in Valhalla.
 
2013-10-27 06:39:31 PM

Hz so good: Anybody have any suggestions for a good beer to impress a wine snob? It's my turn to host Thanksgiving, for a change, and my BIL fancies himself quite the foodie and wine connoisseur. I can source most beers from a local ABC store, if I give them enough lead time.  I have a feeling that my usual Magic Hat #9, Dogfish Head IPAs, or even the "girlie" Leinenkugels I can get from the grocery store aren't going to cut it for him and my sister...


While this is a seasonal, Weyerbacher Insanity would be my preferred choice. Dogfishhead Immort-Ale is also solid. Further, while limited in release this was recent, a Class of '88 Barley Wine from Deschutes, North Coast, and Rogue is amazing. Otherwise, if none of those are available, get yourself some Weyerbacher Blithering Idiot since this is the basis of Insanity. Each of those is a barley wine (Immort-Ale is not considered but this is far passed the category of strong ale into the type of complexity I expect of barley wines) which are my favorite style of brews since well made there is unparalleled complexity and as temperature changes the flavors alter.

Hz so good: That. Sounds. AWESOME!  :D


I second Dansk Mjod Viking Blod. Without a doubt my favorite commercial mead. Unless you know someone nearby with a properly homebrewed sack mead, as I would have on hand, Viking Blod is the greatest beverage to share with folks. However, do not serve chilled, merely cold. Wait for condensation to stop developing on the bottle (and any glass thereafter poured into). The reason I say this is while the alcohol is notable in body only, the combination of high alcohol and chill will make the throat seize a little, and this gives the impression of low quality similar to taking a bottom shelf shot despite being an amazingly high quality drink (making a 19% mead in and of itself is a great feat but then the addition of a little used flavor such as hibiscus as well as proper dry hopping technique with a mead transcends great).

If unable to get anything suggested, Southern Tier Warlock is excellent, complex, and currently seasonal plus widely available.
 
2013-10-27 06:41:47 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Hz so good: TuteTibiImperes: *snip*

[2.bp.blogspot.com image 850x1133]

It's by Lindeman's and called Cuvee Rene.  It's brewed with wild yeast, which yields a tart funky flavor that's different from a lot of other beers.

Wow. Now that does look nice! I've always wanted to try a Lambic, but was never sure of what to go for. Thanks!

Lindeman's is one of the easiest to get in the US, they seem to have pretty broad distribution.  They make a ton of fruit-infused beers, most of which lean very heavily towards the sweet side, and you might want to pick up a couple of bottles just to try, but the Cuvee Renee is more tart and complex than sweet, so it's easier to drink without feeling like you're drinking a dessert.


Much appreciated! I think I might actually have a shot at impressing the family this year!  :D

Lachwen: How anyone would gag while drinking Viking Blod is beyond me.  That stuff is truly the nectar of the gods.  I imagine it is what is served to the slain heroes as they party it up in Valhalla

Don't sweat it. I think it sounds great, and can't wait to try one! I may be from the deep south,  but I grew up surrounded by Cantonese and Korean people, and some of the tastiest food was also the weirdest looking, or smelliest.
 
2013-10-27 06:49:58 PM
But his fancy-dancy wine labels can't do  THIS, can they
 
2013-10-27 06:50:34 PM

Vangor: *snip*

While this is a seasonal, Weyerbacher Insanity would be my preferred choice. Dogfishhead Immort-Ale is also solid. Further, while limited in release this was recent, a Class of '88 Barley Wine from Deschutes, North Coast, and Rogue is amazing. Otherwise, if none of those are available, get yourself some Weyerbacher Blithering Idiot since this is the basis of Insanity. Each of those is a barley wine (Immort-Ale is not considered but this is far passed the category of strong ale into the type of complexity I expect of barley wines) which are my favorite style of brews since well made there is unparalleled complexity and as temperature changes the flavors alter.


Hmm... Never heard of Weyerbacher. I'll have to check it out! Thank you very much! :)

*snip*. ...However, do not serve chilled, merely cold. Wait for condensation to stop developing on the bottle (and any glass thereafter poured into). The reason I say this is while the alcohol is notable in body only, the combination of high alcohol and chill will make the throat seize a little, and this gives the impression of low quality..

I'm glad you mentioned that! I have no experience with mead, so I probably would've chilled it,  and then cheated myself out of a great experience.
 
2013-10-27 06:53:17 PM

mjjt: But his fancy-dancy wine labels can't do  THIS, can they


Nice! I like that!
 
2013-10-27 06:54:09 PM

Lachwen: ...hmm.  You may want to disregard my suggestion, as it appears there really aren't any melomels made commercially; all I can find are recipes for homebrewers.  So unless you know a homebrewer who can knock a batch together for you, melomel is probably out of the question.


Few meaderies do much other than semi-sweets or faux-mulsums and pyments. Frankly, the only meadery in United States which has some decent availability is B Nektar, and even those folks often diverge too much from making a mead with other additions into some flavor profile which happens to have must. Which is why I brew 6 gallons every month, most of which is a sack mead.
 
2013-10-27 06:56:20 PM
$5 a bottle, but worth every penny for the rich, dark gold within.

fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net
 
2013-10-27 07:00:33 PM

Rev.K: $5 a bottle, but worth every penny for the rich, dark gold within.

[fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net image 424x640]


Huh... I've never tried a porter. I'll have to give it a shot. Much appreciated!
 
2013-10-27 07:07:50 PM

Vangor: Lachwen: ...hmm.  You may want to disregard my suggestion, as it appears there really aren't any melomels made commercially; all I can find are recipes for homebrewers.  So unless you know a homebrewer who can knock a batch together for you, melomel is probably out of the question.

Few meaderies do much other than semi-sweets or faux-mulsums and pyments. Frankly, the only meadery in United States which has some decent availability is B Nektar, and even those folks often diverge too much from making a mead with other additions into some flavor profile which happens to have must. Which is why I brew 6 gallons every month, most of which is a sack mead.


One of the things I miss most now that I've moved to a different state is not having ready access to my dad's homebrews.  He makes a wonderful blackberry melomel in the summer (of course he harvests his own blackberries), as well as a really good metheglin with mint - he calls it "a Viking mint julep."

Maybe that's what I should ask him for this Christmas: a case of his homebrew.
 
2013-10-27 07:18:25 PM
Hz so good:
Anybody have any suggestions for a good beer to impress a wine snob? It's my turn to host Thanksgiving, for a change, and my BIL fancies himself quite the foodie and wine connoisseur. I can source most beers from a local ABC store, if I give them enough lead time.  I have a feeling that my usual Magic Hat #9, Dogfish Head IPAs, or even the "girlie" Leinenkugels I can get from the grocery store aren't going to cut it for him and my sister...

I had one of these bad boys recently
beveragebaron.files.wordpress.com

It Is Victory's Baltic Thunder Porter aged in red wine barrels.  A similar flavor profile to a Flemmish Red (like Rodenbach or Duchess De Bourgogne - either of these would make excellent pairings as well) but with a deeper, darker malt character.  It pairs well with just about anything you would pair a French Bordeux or Italian Chianti with, it doesn't cleanse the palate quite as well as the wine (though the Duchess would) but all the flavors will match and complement!
 
2013-10-27 07:19:14 PM

Hz so good: Anybody have any suggestions for a good beer to impress a wine snob? It's my turn to host Thanksgiving, for a change, and my BIL fancies himself quite the foodie and wine connoisseur. I can source most beers from a local ABC store, if I give them enough lead time. I have a feeling that my usual Magic Hat #9, Dogfish Head IPAs, or even the "girlie" Leinenkugels I can get from the grocery store aren't going to cut it for him and my sister...


I'd go for pairing a good beer with what's on the menu.  Figure out your menu and then consult with a local beer guy or even somebody like the chef at your local brew pub.  They're usually more than helpful on things like that and, given the sense of community that exists amongst the craft brew crowd, chances are that he or she would even recommend beers from another brewer if they thought it would pair better with your menu.  But, of course, that only solves the problem of what to serve with dinner - and you might end up with different beers with different courses - definitely not a bad thing but may suggest less than bottle servings with each course.

To get you to the dinner, start experimenting with different tasty cocktails that could play up a seasonal theme and go with one or two fairly simple hors d'oeuvres.

As a former wine snob converted to the myriad wonders of craft beers (although I still occasionally enjoy a glass of wine) I can only say that it might work or it might not insofar as your BIL is concerned.  But if you develop some kind of relationship with a local chef or two (and you might be incredibly surprised at how willing they are to talk about food and help you with this kind of thing, especially if you're a customer), the absolute worst thing that will happen is that you can elevate your own culinary life and enjoyment of food and beer.  That alone could be worth the effort.
 
2013-10-27 07:29:58 PM

hubris73: *snip*
It Is Victory's Baltic Thunder Porter aged in red wine barrels.  A similar flavor profile to a Flemmish Red (like Rodenbach or Duchess De Bourgogne - either of these would make excellent pairings as well) but with a deeper, darker malt character.  It pairs well with just about anything you would pair a French Bordeux or Italian Chianti with, it doesn't cleanse the palate quite as well as the wine (though the Duchess would) but all the flavors will match and complement!


Dayum! That looks and sounds really, really, good!  Much appreciated!  :D
 
2013-10-27 07:32:10 PM
Mr. Right:*snip*
I'd go for pairing a good beer with what's on the menu.  Figure out your menu and then consult with a local beer guy or even somebody like the chef at your local brew pub.  They're usually more than helpful on things like that and, given the sense of community that exists amongst the craft brew crowd, chances are that he or she would even recommend beers from another brewer if they thought it would pair better with your menu.  But, of course, that only solves the problem of what to serve with dinner - and you might end up with different beers with different courses - definitely not a bad thing but may suggest less than bottle servings with each course.

To get you to the dinner, start experimenting with different tasty cocktails that could play up a seasonal theme and go with one or two fairly simple hors d'oeuvres.

As a former wine snob converted to the myriad wonders of craft beers (although I still occasionally enjoy a glass of wine) I can only say that it might work or it might not insofar as your BIL is concerned.  But if you develop some kind of relationship with a local chef or two (and you might be incredibly surprised at how willing they are to talk about food and help you with this kind of thing, especially if you're a customer), the absolute worst thing that will happen is that you can elevate your own culinary life and enjoyment of food and beer.  That alone could be worth the effort.


That's good advice! Thanks!
 
2013-10-27 08:06:36 PM
Another reason Austin is awesome:

Beer Week.
 
2013-10-27 08:18:06 PM

Hz so good: Phil Clinton: Reason 10: It makes Taco Bell sound delicious.

That's weed, dude.


Anybody have any suggestions for a good beer to impress a wine snob? It's my turn to host Thanksgiving, for a change, and my BIL fancies himself quite the foodie and wine connoisseur. I can source most beers from a local ABC store, if I give them enough lead time.  I have a feeling that my usual Magic Hat #9, Dogfish Head IPAs, or even the "girlie" Leinenkugels I can get from the grocery store aren't going to cut it for him and my sister...


My favorite is Weyerbacker's Blithering Idiot.
 
2013-10-27 08:40:12 PM

SassyFrenchHorn: *snip*

My favorite is Weyerbacker's Blithering Idiot.


I've got to admit, I'm sold on the name alone. :D


/I've got 16 new beers to try. YAY!!
 
2013-10-27 09:17:17 PM

Lachwen: You may want to disregard my suggestion, as it appears there really aren't any melomels made commercially


Damn. That's too bad. I wanted to have some melomel with Mallomars and Malto Meal. It would make me muy mellow.
 
2013-10-27 10:05:24 PM

Hz so good: Mr. Right:*snip*
I'd go for pairing a good beer with what's on the menu.  Figure out your menu and then consult with a local beer guy or even somebody like the chef at your local brew pub.  They're usually more than helpful on things like that and, given the sense of community that exists amongst the craft brew crowd, chances are that he or she would even recommend beers from another brewer if they thought it would pair better with your menu.  But, of course, that only solves the problem of what to serve with dinner - and you might end up with different beers with different courses - definitely not a bad thing but may suggest less than bottle servings with each course.

To get you to the dinner, start experimenting with different tasty cocktails that could play up a seasonal theme and go with one or two fairly simple hors d'oeuvres.

As a former wine snob converted to the myriad wonders of craft beers (although I still occasionally enjoy a glass of wine) I can only say that it might work or it might not insofar as your BIL is concerned.  But if you develop some kind of relationship with a local chef or two (and you might be incredibly surprised at how willing they are to talk about food and help you with this kind of thing, especially if you're a customer), the absolute worst thing that will happen is that you can elevate your own culinary life and enjoyment of food and beer.  That alone could be worth the effort.

That's good advice! Thanks!


Where are you from btw?  There are enough of us from around all over that we might be able to recommend some local stuff that isn't widely distributed.
 
2013-10-27 10:55:52 PM

Hz so good: Phil Clinton: Reason 10: It makes Taco Bell sound delicious.

That's weed, dude.


Anybody have any suggestions for a good beer to impress a wine snob? It's my turn to host Thanksgiving, for a change, and my BIL fancies himself quite the foodie and wine connoisseur. I can source most beers from a local ABC store, if I give them enough lead time.  I have a feeling that my usual Magic Hat #9, Dogfish Head IPAs, or even the "girlie" Leinenkugels I can get from the grocery store aren't going to cut it for him and my sister...


If you can find it, and you can only find it in Wisconsin, I'd give New Glarus' Serendipity a shot.  Brewed with apples, cranberries, and cherries, and quite good and it's even bottled in wine bottles.
 
2013-10-27 11:39:14 PM
...people confusing hopp-soup with beer again...
 
2013-10-27 11:43:47 PM

Hz so good: Lachwen: ...hmm.  You may want to disregard my suggestion, as it appears there really aren't any melomels made commercially; all I can find are recipes for homebrewers.  So unless you know a homebrewer who can knock a batch together for you, melomel is probably out of the question.

Sadly, no, I don't know any homebrewers. I've been toying with the idea myself, but it's always been one of those back burner things I never seem to find the time for.


Amusingly, Southern Tier Brewery has a few limited brews they term 'back burner' series.

If you get into home brewing, you're probably going to want to save up about $150 if you want the good equipment; the glass carboys and the tools can get pricey if you go high quality. You're not going to save money for at least the first few batches, but it's kind of fun as a hobby. Once we move to our new house, I'm going to try growing my own hops plants because there's a HUGE garden I need to put stuff in :D
 
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