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(UPI)   San Jose, California bans student car washes because they: A) create traffic. B) generate noise, or C) endanger the environment   (upi.com) divider line 50
    More: Unlikely, San Jose, storm water, car washes  
•       •       •

923 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Oct 2013 at 10:43 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



50 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-10-27 10:51:02 AM  
Walter Peck is pleased.
 
2013-10-27 10:56:59 AM  
Some things are more important than a little environmental contamination.

kweeklies.media.clients.ellingtoncms.com
 
2013-10-27 11:07:37 AM  
"Cars can be washed with a solution that requires no water, but the concentrate costs $159 a gallon."

Er, whatcha gonna dilute it with?
 
2013-10-27 11:12:02 AM  
"A liberal and his common sense are soon parted"
 
2013-10-27 11:12:32 AM  
Sounds like the Car Wash Council struck again.
 
2013-10-27 11:17:02 AM  
I understand that San Jose has water issues, and that keeping phosphates, road debris, brake dust, etc. out of the storm drains probably makes economic and water quality sense.

But instead of banning the activity:

1) Require people to use biodegradable cleaning agents that don't contain those problematic ingredients.  Suggest rainwater for filling buckets-- rain barrels are very cheap and are helpful with gardening too.

2) Wash the cars on gravel or other porous surfaces so the excess goes into the ground, not into a drain that routes it directly to a river.

3) When the car wash is done, dump out the buckets and rinse the rags/sponges into sinks or toilets (so it gets treated), not storm drains (which go straight into rivers/etc.).

4) Or just partner up with a commercial car wash.  They use much less water, filter and re-use the water a few times, route all of their runoff into treated lines, and capture solid waste (dust, etc.) for disposal in the trash.

I have a porous driveway and a couple hundred gallons of rain storage.  My car is shiny, and nothing ends up in the storm drains.  It's not rocket science.
 
2013-10-27 11:34:26 AM  
We would not want that soapy water polluting our poops!

Funny how "sewers" have all been renamed "storm drains".
People now think we have all these new underground plumbing that takes what goes down the toilet to a magic happy place and never seen or smelled again and the water that goes down the shower drain or through a sewer grate goes somewhere else and ends up in the cups that fish drink their water from.
 
2013-10-27 11:36:29 AM  

chimp_ninja: I understand that San Jose has water issues, and that keeping phosphates, road debris, brake dust, etc. out of the storm drains probably makes economic and water quality sense.

But instead of banning the activity:

1) Require people to use biodegradable cleaning agents that don't contain those problematic ingredients.  Suggest rainwater for filling buckets-- rain barrels are very cheap and are helpful with gardening too.

2) Wash the cars on gravel or other porous surfaces so the excess goes into the ground, not into a drain that routes it directly to a river.

3) When the car wash is done, dump out the buckets and rinse the rags/sponges into sinks or toilets (so it gets treated), not storm drains (which go straight into rivers/etc.).

4) Or just partner up with a commercial car wash.  They use much less water, filter and re-use the water a few times, route all of their runoff into treated lines, and capture solid waste (dust, etc.) for disposal in the trash.

I have a porous driveway and a couple hundred gallons of rain storage.  My car is shiny, and nothing ends up in the storm drains.  It's not rocket science.


You are being satirical here right?
 
2013-10-27 11:43:29 AM  

Quackadam: Funny how "sewers" have all been renamed "storm drains".


You don't know how storm drains differ from sewers?
Storm drains carry rain water and runoff to, in this case, the San Francisco Bay, since all the old creeks and streams have been paved or built over.
Sewers carry sewage and gray water to sewage treatment facilities.
They are two completely separate systems, which is why dumping chemicals into storm drains is forbidden.
 
2013-10-27 11:44:25 AM  

Quackadam: We would not want that soapy water polluting our poops!

Funny how "sewers" have all been renamed "storm drains".
People now think we have all these new underground plumbing that takes what goes down the toilet to a magic happy place and never seen or smelled again and the water that goes down the shower drain or through a sewer grate goes somewhere else and ends up in the cups that fish drink their water from.


In places that aren't old shiatholes, sewers and storm drains are separate systems. Many municipalities like Chicago have, in recent years, under taken massive infrastructure projects to separate them.

2media.nowpublic.net
 
2013-10-27 11:48:38 AM  

chimp_ninja: 1) Require people to use biodegradable cleaning agents that don't contain those problematic ingredients.   Suggest rainwater for filling buckets-- rain barrels are very cheap and are helpful with gardening too.


San Jose is in an semi-arid climate.  There's not enough rain for that to work.
 
2013-10-27 12:02:46 PM  

Zeno-25: Quackadam: We would not want that soapy water polluting our poops!

Funny how "sewers" have all been renamed "storm drains".
People now think we have all these new underground plumbing that takes what goes down the toilet to a magic happy place and never seen or smelled again and the water that goes down the shower drain or through a sewer grate goes somewhere else and ends up in the cups that fish drink their water from.

In places that aren't old shiatholes, sewers and storm drains are separate systems. Many municipalities like Chicago have, in recent years, under taken massive infrastructure projects to separate them.

[2media.nowpublic.net image 500x330]


Oh really, well then a lot of the United States is a shiathole! Unless a great many modern cities pulled up all the streets under the cover of night, and laid in whole new pipelines and secretly went under peoples houses and reworked all their plumbing, it all goes to the same place as it did when it was laid down.  
Go to your local municipality and ask for copies of the city sewer systems.
 
2013-10-27 12:05:50 PM  
FTA:  Loft said school groups could still hold car washes if they were conducted under certain conditions. Those include washing vehicles over grassy or gravel areas, ensuring wash water doesn't go into the street, gutter or storm drain and leaving no soap stains on the ground.

Doesn't seem that unreasonable, actually.
 
2013-10-27 12:13:19 PM  

Quackadam: We would not want that soapy water polluting our poops!

Funny how "sewers" have all been renamed "storm drains".
People now think we have all these new underground plumbing that takes what goes down the toilet to a magic happy place and never seen or smelled again and the water that goes down the shower drain or through a sewer grate goes somewhere else and ends up in the cups that fish drink their water from.



Um in California they almost ALL go straight into the ocean. You are the one who who has no idea what you are talking about.
 
2013-10-27 12:14:54 PM  
 
2013-10-27 12:19:21 PM  

Quackadam: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QT7FYQBbcRE



Umm things in Northeast Ohio might work different than a state like California that's all next to the ocean.
 
2013-10-27 12:21:01 PM  

chimp_ninja: I understand that San Jose has water issues, and that keeping phosphates, road debris, brake dust, etc. out of the storm drains probably makes economic and water quality sense.

But instead of banning the activity:

1) Require people to use biodegradable cleaning agents that don't contain those problematic ingredients.  Suggest rainwater for filling buckets-- rain barrels are very cheap and are helpful with gardening too.

2) Wash the cars on gravel or other porous surfaces so the excess goes into the ground, not into a drain that routes it directly to a river.

3) When the car wash is done, dump out the buckets and rinse the rags/sponges into sinks or toilets (so it gets treated), not storm drains (which go straight into rivers/etc.).

4) Or just partner up with a commercial car wash.  They use much less water, filter and re-use the water a few times, route all of their runoff into treated lines, and capture solid waste (dust, etc.) for disposal in the trash.

I have a porous driveway and a couple hundred gallons of rain storage.  My car is shiny, and nothing ends up in the storm drains.  It's not rocket science.


Monthly rainfall totals for San Jose, CA:

YEAR JAN,FEB,MAR,APR,MAY,JUN,JUL,AUG,SEP,OCT,NOV,DEC,ANN

2013 0.68,0.12a,0.86a,0.07z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00 z,1.66
 
2013-10-27 12:43:29 PM  
As I stated above
'it all goes to the same place as it did when it was laid down'.
If you don't know what type of system you have in your area certain ideas on where to put what water may make no differents!  Many areas don't know what they have or where it goes and treat everything the same way, often wrong.
Sorry if the fact the video was made for Ohio customers and San Jose is in California, I thought the concept would carry over. Just watch it again with the sound turned off.
 
2013-10-27 12:45:09 PM  
This is one of those threads on FARK where people completely unfamiliar with a situation  tell the people that know a lot and have studied the situation that they are stupid because they have though about it for 10 secs and it doesn't jive with their simplistic view of the situation?


Oh wait that's about every FARK thread.

/Loved when Southern California had wild fires and people where posting in a thread it was because southern California doesn't allow logging of it's "forests".
 
2013-10-27 12:49:12 PM  

Quackadam: As I stated above
'it all goes to the same place as it did when it was laid down'.
If you don't know what type of system you have in your area certain ideas on where to put what water may make no differents!  Many areas don't know what they have or where it goes and treat everything the same way, often wrong.
Sorry if the fact the video was made for Ohio customers and San Jose is in California, I thought the concept would carry over. Just watch it again with the sound turned off.


Dude you are wrong. Stop trying to pretend you know what you are talking about.

California storm drains all most all empty out into rivers or oceans.

farm6.static.flickr.com

aquafornia.com
www.marinebio.net We do know what we are talking about. Your be clueless thinking because some  states that almost has no coast line doesn't do it that way that California does it the same way.
 
2013-10-27 12:50:16 PM  

dsmith42: chimp_ninja: I understand that San Jose has water issues, and that keeping phosphates, road debris, brake dust, etc. out of the storm drains probably makes economic and water quality sense.

But instead of banning the activity:

1) Require people to use biodegradable cleaning agents that don't contain those problematic ingredients.  Suggest rainwater for filling buckets-- rain barrels are very cheap and are helpful with gardening too.

2) Wash the cars on gravel or other porous surfaces so the excess goes into the ground, not into a drain that routes it directly to a river.

3) When the car wash is done, dump out the buckets and rinse the rags/sponges into sinks or toilets (so it gets treated), not storm drains (which go straight into rivers/etc.).

4) Or just partner up with a commercial car wash.  They use much less water, filter and re-use the water a few times, route all of their runoff into treated lines, and capture solid waste (dust, etc.) for disposal in the trash.

I have a porous driveway and a couple hundred gallons of rain storage.  My car is shiny, and nothing ends up in the storm drains.  It's not rocket science.

Monthly rainfall totals for San Jose, CA:

YEAR JAN,FEB,MAR,APR,MAY,JUN,JUL,AUG,SEP,OCT,NOV,DEC,ANN

2013 0.68,0.12a,0.86a,0.07z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00 z,1.66



Move out of the f*cking desert.
 
2013-10-27 12:52:27 PM  

SansNeural: "Cars can be washed with a solution that requires no water, but the concentrate costs $159 a gallon."

Er, whatcha gonna dilute it with?


More concentrate?

I'm guessing what they meant was, it's a solution that requires no rinsing. Of course that's just a guess, and I could be totally wrong.
 
2013-10-27 01:16:18 PM  
Reminds me of when I was stationed in Tuscon and there would be at least three car washes a week, in the dead of summer, on base.  Really, we're going to waste untold gallons of water in the middle of the desert summer so you can have a fundraiser for your BBQ?  fark you.
 
2013-10-27 01:17:38 PM  
Tucson.

Shows you how much I despised that place.
 
2013-10-27 02:01:16 PM  
More than once, the ones around her have had false advertising; girls in shorts waving the signs around, but guys actually doing the washing! Not cool.
 
2013-10-27 02:33:12 PM  
Considering the rain fall over most of the state this year, I'm surprised there isn't just flat out rationing.
 
2013-10-27 02:33:53 PM  

give me doughnuts: Some things are more important than a little environmental contamination.


Hit the one on the right with a soapy sponge and have her sent to my quarters.
 
2013-10-27 02:46:20 PM  

Repo Man: More than once, the ones around her have had false advertising; girls in shorts waving the signs around, but guys actually doing the washing! Not cool.


I got caught by one of those a few years back. The students selling the tickets were all these cute as a button cheerleader girls, and then you pull around the corner to where the washing is . . . and it's a bunch of D&D nerds.
 
2013-10-27 02:58:04 PM  
images4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-10-27 03:02:44 PM  

Trocadero: Considering the rain fall over most of the state this year, I'm surprised there isn't just flat out rationing.


After 20 years of gloom-and-doom, people kinda stop listening. Gloom-and-doom is still happening though...

On the other hand, we could water our lawns / take long showers / wash our cars to our heart's content if we made a few choices to cut out certain water-consuming things...

motherorganica.com
 
2013-10-27 03:04:45 PM  
P.S. Yeah, we consume way too much water.

switchboard.nrdc.org
 
2013-10-27 03:19:42 PM  
StopLurkListen: After 20 years of gloom-and-doom, people kinda stop listening. Gloom-and-doom is still happening though...

It's not just that people stop listening -- although that certainly happens. It's that progressive doom progressively becomes the new normal, and people either don't realize or can't remember that things used to be different. Of course, generally things have gotten worse because someone has profited from using something up, generally in a manner that's inefficient in all ways except short-term gain.

I've lived in many parts of the country, and I've seen this over and over again. The public has a short memory. People do not realize just how much we shiat where we eat.
 
2013-10-27 04:23:03 PM  
I, for one, am glad that the City of San Jose, California has taken these ne'er-do-wells to task. It's about time that these young ladies learned that their infrequent car washes might doom our environment and severely impact our ability to leave lights on in rooms we're not in, pour clean water down the drain to keep people from hearing what we're doing in the bathroom, produce semiconductor chips that require polluting chemicals for production, use processed oil products to build plastics that won't break down, and build cities that are dependent on individuals driving petroleum-powered cars that move only one person to-and-from a destination to properly operate.

These whores are a threat to our American way of life and thus our enemy.
 
2013-10-27 06:29:12 PM  

Quackadam: We would not want that soapy water polluting our poops!

Funny how "sewers" have all been renamed "storm drains".
People now think we have all these new underground plumbing that takes what goes down the toilet to a magic happy place and never seen or smelled again and the water that goes down the shower drain or through a sewer grate goes somewhere else and ends up in the cups that fish drink their water from.



Done in potato
 
2013-10-27 06:35:27 PM  
carefree cal

a joke in action
 
2013-10-27 07:27:25 PM  

Quackadam: chimp_ninja: I understand that San Jose has water issues, and that keeping phosphates, road debris, brake dust, etc. out of the storm drains probably makes economic and water quality sense.

But instead of banning the activity:

1) Require people to use biodegradable cleaning agents that don't contain those problematic ingredients.  Suggest rainwater for filling buckets-- rain barrels are very cheap and are helpful with gardening too.

2) Wash the cars on gravel or other porous surfaces so the excess goes into the ground, not into a drain that routes it directly to a river.

3) When the car wash is done, dump out the buckets and rinse the rags/sponges into sinks or toilets (so it gets treated), not storm drains (which go straight into rivers/etc.).

4) Or just partner up with a commercial car wash.  They use much less water, filter and re-use the water a few times, route all of their runoff into treated lines, and capture solid waste (dust, etc.) for disposal in the trash.

I have a porous driveway and a couple hundred gallons of rain storage.  My car is shiny, and nothing ends up in the storm drains.  It's not rocket science.

You are being satirical here right?


Hey guys!  Has anyone pointed out how ridiculously incorrect this Quackadam clown is?

Don't worry.  I'm sure he'll be along shortly to own up to his mistake.  No one on Fark ever "pulls a seagull" and craps on a thread then flies away like nothing happened.

dsmith42: Monthly rainfall totals for San Jose, CA:

YEAR JAN,FEB,MAR,APR,MAY,JUN,JUL,AUG,SEP,OCT,NOV,DEC,ANN

2013 0.68,0.12a,0.86a,0.07z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00z,0.00 z,1.66


Huh.  Never lived there, but I didn't realize how quickly it turns into desert.  San Jose is all of 50 miles from San Francisco.  All the more reason to discourage car washes, then.
 
2013-10-27 08:47:13 PM  

StopLurkListen: switchboard.nrdc.org


I'm not surprised that the aquifer around the Sacramento Valley is remaining stable.  Down in the floodplain, it is wet enough to grow rice.

The south valley is screwed, though.  They're starting to have issues with salt buildup.  They've also removed so much marshland that they're having problems with their water quality in their streams and rivers, resulting in a number of harsh new rules against farmers in order to protect fish.

Those guys could really use some GM plants with salt resistance inserted.


StopLurkListen: On the other hand, we could water our lawns / take long showers / wash our cars to our heart's content if we made a few choices to cut out certain water-consuming things...


A lot of places are starting to look at the amount of water it takes to produce beef and are questioning its long term viability at current production rates.  Growing cattle in arid and semi-arid locations may soon be a rarity.
 
2013-10-27 09:45:07 PM  
Hmm, I seem to recall seeing the message "NO DUMPING - GOES STRAIGHT TO BAY" (our something similar ) spray painted on the curb above storm drains in the bay area. Maybe it wasn't everywhere.

The aim is to reduce pollutants in runoff, but storm drain water is toxic enough as it is. Especially during the first rain of the season, you get all sorts of crap that cars and trucks leave on the pavement.
 
2013-10-27 10:58:36 PM  

cyberspacedout: Hmm, I seem to recall seeing the message "NO DUMPING - GOES STRAIGHT TO BAY" (our something similar ) spray painted on the curb above storm drains in the bay area. Maybe it wasn't everywhere.


A lot of California street drains go straight into water systems.  The drain in front of my house goes directly to the local creek, which eventually feeds to the river and to the ocean.

/Sacramento resident
 
2013-10-27 11:59:17 PM  

chimp_ninja: I understand that San Jose has water issues, and that keeping phosphates, road debris, brake dust, etc. out of the storm drains probably makes economic and water quality sense.
But instead of banning the activity:
1) Require people to use biodegradable cleaning agents that don't contain those problematic ingredients.  Suggest rainwater for filling buckets-- rain barrels are very cheap and are helpful with gardening too.
2) Wash the cars on gravel or other porous surfaces so the excess goes into the ground, not into a drain that routes it directly to a river.
3) When the car wash is done, dump out the buckets and rinse the rags/sponges into sinks or toilets (so it gets treated), not storm drains (which go straight into rivers/etc.).
4) Or just partner up with a commercial car wash.  They use much less water, filter and re-use the water a few times, route all of their runoff into treated lines, and capture solid waste (dust, etc.) for disposal in the trash.
I have a porous driveway and a couple hundred gallons of rain storage.  My car is shiny, and nothing ends up in the storm drains.  It's not rocket science.


Yes, that's what it says in TFA:
Loft said school groups could still hold car washes if they were conducted under certain conditions. Those include washing vehicles over grassy or gravel areas, ensuring wash water doesn't go into the street, gutter or storm drain and leaving no soap stains on the ground.


The actual article this brief is based on goes into more detail:

The Environmental Services Department offers these suggestions to school groups wanting to do car washes:
Conduct car washing over gravel, grassy area, or other earthen areas if possible.
Ensure that wash water (soapy or not) does not run into a street, gutter, or storm drain,
Wash water from paved areas should be collected and diverted either into the sanitary sewer system or a landscaped area.
Use different methods to protect the storm drain system. For example, block a storm drain on the parking lot used as a car wash zone, use a sump pump or wet/dry Shop-Vac to collect the wash water and pump it out to the sanitary sewer system.
Ensure no soap stains remain on the ground.
 
2013-10-28 01:14:55 AM  
California is as insane as florida anymore, need a CA flag.
 
2013-10-28 01:33:25 AM  
This is happening in a lot of places, not just San Jose, California. Kitsap County, Washington State, where I live (due west of Seattle on the other side of Puget Sound)  is a peninsula with Hood Canal on the east and Puget Sound on the west. All surface and storm water runoff ends up in one body of salt water or the other. We have had similar regulations about car washes for several years because of it.

http://www.kitsapgov.com/sswm/pdf/7036_washing.pdf

The Drain is for the Rain!
 
2013-10-28 09:28:41 AM  
i303.photobucket.com
cdn.ebaumsworld.com
 
2013-10-28 03:10:04 PM  

abiigdog: California is as insane as florida anymore, need a CA flag.


Couldn't agree more.  Gorgeous geography, crappy self righteous people.
 
2013-10-28 04:26:38 PM  

Krieghund: The actual article this brief is based on goes into more detail:

The Environmental Services Department offers these suggestions to school groups wanting to do car washes:
Conduct car washing over gravel, grassy area, or other earthen areas if possible.
Ensure that wash water (soapy or not) does not run into a street, gutter, or storm drain,
Wash water from paved areas should be collected and diverted either into the sanitary sewer system or a landscaped area.
Use different methods to protect the storm drain system. For example, block a storm drain on the parking lot used as a car wash zone, use a sump pump or wet/dry Shop-Vac to collect the wash water and pump it out to the sanitary sewer system.
Ensure no soap stains remain on the ground.


As the local stormwater inspector, this is exactly what we suggest to all of the student and charity carwashes, if they ask. Around here, they are also "banned", by County Ordinance, but we don't make a habit of ever shutting down these types of things. We turn a blind eye, mostly. I know of one outreach coordinator that used to occasionally stop and give suggestions, but that's as far as she ever took it. But if someone reaches out to us, we give them all the information necessary to have a car wash that won't pollute the waterways.

Also, Quackadam is an idiot.
 
2013-10-28 04:44:54 PM  

Dubb: Krieghund: The actual article this brief is based on goes into more detail:

The Environmental Services Department offers these suggestions to school groups wanting to do car washes:
Conduct car washing over gravel, grassy area, or other earthen areas if possible.
Ensure that wash water (soapy or not) does not run into a street, gutter, or storm drain,
Wash water from paved areas should be collected and diverted either into the sanitary sewer system or a landscaped area.
Use different methods to protect the storm drain system. For example, block a storm drain on the parking lot used as a car wash zone, use a sump pump or wet/dry Shop-Vac to collect the wash water and pump it out to the sanitary sewer system.
Ensure no soap stains remain on the ground.

As the local stormwater inspector, this is exactly what we suggest to all of the student and charity carwashes, if they ask. Around here, they are also "banned", by County Ordinance, but we don't make a habit of ever shutting down these types of things. We turn a blind eye, mostly. I know of one outreach coordinator that used to occasionally stop and give suggestions, but that's as far as she ever took it. But if someone reaches out to us, we give them all the information necessary to have a car wash that won't pollute the waterways.

Also, Quackadam is an idiot.


So...you don't do the job your paid for? More proof of Government over-regulation. There are laws/ordinances in place which you selectively enforce....it should not be a law then....
 
2013-10-28 05:14:07 PM  

ferretman: So...you don't do the job your paid for? More proof of Government over-regulation. There are laws/ordinances in place which you selectively enforce....it should not be a law then....


You've never been pulled over by a police officer and just given a warning?
 
2013-10-28 05:24:18 PM  

Lee451: "A liberal and his common sense are soon parted"


Right. It's not like we don't have wetlands around here, nor is it like this wash water isn't going directly into the bay, nor is it like San Jose didn't offer specific guidance on how they could still have car washes without polluting the local environment.

Nope, it's just silly libtards.
 
2013-10-28 05:32:35 PM  

abiigdog: California is as insane as florida anymore, need a CA flag.


And this article is evidence of that... how?
 
2013-10-28 10:09:05 PM  
Have the one on the left bathed covered with that $159/gal crap and bring her to my chambers.
 
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