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(NBC News)   New study finds that paying organ donors saves money, though the return process is a real biatch   (nbcnews.com) divider line 27
    More: Misc, wait list, blood donors  
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1319 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Oct 2013 at 9:15 AM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-10-25 09:19:40 AM
There may be indirect effects that swamp the benefit. There is a debate over paying for blood. My recollection is, you tend to get lower quality blood and discourage volunteers. I'm making $20 so I'll lie about my hard-to-detect illness. The other guy got $20 so why should I keep giving for free?
 
2013-10-25 09:21:37 AM
Semantics - if a person is being paid, can he/she still be considered a donor?
 
2013-10-25 09:24:33 AM
So we will actually start seeing people waking up in bath tubs full of ice.
 
2013-10-25 09:26:00 AM

Nogale: Semantics - if a person is being paid, can he/she still be considered a donor?


Semantics looks like semen.
 
2013-10-25 09:35:16 AM
 
2013-10-25 09:48:06 AM
The problem is that scarcity is caused when people are valuing their organs more than the $0 they'd get for handing them over.
 
2013-10-25 09:52:07 AM
I donated a kidney to my brother two weeks ago. I never really considered a donation until a family member needed one. I do think I will donate blood more often now. I don't think money would have changed any thing.
 
2013-10-25 09:52:08 AM
$10,000 for a kidney? Hmmm...
 
2013-10-25 09:54:40 AM

ZAZ: There may be indirect effects that swamp the benefit. There is a debate over paying for blood. My recollection is, you tend to get lower quality blood and discourage volunteers. I'm making $20 so I'll lie about my hard-to-detect illness. The other guy got $20 so why should I keep giving for free


They're also missing out on my premium O-Neg blood. I wouldn't give up a pint for less than $100. And in the event of my untimely death, my organs become very valuable. So if you aren't going to compensate my family for them, than too bad. They can get cremated along with the rest of me.

The medical industry has quite a scam going. They make a lot of money from other people's donation under the myth that it's for the common good.
 
2013-10-25 09:55:34 AM
It's a nice theory, but there hasn't ever been a real-world "pay for donations" system that I'd want to live under.

The Philippines tried one for a while. They abandonded it when it turned out to be a disaster for both the donors and the recipients.

Commercial organ transplantation is harmful not only to individuals selling kidneys. Studies investigating health outcomes for recipients of purchased organs also reveal serious problems with commercially acquired organs.18 Both organ brokers and transplant physicians profit when someone buys an organ. The pressure to maximize earnings from commercial organ transplantation can lead to substandard selection of organ providers.

...
Proponents of the Philippines' commercial market in organ transplants claim that buying and selling kidneys benefits both individuals who sell kidneys as well as recipients of transplants. This utilitarian mode of analysis neglects basic ethical questions about whether organs ought to be purchased and sold through market mechanisms. In addition, it overstates benefits for buyers and sellers and underestimates the extent to which organ providers and organ recipients can be harmed through commercial organ transplantation.
 
2013-10-25 09:56:14 AM
I should also add that I might be persuaded to donate my organs if the transplant and all follow up care and pharmaceuticals were provided to the recipient for free as well.
 
2013-10-25 10:00:17 AM

NewWorldDan: I should also add that I might be persuaded to donate my organs if the transplant and all follow up care and pharmaceuticals were provided to the recipient for free as well.


That would be nice. My brother will be paying for anti rejection meds for the rest of his life and it is costly.
 
2013-10-25 10:02:14 AM

misguided: I donated a kidney to my brother two weeks ago. I never really considered a donation until a family member needed one. I do think I will donate blood more often now. I don't think money would have changed any thing.


Awesome! I hope it lasts him a long time.

You've more than doubled* your brother's life expectancy, compared to dialysis.

/*On average. Some get more, a small percentage reject the transplant, and some go chasing beer trucks.
 
2013-10-25 10:03:54 AM

misguided: NewWorldDan: I should also add that I might be persuaded to donate my organs if the transplant and all follow up care and pharmaceuticals were provided to the recipient for free as well.

That would be nice. My brother will be paying for anti rejection meds for the rest of his life and it is costly.


If your brother lives in the US, I think Medicare will pay some of that cost for the first three years (even if he didn't previously qualify for Medicare - this applies to all ages). I'd look into it, if you haven't already.
 
2013-10-25 10:09:33 AM

draypresct: misguided: NewWorldDan: I should also add that I might be persuaded to donate my organs if the transplant and all follow up care and pharmaceuticals were provided to the recipient for free as well.

That would be nice. My brother will be paying for anti rejection meds for the rest of his life and it is costly.

If your brother lives in the US, I think Medicare will pay some of that cost for the first three years (even if he didn't previously qualify for Medicare - this applies to all ages). I'd look into it, if you haven't already.


We haven't looked into that.Thanks.
 
2013-10-25 10:13:18 AM

draypresct: misguided: I donated a kidney to my brother two weeks ago. I never really considered a donation until a family member needed one. I do think I will donate blood more often now. I don't think money would have changed any thing.

Awesome! I hope it lasts him a long time.

You've more than doubled* your brother's life expectancy, compared to dialysis.

/*On average. Some get more, a small percentage reject the transplant, and some go chasing beer trucks.


Thanks, He already looks and feels better,it doesn't look like he's rejecting. Hopefully he will be around for as long time.
 
2013-10-25 10:20:14 AM
Ethical issues? You bet. The only people who are going to sell their organs are those desperate for money. Essentially, this is exploitation of the poor. And don't feed me bs about how nobody's being forced to do it.
 
2013-10-25 10:29:30 AM

misguided: draypresct: misguided: NewWorldDan: I should also add that I might be persuaded to donate my organs if the transplant and all follow up care and pharmaceuticals were provided to the recipient for free as well.

That would be nice. My brother will be paying for anti rejection meds for the rest of his life and it is costly.

If your brother lives in the US, I think Medicare will pay some of that cost for the first three years (even if he didn't previously qualify for Medicare - this applies to all ages). I'd look into it, if you haven't already.

We haven't looked into that.Thanks.


Medicare will pay for them for 3 years.

/on waiting list for a kidney
 
2013-10-25 10:35:09 AM

Krymson Tyde: misguided: draypresct: misguided: NewWorldDan: I should also add that I might be persuaded to donate my organs if the transplant and all follow up care and pharmaceuticals were provided to the recipient for free as well.

That would be nice. My brother will be paying for anti rejection meds for the rest of his life and it is costly.

If your brother lives in the US, I think Medicare will pay some of that cost for the first three years (even if he didn't previously qualify for Medicare - this applies to all ages). I'd look into it, if you haven't already.

We haven't looked into that.Thanks.

Medicare will pay for them for 3 years.

/on waiting list for a kidney


Good luck! I hope you get one soon! Thanks for the info too.
 
2013-10-25 11:46:33 AM
I see all sorts of unintended consequences if this becomes reality, but it is a nice thought experiment.  But I see little difference between this, and selling a child.

My father received a kidney from his second cousin.  I highly doubt he cousin would have sold the kidney.

And if anyone is silly enough to believe they would only cost $10K, then I have some good investment advice:  PM me for my bank account info.
 
2013-10-25 12:19:28 PM
One way to get money from the top tiers to trickle down from the top percent of money holders to the lower percent is to let them buy organs. I'm not sure what a kidney goes for but having two of them I'd probably let one go on Ebay with a fairly healthy reserve price. Why would people willingly give up an organ for donation knowing Larry Hagman or that drunk from Crosby Steals Some Hash are gonna swoop in and get it? If they want to pay to get to the front of the line, they can pay me!
 
2013-10-25 12:25:17 PM

rudemix: One way to get money from the top tiers to trickle down from the top percent of money holders to the lower percent is to let them buy organs. I'm not sure what a kidney goes for but having two of them I'd probably let one go on Ebay with a fairly healthy reserve price. Why would people willingly give up an organ for donation knowing Larry Hagman or that drunk from Crosby Steals Some Hash are gonna swoop in and get it? If they want to pay to get to the front of the line, they can pay me!


Livers are allocated according to need, not wait time. Otherwise everyone on Fark would join a liver waiting list today and start accumulating wait time for when we'd inevitibly need one.

Kidneys are allocated according to wait time (kind of, mostly . . . it's complicated).
 
2013-10-25 12:52:46 PM

NewWorldDan: I might be persuaded to donate my organs if the transplant and all follow up care and pharmaceuticals were provided to the recipient for free as well


I am in line to donate a kidney.

1) All the donation-related expenses will be paid by the recipient's insurance
2) With the Affordable Care Act, I will be able to get insurance for my future non-kidney-related expenses. (Thanks Obama!)
 
2013-10-25 12:57:08 PM
Getting money back for the kidney might help some people feel more interested in donating one.  It's not free and painless to give up a kidney.  It's not even like blood that okay, there's a needle  prick and you'll spend most of your lunch hour going down and  giving blood, but it's still worth that little hassle to do something nice.  It's serious surgery.  You're going to have to miss some work to do it.  And you're going to have some recovery time.  And you're going to be without one of your two kidneys forever.  With blood, you're making more pretty quickly and are never going to be at any higher risk yourself for having shared a pint.  With letting someone have a kidney, if anything ever goes wrong with your own, you're short one.  Yes, for most folks, the redundant kidney is not ever going to be necessary, but it is still a sacrifice that might possibly endanger your own health in the future.  One of my mother's husbands a few years back needed a kidney and I wasn't interested in getting myself tested to see if I was a match because of the hassle, pain, costs, and risks involved in being a donor.  And that was for someone I knew, someone that a relative I dearly love loved.  I wouldn't have considered it at all for a stranger.  Something that might have off-set the cons of donating might have swayed me. 

If you don't want or don't need the money, you can give it away or donate it to charity.  Having it be offered to people who might want it would be nice.
 
2013-10-25 04:23:40 PM

misguided: Krymson Tyde: misguided: draypresct: misguided: NewWorldDan: I should also add that I might be persuaded to donate my organs if the transplant and all follow up care and pharmaceuticals were provided to the recipient for free as well.

That would be nice. My brother will be paying for anti rejection meds for the rest of his life and it is costly.

If your brother lives in the US, I think Medicare will pay some of that cost for the first three years (even if he didn't previously qualify for Medicare - this applies to all ages). I'd look into it, if you haven't already.

We haven't looked into that.Thanks.

Medicare will pay for them for 3 years.

/on waiting list for a kidney

Good luck! I hope you get one soon! Thanks for the info too.


Thank you. I hope all goes well with your brother.
 
2013-10-25 05:16:41 PM
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/10/09/georgia-teens-body-found-stuffed -with-newspaper-after-his-autopsy/
 
2013-10-25 05:32:23 PM
Or the donors should get a 10,000 lotto numbers (yeah, that's the ticket)
 
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