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(WTKR)   Navy to issue new, flame-resistant uniforms to sailors soon (as opposed to the current ones that are highly flammable and drip melting nylon) With epic vid of the testing process   (wtkr.com) divider line 47
    More: Interesting, navies, psychological testing, sailors soon, production schedule, engineering department, inherent risk, U.S. Fleet Forces, ADM  
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4479 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Oct 2013 at 11:31 AM (25 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



47 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-10-25 11:36:09 AM
I'll bet that's about as comfortable as a burlap sack.
 
2013-10-25 11:42:06 AM
If only there was something around to help put these fires out quickly, maybe something they could jump in.
 
2013-10-25 11:43:35 AM

Gaambit: If only there was something around to help put these fires out quickly, maybe something they could jump in.


Marine Core Dip?
 
2013-10-25 11:44:27 AM

Gaambit: If only there was something around to help put these fires out quickly, maybe something they could jump in.


Maybe something that surrounded those long, hard tubes filled with seamen?
 
2013-10-25 11:47:36 AM
There was a flaming sailor in the Village People.
 
2013-10-25 11:49:10 AM
Cool now when I catch a little chill I can stuff a blowtorch down my pants.
 
2013-10-25 11:51:16 AM
So many flaming sailor jokes possible here...
 
2013-10-25 11:56:12 AM
(Read in Beavis' voice):
Fire, Fire, Fire!
 
2013-10-25 11:58:00 AM

Gaambit: If only there was something around to help put these fires out quickly, maybe something they could jump in.


Actually the silly blue camo pattern they've been having them wear recently is GREAT camouflage--if you end up overboard.  Great thinking, uniform designers!
 
2013-10-25 11:58:10 AM
Next week:
"Turns out, our new FRV is FUBAR, because it combines with JP-5 to form a gelatin that has flesh-dissolving attributes.  Commands are advised to continue using the issued FRV until such time as we have developed a low-lint, fire-resistant, non-flesh-dissolving alternative."
 
2013-10-25 11:59:45 AM

Gaambit: If only there was something around to help put these fires out quickly, maybe something they could jump in.


Not everyone in the Navy is on a ship. Just sayin.
 
2013-10-25 12:00:11 PM
This is old news. This was debated in the senate a couple years ago. The process of making the uniforms flame retardant is so bad for the environment that the manufacturing is not allowed in the US. Of course many people of the Nascar persuasion had a problem with this due to 'Merca.

who cares if soldiers are prone to melting and dying or severely maimed as long as their Uniforms are made in the good ole US of A!
 
2013-10-25 12:01:36 PM

TheShavingofOccam123: Gaambit: If only there was something around to help put these fires out quickly, maybe something they could jump in.

Marine Core Dip?


Excellent
 
2013-10-25 12:02:11 PM
Every since the Village People appeared there is way the Navy is putting that fire out now.
 
2013-10-25 12:02:44 PM

abhorrent1: Gaambit: If only there was something around to help put these fires out quickly, maybe something they could jump in.

Not everyone in the Navy is on a ship. Just sayin.


Nor are most of them on deck where they could jump.  Also if you are on a carrier jumping off from that height may not be the best idea.
 
2013-10-25 12:04:45 PM
No capes!
 
2013-10-25 12:12:15 PM
But does it breathe?

I'm guessing it doesn't.
 
2013-10-25 12:16:18 PM

dkulprit: This is old news. This was debated in the senate a couple years ago. The process of making the uniforms flame retardant is so bad for the environment that the manufacturing is not allowed in the US. Of course many people of the Nascar persuasion had a problem with this due to 'Merca.

who cares if soldiers are prone to melting and dying or severely maimed as long as their Uniforms are made in the good ole US of A!


Except for the USMC uniforms that are fire retardant and made in the USA
 
2013-10-25 12:17:41 PM
There's a small naval detachment where I'm stationed.

I always wonder what was the rationale behind thier uniform's color scheme...was it so they could blend in with the water?
 
2013-10-25 12:20:34 PM

Savage Bacon: But does it breathe?

I'm guessing it doesn't.


What's most important is that it presents a Sharp Military Appearance.   We can't have the head cleaners (Shiater scrubers) looking like janitors.
 
2013-10-25 12:22:39 PM
Are they made of safe, natural helium? It's actually flame retardant!!
 
2013-10-25 12:31:21 PM

dkulprit: This is old news. This was debated in the senate a couple years ago. The process of making the uniforms flame retardant is so bad for the environment that the manufacturing is not allowed in the US. Of course many people of the Nascar persuasion had a problem with this due to 'Merca.

who cares if soldiers are prone to melting and dying or severely maimed as long as their Uniforms are made in the good ole US of A!


regarding the Senate mentioning how the process of making the uniforms is bad for the environment, they should see all the shiat thrown overboard...I've heard stories (husband is Navy).

(I would have just bolded that section of your reply, but I'm on mobile)
 
2013-10-25 12:36:00 PM

Minerva8918: they should see all the shiat thrown overboard...I've heard stories (husband is Navy).


Now imagine the Russian or Chinese fleets and what they dump overboard.  They REALLY couldn't care less.
 
2013-10-25 12:37:39 PM
/ I know. "So original".
 
2013-10-25 12:40:37 PM

sonarbison: There's a small naval detachment where I'm stationed.

I always wonder what was the rationale behind thier uniform's color scheme...was it so they could blend in with the water?



The Admirals in the US Navy saw that the USMC and US Army were getting new uniforms and didn't want to miss an opportunity to funnel money to their good friends in the defence industry.

/blue is a naval colour
//it also means they couldn't copy what the USMC and Army were doing
 
2013-10-25 12:41:37 PM

Norfolking Chance: sonarbison: There's a small naval detachment where I'm stationed.

I always wonder what was the rationale behind thier uniform's color scheme...was it so they could blend in with the water?


The Admirals in the US Navy saw that the USMC and US Army were getting new uniforms and didn't want to miss an opportunity to funnel money to their good friends in the defence industry.

/blue is a naval colour
//it also means they couldn't copy what the USMC and Army were doing


But it seriously does blend in with the water when people fall overboard.  I mean, DUMB.
 
2013-10-25 12:41:39 PM
When I joined in 1971 the Navy had just changed from the denim dungarees and chambray shirt uniforms to the first synthetic ones.
They soon found those had the same problem, (a spark would ignite the new jumper top and cause it to go up like a ball of steel wool, melting to the wearer's body.)

They eventually went back to chambray and denim, but I guess that didn't last long. They looked to cool to let sailors keep using them.
It was when they dropped the Donald Duck whites that I got really sad. The reason I picked the Navy in the first place was because it was the only service where enlisted personnel didn't have to wear a suitcoat and necktie.
 
2013-10-25 12:49:07 PM
Well, I feel bad for that sailors hands and head...
 
2013-10-25 12:51:56 PM

JohnAnnArbor: Norfolking Chance: sonarbison: There's a small naval detachment where I'm stationed.

I always wonder what was the rationale behind thier uniform's color scheme...was it so they could blend in with the water?


The Admirals in the US Navy saw that the USMC and US Army were getting new uniforms and didn't want to miss an opportunity to funnel money to their good friends in the defence industry.

/blue is a naval colour
//it also means they couldn't copy what the USMC and Army were doing

But it seriously does blend in with the water when people fall overboard.  I mean, DUMB.


Hate to break it to you, but seawater is clear. If you're close enough to a person to see them as more than a black dot on the horizon, it doesn't matter what color their clothes are. They're gonna have an orange life jacket or life ring, anyway, and hopefully a smoke float.

/NWUs were/are still really stupid. Heavy, uncomfortable, and issued only so that we'd be dressed more like the Air Force, Army and Marines. It's a camo pattern that's NOT INTENDED AS CAMOUFLAGE, and is not to be worn in the field. Just a big pile of stupid.
 
2013-10-25 01:06:45 PM

mbillips: JohnAnnArbor: Norfolking Chance: sonarbison: There's a small naval detachment where I'm stationed.

I always wonder what was the rationale behind thier uniform's color scheme...was it so they could blend in with the water?


The Admirals in the US Navy saw that the USMC and US Army were getting new uniforms and didn't want to miss an opportunity to funnel money to their good friends in the defence industry.

/blue is a naval colour
//it also means they couldn't copy what the USMC and Army were doing

But it seriously does blend in with the water when people fall overboard.  I mean, DUMB.

Hate to break it to you, but seawater is clear. If you're close enough to a person to see them as more than a black dot on the horizon, it doesn't matter what color their clothes are. They're gonna have an orange life jacket or life ring, anyway, and hopefully a smoke float.

/NWUs were/are still really stupid. Heavy, uncomfortable, and issued only so that we'd be dressed more like the Air Force, Army and Marines. It's a camo pattern that's NOT INTENDED AS CAMOUFLAGE, and is not to be worn in the field. Just a big pile of stupid.


Anecdote. And the Navy secretary's opinion.
 
2013-10-25 01:13:18 PM
Sailors soaked in AVGAS are surpisingly flammable, regardless of what they are wearing.
 
2013-10-25 01:24:04 PM

Norfolking Chance: sonarbison: There's a small naval detachment where I'm stationed.

I always wonder what was the rationale behind thier uniform's color scheme...was it so they could blend in with the water?


The Admirals in the US Navy saw that the USMC and US Army were getting new uniforms and didn't want to miss an opportunity to funnel money to their good friends in the defence industry.

/blue is a naval colour
//it also means they couldn't copy what the USMC and Army were doing


Dungarees, the traditional Navy working uniform were not allowed to be worn off of Navy bases.   They got dirty so easy, they didn't look good most of the time, so Sailors, if they lived off base, had to come to work in civilian clothes (or the uniform of the day), change into dungarees, then change back when they went home.     CPO and Officers wore Khaki uniforms and were allowed to commute in their working uniforms.

The camouflaged uniforms were designed with hiding dirt and grease in mind.    It replaced dungarees, and was allowed to be worn off base when commuting.

/US Navy 1984-1990
//MM1(SW)
 
2013-10-25 01:28:25 PM

MythDragon: Sailors soaked in AVGAS are surpisingly flammable, regardless of what they are wearing.


Navy ships don't have AVGAS on board.   The Navy uses JP-5, which is much more like Diesel, on board ships.   In fact, it is so close to diesel, on my ship, we used JP-5 in our emergency diesel generator and all of our diesel powered small boats.

We burned DFM (Diesel Fuel Marine) in our Ship's boilers.      My carrier friends that worked on Conventional Carriers, said they burned JP-5 in the boilers.   That way refueling ships only had to deliver 1 kind of fuel to the carrier.
 
2013-10-25 01:32:41 PM

weiserfireman: MythDragon: Sailors soaked in AVGAS are surpisingly flammable, regardless of what they are wearing.

Navy ships don't have AVGAS on board.   The Navy uses JP-5, which is much more like Diesel, on board ships.   In fact, it is so close to diesel, on my ship, we used JP-5 in our emergency diesel generator and all of our diesel powered small boats.

We burned DFM (Diesel Fuel Marine) in our Ship's boilers.      My carrier friends that worked on Conventional Carriers, said they burned JP-5 in the boilers.   That way refueling ships only had to deliver 1 kind of fuel to the carrier.


I think they're up to JP-7 now, but your point stands. Most of the fleet today is nuclear/steam turbine, diesel engine or gas turbine, and the latter two burn the same fuel. AVGAS went out with piston engines in the '50s.
 
2013-10-25 01:33:03 PM

Quinzy: abhorrent1: Gaambit: If only there was something around to help put these fires out quickly, maybe something they could jump in.

Not everyone in the Navy is on a ship. Just sayin.

Nor are most of them on deck where they could jump.  Also if you are on a carrier jumping off from that height may not be the best idea.


Aye, try quickly getting to a place to jump overboard from Engine Room 2, lower platform.  That's why engineering guys and gals have been using flame-resistant clothing this whole time.

FTA:  Flame resistant organizational clothing had previously been limited to Sailors working in engineering departments, on flight decks and in other high-risk areas, but the Organizational Clothing Working Group recommended every Sailor afloat be outfitted with the additional protection.

The problem is that many people work closely to these areas or in proximity to equipment that can (and does) catch fire under malfunction, but haven't had the clothing to keep them from joining the exothermic party.  This is a Good Move™.

This cutaway helps illustrate the problem in the extreme case (a carrier).
 
2013-10-25 01:37:00 PM

mbillips: AVGAS went out with piston engines in the '50s.


I assume they still had to have some around for the Skyraiders during Vietnam.
 
2013-10-25 01:41:04 PM
weiserfireman: Norfolking Chance: sonarbison: There's a small naval detachment where I'm stationed.

I always wonder what was the rationale behind thier uniform's color scheme...was it so they could blend in with the water?


The Admirals in the US Navy saw that the USMC and US Army were getting new uniforms and didn't want to miss an opportunity to funnel money to their good friends in the defence industry.

/blue is a naval colour
//it also means they couldn't copy what the USMC and Army were doing

Dungarees, the traditional Navy working uniform were not allowed to be worn off of Navy bases.   They got dirty so easy, they didn't look good most of the time, so Sailors, if they lived off base, had to come to work in civilian clothes (or the uniform of the day), change into dungarees, then change back when they went home.     CPO and Officers wore Khaki uniforms and were allowed to commute in their working uniforms.

The camouflaged uniforms were designed with hiding dirt and grease in mind.    It replaced dungarees, and was allowed to be worn off base when commuting.


As a former deck ape on a destroyer in the '80s, and current Reservist, I can't see how NWUs really hide dirt that well. Dungarees were a flame-retardant, at-sea uniform (we didn't start wearing coveralls on surface ships until the '90s). The Navy should have just relaxed the off-base rules about dungarees; it was one thing when the civilian world went about in dresses and suits, and another thing today when everyone wears jeans or shorts all the time. You're not supposed to go ashore in a paint-spattered, dirty uniform, anyway, NWU or not. When I was in the fleet, I had 2-3 shipboard uniforms that were fairly trashed with paint, and one good-looking set when I had to go onto the base.

The only problem with dungarees is that they looked really bad on fatties. NWUs are looser and more forgiving.
 
2013-10-25 01:45:17 PM

weiserfireman: MythDragon: Sailors soaked in AVGAS are surpisingly flammable, regardless of what they are wearing.

Navy ships don't have AVGAS on board.   The Navy uses JP-5, which is much more like Diesel, on board ships.   In fact, it is so close to diesel, on my ship, we used JP-5 in our emergency diesel generator and all of our diesel powered small boats.

We burned DFM (Diesel Fuel Marine) in our Ship's boilers.      My carrier friends that worked on Conventional Carriers, said they burned JP-5 in the boilers.   That way refueling ships only had to deliver 1 kind of fuel to the carrier.



What does the C-2 use then? Same thing?
 
2013-10-25 01:45:25 PM

Seraphym: Aye, try quickly getting to a place to jump overboard from Engine Room 2, lower platform. While on fire


You left something out
 
2013-10-25 02:26:20 PM
I do believe that's Thermo-Man.
 
2013-10-25 02:31:20 PM
Glad to see we've learned nothing from Jutland...
 
2013-10-25 02:37:57 PM

MythDragon: weiserfireman: MythDragon: Sailors soaked in AVGAS are surpisingly flammable, regardless of what they are wearing.

Navy ships don't have AVGAS on board.   The Navy uses JP-5, which is much more like Diesel, on board ships.   In fact, it is so close to diesel, on my ship, we used JP-5 in our emergency diesel generator and all of our diesel powered small boats.

We burned DFM (Diesel Fuel Marine) in our Ship's boilers.      My carrier friends that worked on Conventional Carriers, said they burned JP-5 in the boilers.   That way refueling ships only had to deliver 1 kind of fuel to the carrier.


What does the C-2 use then? Same thing?


Same JP-5 all the other jet aircraft use.    And yes, the C-2 is a jet aircraft.   It uses a small jet-turbine engine to power it's propellors,  ie Turbo-Prop.    They use the thrust from the Prop instead of the exhaust thrust of the turbine engine to provide the thrust.

The flame propagation speed and the low flash point of JP-4 and JP-8 make them dangerous on board a ship.   The flame front of fire on a JP-4 spill can run the length of a small ship in less than a second.   JP-5 burns at a much slower pace.  It has the same flashpoint as marine diesel.
 
2013-10-25 03:06:21 PM

mbillips: JohnAnnArbor: Norfolking Chance: sonarbison: There's a small naval detachment where I'm stationed.

I always wonder what was the rationale behind thier uniform's color scheme...was it so they could blend in with the water?


The Admirals in the US Navy saw that the USMC and US Army were getting new uniforms and didn't want to miss an opportunity to funnel money to their good friends in the defence industry.

/blue is a naval colour
//it also means they couldn't copy what the USMC and Army were doing

But it seriously does blend in with the water when people fall overboard.  I mean, DUMB.

Hate to break it to you, but seawater is clear. If you're close enough to a person to see them as more than a black dot on the horizon, it doesn't matter what color their clothes are. They're gonna have an orange life jacket or life ring, anyway, and hopefully a smoke float.

/NWUs were/are still really stupid. Heavy, uncomfortable, and issued only so that we'd be dressed more like the Air Force, Army and Marines. It's a camo pattern that's NOT INTENDED AS CAMOUFLAGE, and is not to be worn in the field. Just a big pile of stupid.


I'm gonna go ahead and recommend this as Navy camouflage. At least it has a chance of working, slim though that chance may be.
ecx.images-amazon.com
 
2013-10-25 05:09:27 PM

Norfolking Chance: sonarbison: There's a small naval detachment where I'm stationed.

I always wonder what was the rationale behind thier uniform's color scheme...was it so they could blend in with the water?


The Admirals in the US Navy saw that the USMC and US Army were getting new uniforms and didn't want to miss an opportunity to funnel money to their good friends in the defence industry.

/blue is a naval colour
//it also means they couldn't copy what the USMC and Army were doing


I heard and Im not sure its true that the USMC patented their camo pattern which prevents other services from using it.
 
2013-10-25 09:34:31 PM

bigbadideasinaction: So many flaming sailor jokes possible here...


In the Navy/
you can get disfigured fast
In the Navy/
your togs are quite the blast
In the Navy/
you'll enjoy the flaming mo'
In the Navy/
In the Navy.
 
2013-10-25 10:09:56 PM
I'd think Navy personnel would be looking into bulletproof uniforms these days...
 
2013-10-26 08:46:57 AM

weiserfireman: Norfolking Chance: sonarbison: There's a small naval detachment where I'm stationed.

I always wonder what was the rationale behind thier uniform's color scheme...was it so they could blend in with the water?


The Admirals in the US Navy saw that the USMC and US Army were getting new uniforms and didn't want to miss an opportunity to funnel money to their good friends in the defence industry.

/blue is a naval colour
//it also means they couldn't copy what the USMC and Army were doing

Dungarees, the traditional Navy working uniform were not allowed to be worn off of Navy bases.   They got dirty so easy, they didn't look good most of the time, so Sailors, if they lived off base, had to come to work in civilian clothes (or the uniform of the day), change into dungarees, then change back when they went home.     CPO and Officers wore Khaki uniforms and were allowed to commute in their working uniforms.

The camouflaged uniforms were designed with hiding dirt and grease in mind.    It replaced dungarees, and was allowed to be worn off base when commuting.

/US Navy 1984-1990
//MM1(SW)


So they did this ridiculous and horrible looking pseudo-camouflage uniform so that it would hide dirt?

Wow.  That's really stupid.  Not quite as stupid as making it out of a material that would go up in a fireball, of course.
 
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