If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Modern Farmer)   Modern Farmer says Thomas Jefferson was terrible with crops but excellent at slavery   (modernfarmer.com) divider line 68
    More: Interesting, Thomas Jefferson, crops, Library of Congress, American South, Monticello  
•       •       •

4437 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Oct 2013 at 10:11 PM (25 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



68 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-10-24 10:14:48 PM

"We will try this winter to cover our garden with a heavy coat of manure."


By inviting some politicians over to see his garden.

 
2013-10-24 10:16:15 PM
He was also terrible at personal finance. Bankrupted the family several times, IIRC. Also, Monticello is beautiful but the main house is a whole lot smaller than I expected.

/wonder how many other of the Founding Fathers would not have been in the 1%
 
2013-10-24 10:17:21 PM

skinink: "We will try this winter to cover our garden with a heavy coat of manure."
By inviting some politicians over to see his garden.


Bet THAT was a memorable Christmas. Phee-eew.
 
2013-10-24 10:18:40 PM
His best crop, the most profit, was for hemp.  Probably because it grows anywhere without much worry.  Made a fortune off of it and then died.
 
2013-10-24 10:22:57 PM
Learning what doesn't work is still progress.
 
2013-10-24 10:25:15 PM

brimed03: He was also terrible at personal finance. Bankrupted the family several times, IIRC. Also, Monticello is beautiful but the main house is a whole lot smaller than I expected.

/wonder how many other of the Founding Fathers would not have been in the 1%


John Adams was not anywhere near off. In fact, he's the reason Presidents draw a salary- Washington was pressing Congress to not include a salary for the post, with the idea that public service should be a sacrifice. Adams, being from a more humble background, recognized that that would exclude everyone but the idle rich, and quietly pushed back.

In terms of Jefferson, Jefferson's failures as a farmer and failures at personal fiance were, shall we say, somewhat related.
 
2013-10-24 10:26:00 PM

cptjeff: John Adams was not anywhere near well off.


I english gud tonight.
 
2013-10-24 10:27:40 PM
It sounds more like his failures were mainly due to experimenting with new crops and methods. The article focused on his failures but I wonder what innovations he might have come up with.
 
2013-10-24 10:28:48 PM

brimed03: He was also terrible at personal finance. Bankrupted the family several times, IIRC. Also, Monticello is beautiful but the main house is a whole lot smaller than I expected.

/wonder how many other of the Founding Fathers would not have been in the 1%


You, should visit some more ex-Presidents houses. Hermitage(A.Jackson's home) is quite small and he added on all his life. Monroe's and Madison's weren't that big either.
/ Oh, and any one of the 1% could buy the 13 states back then.
 
2013-10-24 10:33:09 PM

brimed03: He was also terrible at personal finance. Bankrupted the family several times, IIRC. Also, Monticello is beautiful but the main house is a whole lot smaller than I expected.

/wonder how many other of the Founding Fathers would not have been in the 1%


I've been told that his money problems were the reason he sold his entire ~6000 volume library to Congress, and that by the time he died, he had amassed another 6000.
 
2013-10-24 10:35:32 PM
Old news is really really old.
 
2013-10-24 10:37:30 PM
The important thing is to try and try and try again and learn from your mistakes. Like the stories of Edison trying 10000 experiments for the lightbulb. Edison and Jefferson were not motivated by money, but by seeking a better way. I salute both.
 
2013-10-24 10:38:22 PM
I toured Monticello last summer, and whatever else you can say about the man, he was unquestionably a multi--talented genius.
 
2013-10-24 10:39:36 PM
IIRC (see wiki) he wanted or tried to include provisions against slavery right in the Bill of Rights but they were scrapped.
 
2013-10-24 10:39:44 PM
One of the most productive of Jefferson's ventures was making nails He had slaves make nails for him which he sold to surrounding farmers and merchants. Of all the founding fathers, Jefferson came up the shortest when compared to his written words.

Washington for example left instructions for his slaves to be freed upon his death. Jefferson's slaves stayed in bondage after he died.
 
2013-10-24 10:46:29 PM

cyberspacedout: brimed03: He was also terrible at personal finance. Bankrupted the family several times, IIRC. Also, Monticello is beautiful but the main house is a whole lot smaller than I expected.

/wonder how many other of the Founding Fathers would not have been in the 1%

I've been told that his money problems were the reason he sold his entire ~6000 volume library to Congress, and that by the time he died, he had amassed another 6000.


Monticello is somewhat smaller than Mt. Vernon, but Jefferson had a sense of economy and a fierce notion of proper architecture.  He made his bed part of a wall separating two rooms, with storage over and under to save space; he also hated staircases, so made them as small and as steep as possible.  He strove for efficiency, and had a dumbwaiter bring wine from the cellar, as well as rotating doors to serve food, so the servants would not be able to listen in to table talk.

He screwed up with a pendulum clock however; it ran for seven days but the cables were only five days long, so he cut holes in the floor to accommodate them.

He donated his library when the Library of Congress burned, quickly found himself miserable without books, and so amassed more.

Monticello is small because there was no central heat in those days, all heat had to be lugged in the form of firewood.  A big house is a cold house.
 
2013-10-24 10:53:56 PM
If you look closely at the supposed evidence, it's still very much in debate whether Jefferson (Thomas) inserted his penis into Sally Hemings, or not. It's probably more likely it was someone else for his family, but that headline is not nearly so catchy.
 
2013-10-24 10:56:19 PM

big pig peaches: It sounds more like his failures were mainly due to experimenting with new crops and methods. The article focused on his failures but I wonder what innovations he might have come up with.


Most famously, he was one of the first to cultivate and eat tomatoes, then thought poisonous. Not his original idea -- their beneficent nature was introduced to him by an acquaintance of his, Doctor Siccary. Still, TJ deserves much of the credit for their popularity.
 
2013-10-24 10:57:28 PM

Phil McKraken: Learning what doesn't work is still progress.


This.  His written observations of what didn't are as valuable as for those that did.
 
2013-10-24 10:58:06 PM
Well I do remember reading this from somewhere, probably in my history book in high school.
 
2013-10-24 10:59:24 PM
"To admit your failures, to write them down - to me, it means it is about education."

I own rental property, my dad did it for 40 years and I am just now starting to learn it. I fail almost every day, but I am amazed on craigslist the people who ask help to change a electrical socket or tile a floor. Few years ago I would of called a contractor, now I can refurbish a whole house on a limited budget within a few days. And this is coming from someone who couldn't even pick up a screw driver when I was younger.

/I was a butterfinger, I could drive a lawnmower and cut grass at 6 yrs old (Gravely tractor) but putting screws in a board they would be crooked every time, i guess experience DOES matter in life :)
 
2013-10-24 11:02:43 PM

cptjeff: cptjeff: John Adams was not anywhere near well off.

I english gud tonight.


Ummm...  why did you highlight that single word and question it?
I really don't understand.
 
2013-10-24 11:09:30 PM

tinfoil-hat maggie: brimed03: He was also terrible at personal finance. Bankrupted the family several times, IIRC. Also, Monticello is beautiful but the main house is a whole lot smaller than I expected.

/wonder how many other of the Founding Fathers would not have been in the 1%

You, should visit some more ex-Presidents houses. Hermitage(A.Jackson's home) is quite small and he added on all his life. Monroe's and Madison's weren't that big either.
/ Oh, and any one of the 1% could buy the 13 states back then.


So far I've been to
-Washinton's Mt. Vernon
-both Adams houses in Quincy
-TJ's Monticello
-Madison's Montpelier
-Monroe's Ash Lawn-Highland
-FDR's Hyde Park

Pretty sure I'm forgetting one. Montpelier was actually fairly spacious, even before the duPonts doubled it. It was interesting to see the restorations in progress, but I should go back now that they're done.

Anyhow, yes, the 1% thing was my attempt at snark.
 
2013-10-24 11:11:50 PM

brimed03: tinfoil-hat maggie: brimed03: He was also terrible at personal finance. Bankrupted the family several times, IIRC. Also, Monticello is beautiful but the main house is a whole lot smaller than I expected.

/wonder how many other of the Founding Fathers would not have been in the 1%

You, should visit some more ex-Presidents houses. Hermitage(A.Jackson's home) is quite small and he added on all his life. Monroe's and Madison's weren't that big either.
/ Oh, and any one of the 1% could buy the 13 states back then.

So far I've been to
-Washinton's Mt. Vernon
-both Adams houses in Quincy
-TJ's Monticello
-Madison's Montpelier
-Monroe's Ash Lawn-Highland
-FDR's Hyde Park

Pretty sure I'm forgetting one. Montpelier was actually fairly spacious, even before the duPonts doubled it. It was interesting to see the restorations in progress, but I should go back now that they're done.

Anyhow, yes, the 1% thing was my attempt at snark.


I'd like to visit obama's boyhood home, but I don't have a passport.
 
2013-10-24 11:14:13 PM

nickdaisy: brimed03: tinfoil-hat maggie: brimed03: He was also terrible at personal finance. Bankrupted the family several times, IIRC. Also, Monticello is beautiful but the main house is a whole lot smaller than I expected.

/wonder how many other of the Founding Fathers would not have been in the 1%

You, should visit some more ex-Presidents houses. Hermitage(A.Jackson's home) is quite small and he added on all his life. Monroe's and Madison's weren't that big either.
/ Oh, and any one of the 1% could buy the 13 states back then.

So far I've been to
-Washinton's Mt. Vernon
-both Adams houses in Quincy
-TJ's Monticello
-Madison's Montpelier
-Monroe's Ash Lawn-Highland
-FDR's Hyde Park

Pretty sure I'm forgetting one. Montpelier was actually fairly spacious, even before the duPonts doubled it. It was interesting to see the restorations in progress, but I should go back now that they're done.

Anyhow, yes, the 1% thing was my attempt at snark.

I'd like to visit obama's boyhood home, but I don't have a passport.


Aren't you hilarious.

/old joke is old. And stale.
 
2013-10-24 11:16:52 PM

cptjeff: In terms of Jefferson, Jefferson's failures as a farmer and failures at personal fiance were, shall we say, somewhat related.


I'm not sure what his lack of a fiancé had to do with farming, but it didn't help to be down with OPP or have jungle fever.
 
2013-10-24 11:18:40 PM

tuna fingers: cptjeff: cptjeff: John Adams was not anywhere near well off.

I english gud tonight.

Ummm...  why did you highlight that single word and question it?
I really don't understand.


I forgot to add the word in my original post. A FTFM type thing, highlighting the part that was changed. And mocking myself for not being able to write.

\Wine may have been involved.
\\Incidentally, another farming project of Jefferson's that he sucked at.
 
2013-10-24 11:19:40 PM

gerbilpox: cptjeff: In terms of Jefferson, Jefferson's failures as a farmer and failures at personal fiance were, shall we say, somewhat related.

I'm not sure what his lack of a fiancé had to do with farming, but it didn't help to be down with OPP or have jungle fever.


I. ENGRISH. GUD.
 
2013-10-24 11:20:42 PM

brimed03: tinfoil-hat maggie: brimed03: He was also terrible at personal finance. Bankrupted the family several times, IIRC. Also, Monticello is beautiful but the main house is a whole lot smaller than I expected.

/wonder how many other of the Founding Fathers would not have been in the 1%

You, should visit some more ex-Presidents houses. Hermitage(A.Jackson's home) is quite small and he added on all his life. Monroe's and Madison's weren't that big either.
/ Oh, and any one of the 1% could buy the 13 states back then.

So far I've been to
-Washinton's Mt. Vernon
-both Adams houses in Quincy
-TJ's Monticello
-Madison's Montpelier
-Monroe's Ash Lawn-Highland
-FDR's Hyde Park

Pretty sure I'm forgetting one. Montpelier was actually fairly spacious, even before the duPonts doubled it. It was interesting to see the restorations in progress, but I should go back now that they're done.

Anyhow, yes, the 1% thing was my attempt at snark.


Cool, and I know that was snark. No worries.
 
2013-10-24 11:26:38 PM

brimed03: nickdaisy: I'd like to visit obama's boyhood home, but I don't have a passport.

Aren't you hilarious.


I chuckled, though I imagined it to be tongue-in-cheek. If it was meant seriously, it'd be idiotic...

... except that his boyhood home, ages 6-10, was in Indonesia, so regardless of his birthplace, it's technically correct.


/the best kind of correct
 
2013-10-24 11:29:17 PM

gerbilpox: brimed03: nickdaisy: I'd like to visit obama's boyhood home, but I don't have a passport.

Aren't you hilarious.

I chuckled, though I imagined it to be tongue-in-cheek. If it was meant seriously, it'd be idiotic...

... except that his boyhood home, ages 6-10, was in Indonesia, so regardless of his birthplace, it's technically correct.


/the best kind of correct


Who are you whackjobs?
 
2013-10-24 11:29:40 PM
This was partly due to his family being Welsh/English. The Germans were the superior race of farmers in colonial America.

"In settling a tract of land Germans always provide large barns for their horses and cattle, before they lay out much money in building a house for themselves. The first house is small and built of logs. It generally lasts through the lifetime of the first settler and hence, they have a saying, that a son should always begin his improvements, where his father left off. They always prefer good land, or that land on which there are great meadows.  By giving attention to the cultivation of grass, they often in a few years double the value of an old farm, and grow rich on farms, on which their predecessors, of whom they purchased them, had nearly starved. In clearing new land they do not simply girdle or belt the trees, and leave them to perish in the ground, as is the custom of their English or Irish neighbors; they generally cut them down and burn them. Underbrush and bushes they pull out by the roots. The advantage is that the land is fit for cultivation the second year. They feed livestock well, thereby practicing economy, for such animals perform twice the labor or yield twice the amount of the less well fed. The German farmers are also great wood-economists. They do not waste it in large fire-places, but burn it in stoves, using about one-fourth to one-fifth as much. Germans live frugally in regard to diet, furniture and dress.  They eat sparingly of boiled meat, but use large quantities of all kinds of vegetables.  They use few distilled spirits (whiskey and rum), preferring cider, beer, wine, and simple water.  In their homespun garments they are likewise economical. When they use European articles of dress, they prefer those of best quality and highest price.  They are afraid to get into debt, and seldom purchase anything without paying cash for it."
 
2013-10-24 11:38:30 PM

cyberspacedout: brimed03: He was also terrible at personal finance. Bankrupted the family several times, IIRC. Also, Monticello is beautiful but the main house is a whole lot smaller than I expected.

/wonder how many other of the Founding Fathers would not have been in the 1%

I've been told that his money problems were the reason he sold his entire ~6000 volume library to Congress, and that by the time he died, he had amassed another 6000.


It's pretty exciting, they're trying to rebuild his original donated library. 2/3 of it was destroyed in a fire, and they've gotten pretty far along in finding original replacements. It's a very cool display at the Library of Congress.

/in another life I'd have been the head of the LoC, aka the Librarian of Congress
//business card would simply be "the Librarian"
///not to be confused with the Noah Wyle series
 
2013-10-24 11:48:25 PM

Kevin72: The important thing is to try and try and try again and learn from your mistakes. Like the stories of Edison trying 10000 experiments for the lightbulb. Edison and Jefferson were not motivated by money, but by seeking a better way. I salute both.


Thomas Edison was absolutely motivated by money. Ask George Westinghouse about it.
 
2013-10-24 11:48:26 PM

The Pope of Manwich Village: This was partly due to his family being Welsh/English. The Germans were the superior race of farmers in colonial America.

"In settling a tract of land Germans always provide large barns for their horses and cattle, before they lay out much money in building a house for themselves. The first house is small and built of logs. It generally lasts through the lifetime of the first settler and hence, they have a saying, that a son should always begin his improvements, where his father left off. They always prefer good land, or that land on which there are great meadows.  By giving attention to the cultivation of grass, they often in a few years double the value of an old farm, and grow rich on farms, on which their predecessors, of whom they purchased them, had nearly starved. In clearing new land they do not simply girdle or belt the trees, and leave them to perish in the ground, as is the custom of their English or Irish neighbors; they generally cut them down and burn them. Underbrush and bushes they pull out by the roots. The advantage is that the land is fit for cultivation the second year. They feed livestock well, thereby practicing economy, for such animals perform twice the labor or yield twice the amount of the less well fed. The German farmers are also great wood-economists. They do not waste it in large fire-places, but burn it in stoves, using about one-fourth to one-fifth as much. Germans live frugally in regard to diet, furniture and dress.  They eat sparingly of boiled meat, but use large quantities of all kinds of vegetables.  They use few distilled spirits (whiskey and rum), preferring cider, beer, wine, and simple water.  In their homespun garments they are likewise economical. When they use European articles of dress, they prefer those of best quality and highest price.  They are afraid to get into debt, and seldom purchase anything without paying cash for it."


Interesting, sounds labor intensive but well we do speak English know : )
 
2013-10-24 11:48:42 PM

Kevin72: The important thing is to try and try and try again and learn from your mistakes. Like the stories of Edison trying 10000 experiments for the lightbulb. Edison and Jefferson were not motivated by money, but by seeking a better way. I salute both.


Trying to bag the Tesla supporters?
 
2013-10-24 11:53:39 PM

olddinosaur: I toured Monticello last summer, and whatever else you can say about the man, he was unquestionably a multi--talented genius.


I was thinking he had other crops succeeding all the while we were picking over the failures.
 
2013-10-24 11:53:53 PM
For Jefferson, farming was perhaps the foremost means for social change.

Yeah, how'd that work out for the slaves picking cotton?
 
2013-10-24 11:56:11 PM

The Pope of Manwich Village: This was partly due to his family being Welsh/English. The Germans were the superior race of farmers in colonial America.

"In settling a tract of land Germans always provide large barns for their horses and cattle, before they lay out much money in building a house for themselves. The first house is small and built of logs. It generally lasts through the lifetime of the first settler and hence, they have a saying, that a son should always begin his improvements, where his father left off. They always prefer good land, or that land on which there are great meadows.  By giving attention to the cultivation of grass, they often in a few years double the value of an old farm, and grow rich on farms, on which their predecessors, of whom they purchased them, had nearly starved. In clearing new land they do not simply girdle or belt the trees, and leave them to perish in the ground, as is the custom of their English or Irish neighbors; they generally cut them down and burn them. Underbrush and bushes they pull out by the roots. The advantage is that the land is fit for cultivation the second year. They feed livestock well, thereby practicing economy, for such animals perform twice the labor or yield twice the amount of the less well fed. The German farmers are also great wood-economists. They do not waste it in large fire-places, but burn it in stoves, using about one-fourth to one-fifth as much. Germans live frugally in regard to diet, furniture and dress.  They eat sparingly of boiled meat, but use large quantities of all kinds of vegetables.  They use few distilled spirits (whiskey and rum), preferring cider, beer, wine, and simple water.  In their homespun garments they are likewise economical. When they use European articles of dress, they prefer those of best quality and highest price.  They are afraid to get into debt, and seldom purchase anything without paying cash for it."


That's racist. I'm a European-American of distant Germanic/Hungarian origin and I am highly offended by your quote stereotyping my people.

P.S. I don't drink liquor (but a lot of beer), I'm stingy with my wood, I spend extra money for durable clothing, I don't have any debt, and I have made some tidy profits growing "grass." But that doesn't make racism okay!
 
2013-10-24 11:58:01 PM

The Pope of Manwich Village: This was partly due to his family being Welsh/English. The Germans were the superior race of farmers in colonial America.

"In settling a tract of land Germans always provide large barns for their horses and cattle, before they lay out much money in building a house for themselves. The first house is small and built of logs. It generally lasts through the lifetime of the first settler and hence, they have a saying, that a son should always begin his improvements, where his father left off. They always prefer good land, or that land on which there are great meadows.  By giving attention to the cultivation of grass, they often in a few years double the value of an old farm, and grow rich on farms, on which their predecessors, of whom they purchased them, had nearly starved. In clearing new land they do not simply girdle or belt the trees, and leave them to perish in the ground, as is the custom of their English or Irish neighbors; they generally cut them down and burn them. Underbrush and bushes they pull out by the roots. The advantage is that the land is fit for cultivation the second year. They feed livestock well, thereby practicing economy, for such animals perform twice the labor or yield twice the amount of the less well fed. The German farmers are also great wood-economists. They do not waste it in large fire-places, but burn it in stoves, using about one-fourth to one-fifth as much. Germans live frugally in regard to diet, furniture and dress.  They eat sparingly of boiled meat, but use large quantities of all kinds of vegetables.  They use few distilled spirits (whiskey and rum), preferring cider, beer, wine, and simple water.  In their homespun garments they are likewise economical. When they use European articles of dress, they prefer those of best quality and highest price.  They are afraid to get into debt, and seldom purchase anything without paying cash for it."


Cool. Who are you quoting?
 
2013-10-25 12:03:12 AM

Wake Up Sheeple: Kevin72: The important thing is to try and try and try again and learn from your mistakes. Like the stories of Edison trying 10000 experiments for the lightbulb. Edison and Jefferson were not motivated by money, but by seeking a better way. I salute both.

Trying to bag the Tesla supporters?


Society remembers the CEOs.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelhumphrey/2011/10/14/the-inevitable - steve-jobs-vs-dennis-ritchie-discussion/
 
2013-10-25 12:08:24 AM

Delawheredad: One of the most productive of Jefferson's ventures was making nails He had slaves make nails for him



Sorry, I read that at first as "nailing slaves".
 
2013-10-25 12:10:24 AM

Urmuf Hamer: The Pope of Manwich Village: This was partly due to his family being Welsh/English. The Germans were the superior race of farmers in colonial America.

"In settling a tract of land Germans always provide large barns for their horses and cattle, before they lay out much money in building a house for themselves. The first house is small and built of logs. It generally lasts through the lifetime of the first settler and hence, they have a saying, that a son should always begin his improvements, where his father left off. They always prefer good land, or that land on which there are great meadows.  By giving attention to the cultivation of grass, they often in a few years double the value of an old farm, and grow rich on farms, on which their predecessors, of whom they purchased them, had nearly starved. In clearing new land they do not simply girdle or belt the trees, and leave them to perish in the ground, as is the custom of their English or Irish neighbors; they generally cut them down and burn them. Underbrush and bushes they pull out by the roots. The advantage is that the land is fit for cultivation the second year. They feed livestock well, thereby practicing economy, for such animals perform twice the labor or yield twice the amount of the less well fed. The German farmers are also great wood-economists. They do not waste it in large fire-places, but burn it in stoves, using about one-fourth to one-fifth as much. Germans live frugally in regard to diet, furniture and dress.  They eat sparingly of boiled meat, but use large quantities of all kinds of vegetables.  They use few distilled spirits (whiskey and rum), preferring cider, beer, wine, and simple water.  In their homespun garments they are likewise economical. When they use European articles of dress, they prefer those of best quality and highest price.  They are afraid to get into debt, and seldom purchase anything without paying cash for it."

Cool. Who are you quoting?


Dr. Benjamin Rush, Surgeon General during The Revolution, spoke after passing through all the colonies.  In 1789 he published "An Account of the Manners of the German Inhabitants of Pennsylvania."
 
2013-10-25 12:12:29 AM

Wake Up Sheeple: Kevin72: The important thing is to try and try and try again and learn from your mistakes. Like the stories of Edison trying 10000 experiments for the lightbulb. Edison and Jefferson were not motivated by money, but by seeking a better way. I salute both.

Trying to bag the Tesla supporters?


Tesla got his inventions from Cosmic Consciousness, or from the Pleadians, or somesuch similar source. He is in a category categorically different from Jefferson and Edison.
 
2013-10-25 12:12:34 AM

Wake Up Sheeple: Kevin72: The important thing is to try and try and try again and learn from your mistakes. Like the stories of Edison trying 10000 experiments for the lightbulb. Edison and Jefferson were not motivated by money, but by seeking a better way. I salute both.

Trying to bag the Tesla supporters?


My god, he invented a jock strap as well as AC power?
 
2013-10-25 12:14:11 AM

brimed03: He was also terrible at personal finance. Bankrupted the family several times, IIRC. Also, Monticello is beautiful but the main house is a whole lot smaller than I expected.

/wonder how many other of the Founding Fathers would not have been in the 1%


//wonders how many of the 99% had the means and will to revolt
 
2013-10-25 12:17:02 AM

The Pope of Manwich Village: Urmuf Hamer:


(long quote about German Superiority)

Cool. Who are you quoting?

Dr. Benjamin Rush


Oh phew... I wasn't going to ask.
 
2013-10-25 12:17:22 AM
comedycentral.mtvnimages.com
 
2013-10-25 12:29:05 AM

Wake Up Sheeple: Kevin72: The important thing is to try and try and try again and learn from your mistakes. Like the stories of Edison trying 10000 experiments for the lightbulb. Edison and Jefferson were not motivated by money, but by seeking a better way. I salute both.

Trying to bag the Tesla supporters?


Edison was a dick towards Tesla. I saw a Modern Marvels show about it and I just searched Wikipedia to make sure I was correct about my recollection of that fact:

In 1885, Tesla claimed that he could redesign Edison's inefficient motor and generators, making an improvement in both service and economy. According to Tesla, Edison remarked, "There's fifty thousand dollars in it for you-if you can do it"[43]-this has been noted as an odd statement from an Edison whose company was stingy with pay and who did not have that sort of cash on hand.[44] After months of work, Tesla fulfilled the task and inquired about payment. Edison, claiming that he was only joking, replied, "Tesla, you don't understand our American humor."[45][46] Instead, Edison offered a US$10 a week raise over Tesla's US$18 per week salary; Tesla refused the offer and immediately resigned.[43]

/Sorry, my first attempt at copy/paste here in Fark
//Probably looks like shiat. Again, sorry
 
2013-10-25 12:41:17 AM

brimed03: cyberspacedout: brimed03: He was also terrible at personal finance. Bankrupted the family several times, IIRC. Also, Monticello is beautiful but the main house is a whole lot smaller than I expected.

/wonder how many other of the Founding Fathers would not have been in the 1%

I've been told that his money problems were the reason he sold his entire ~6000 volume library to Congress, and that by the time he died, he had amassed another 6000.

It's pretty exciting, they're trying to rebuild his original donated library. 2/3 of it was destroyed in a fire, and they've gotten pretty far along in finding original replacements. It's a very cool display at the Library of Congress.

/in another life I'd have been the head of the LoC, aka the Librarian of Congress
//business card would simply be "the Librarian"
///not to be confused with the Noah Wyle series


Geeze, how many times has the library of Congress burned?

 Is this a normal thing for old libraries?
 
Displayed 50 of 68 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report