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(Food Network)   Fark Food Thread: You knew it was going to happen. It's closing in on that time of year so show us all why your way to do a turkey for the meal festivities is the right way. Yes, we're judging you.. But really, everyone wins   (foodnetwork.com) divider line 180
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907 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Oct 2013 at 5:00 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-24 02:42:14 PM
I've never had deep fried turkey but I really want to try it.
 
2013-10-24 02:43:40 PM
Last year, I had a can of soup for Thanksgiving dinner.
 
2013-10-24 02:44:05 PM
Brine your turkey then smoke it, then eat it.
 
2013-10-24 02:46:47 PM
I hate turkey so last year we got a mess of fajita stuff and a tradition was born.
 
2013-10-24 02:47:45 PM
A few years ago I layed shingles of bacon over the turkey and then basted with maple syrup.

It was good, but it's turkey, so you can only do so much with it.
 
2013-10-24 02:49:46 PM
I slow roast my turkey with a special marinade over it. Along with it I make: fresh green bean casserole, Nordic potato salad, cheesy hashbrown casserole, zucchini cheddar puff, mashed sweet potatoes, apple/cranberry pie and pumpkin pie.
 
2013-10-24 02:49:55 PM
First you warm the crucible up to 2500 degrees or so, then you start adding iron and scrap steel, some carbon, some nickel and some manganese

While that's melting you prep your mold by heating it up with a torch, this has the effect of causing oil binder in the dirt to burn off, hardening the mold and eliminating any gas from the oil when you pour.  Also a hot mold means the steel stays liquid longer, so you have fewer pockets in your metal
 
2013-10-24 02:51:06 PM
us.123rf.com
 
2013-10-24 02:54:28 PM
I have a big family and most of them are married and do Thanksgiving lunch one place and dinner another, a couple of them had Friday meals, too.  So at my house we had lasagna with salad, garlic bread, some spinach and other goodies.  It was delicious.

I would like to do that again this year if I can talk the rest of the family into it.
 
2013-10-24 02:57:47 PM

Kyro: [us.123rf.com image 400x600]


Are pizza joints open on Thanksgiving day?
 
2013-10-24 02:58:48 PM

Smeggy Smurf: Brine your turkey then smoke it, then eat it.


Yep...
scontent-a.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2013-10-24 02:59:13 PM

atlfarkette: Kyro: [us.123rf.com image 400x600]

Are pizza joints open on Thanksgiving day?


Yup.
 
2013-10-24 03:01:30 PM

Kyro: atlfarkette: Kyro: [us.123rf.com image 400x600]

Are pizza joints open on Thanksgiving day?

Yup.


Huh. I did not know that.
 
2013-10-24 03:03:11 PM

Smeggy Smurf: Brine your turkey then smoke it, then eat it.


I did that one year and it turned out wonderful. Took about 6 hours for a ~12 lb turkey.
 
2013-10-24 03:04:18 PM
Honey brine a 20lb turkey and smoke it.
 
2013-10-24 03:04:42 PM
Do a turkey?

i.imgur.com
 
2013-10-24 03:05:04 PM
We do turkey the right way by having prime rib.
 
2013-10-24 03:07:28 PM

monty666: Do a turkey?

[i.imgur.com image 183x275]


Did you see that they're coming out with a cartoon movie about turkeys trying to escape the turkey farm just in time for Thanksgiving? Yeah......
 
2013-10-24 03:13:28 PM
I'm not allowed anywhere near the turkey.  Mr. Mez has a Christmas Story-like obsession with holiday turkey and insists on doing the roasting himself. He brines, roasts it breast down in a bag, and finishes it rightside up to brown.  He also injects it with seasoned lime butter
 
2013-10-24 03:15:43 PM
I make the turkey and potato casserole, the rest of the family does everything else. With as many as twenty people I don't always go all out Martha Stewart on it. My wife's side isn't really into that stuff anyway. For example, a smoked ham on the bone isn't appreciated. They grew up on the deli style ham heated up. At least it wasn't canned. The one year I made the cranberries from scratch didn't go over that well and they like the jello in a can. Meh. So fine. I just lean generic now. At least the homemade cornbread stuffing with smoked sausage is a permanent staple. My BIL suddenly started getting into food once he turned forty and my new BIL is a foodie with a lot of talent, so hopefully we'll be slowly taking over the day and having really good food.

So basically get the biggest Butterball you can and follow the label. Just have some wine, watch football and worry about good homemade stuff the rest of the year.
 
2013-10-24 03:20:44 PM

atlfarkette: Huh. I did not know that.


It's actually one of their busiest days of the year. A lot of families eat early in the afternoon and once all the teen-twenty something kids get home they're hungry again and order out.

/friend has two Marcos franchises
 
2013-10-24 03:47:24 PM
www.x-entertainment.com

dump.gayadesign.nl
 
2013-10-24 03:47:57 PM
Brineing is the only way to go. Brine 4 to 6 hours in a mix of 1 cup kosher salt, 1 cup brown sugar or honey to a gallon of water. Make enough to cover the bird completely. Add 3 tsp pickling spices, and some bay leaves. Bring the mix up to 160 degrees (sugar breaks down any hotter) and let cook for 1/2 hour. It can be made in small batches if you don't have a big pot. 4 gallons is about right for a 13 lb bird. Allow it to cool to room temperature and then soak the bird. The longer the saltier. An ice chest works well for a soaking container.

You can cook the bird in the oven (350 for about 2 hours), a Weber, using the indirect method (hour and a half), or in a smoker. whichever method you use bring the breast meat to just above 140 degrees (use a push in cook's thermometer). The legs and wings cook faster and will burn if you get it any hotter.

Prior to cooking rub the bird down with any kind of cooking oil and spread crushed raw garlic, pepper and paprika over the top. Very Important: After cooking let the bird "rest" for a half hour to an hour at room temperature prior to carving. The bird will self cook and firm up during this time.

I almost always use the BBQ. Charcoal not gas. Its fast and easy and frees up the stove for other dishes. The brine is the key. It really soaks in and turns the meat a light pink color. It locks the water into the bird and leaves it moist. Do not add salt after cooking as the brine is quite salty. I prefer an olive oil rub and fresh, not frozen, turkey.

After the usual Friday leftovers we put the dregs in a low oven and make jerky for the dogs.

Enjoy.
 
2013-10-24 03:50:42 PM
I like what my brother calls "White Trash Turkey":  You take a turkey, slather it in mayonnaise, then put it
in a brown paper grocery bag stapled shut.

The stuff is so juicy and flavourful, and yet the bird doesn't fall apart like it does if you cook it in one of those
plastic oven baster bags..
 
2013-10-24 03:52:53 PM
I mix herbs and spices with butter, then loosen the skin and put the mixture underneath it. It turns out beautiful.
 
2013-10-24 03:53:31 PM
www.peta.org
 
2013-10-24 03:58:13 PM

ferretman: [www.peta.org image 600x465]


doesn't that violate truth in labeling laws?
 
2013-10-24 04:05:06 PM
 
2013-10-24 04:06:55 PM
Tent, don't steam.
 
2013-10-24 04:11:31 PM

atlfarkette: I've never had deep fried turkey but I really want to try it.


Every year I try to catch the "Don't kill yourself while frying a turkey" thread to post cooking tips and instructions.

I cook anywhere between 7-12 a year (often do a couple during the year).  My typical method using a 36 quart pot is for any turkey 15lbs and under in package should go *at least* 3 1/2 minutes a pound at 325-350 using peanut oil or cottonseed oil.  Just have a good meat thermometer.  Stop when both the thick breast and leg break 160 (anything not cooked will finish up will sitting).  Make sure it is *completely* thawed if you want it to cook evenly (of course).

There's much more detail but the thing to remember when looking from frying recipe to frying recipe is to note the size of the turkey they use and the region.  For Houston at Thanksgiving, we can sometimes wear shorts outside.  325-350 works great (and I go closer to 325) for anything from 10-15 pounds.
 
2013-10-24 04:12:11 PM
Twenty pound bird. Two hours. Orion Cooker.  Smokey awesome...

farm3.staticflickr.com

www.bbqsaucereviews.com
 
2013-10-24 04:31:58 PM

loonatic112358: ferretman: [www.peta.org image 600x465]

doesn't that violate truth in labeling laws?


essentialsurvival.orgdailydropcap.comfc07.deviantart.netwww.rfta.com
 
2013-10-24 04:34:23 PM
 
2013-10-24 04:34:54 PM

Smeggy Smurf: Brine your turkey then smoke it, then eat it.


I see things are wrapped up here, on to another thread
 
2013-10-24 05:03:21 PM
Thanksgiving was a couple weeks ago.
 
2013-10-24 05:06:57 PM
media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com

/obligatory.
 
2013-10-24 05:06:59 PM
Orange Bourbon Turkey   http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/cooking-live/orange-bourbon-turkey - recipe/index.html#!

If you change the bourbon to Jameson 12 year old it is SOOOOOOOOO much better and drap it with bacon about half way through the roasting process. IT IS SO AWESOME!
 
2013-10-24 05:08:01 PM
And then get some deep fried bacon wrapped cheesecake bites dipped in more Jameson after cooking.

AWESOMENESS!
 
2013-10-24 05:08:28 PM
Thanksgiving is over, so I have no idea what's going on. However, I have two words for you:

BACON LATTICE

My Sis made a bird in the oven this year, but half-way through cooking, she whipped out a huge lattice of raw bacon, it was beautiful. She slapped it over the bird like a sweet-meat blankey. After that was added, she began to baste the bird with the bacon/bird drippings. Best. Turkey. EVAR.
 
2013-10-24 05:08:39 PM
Is it possible to do a bacon wrapped bacon stuffed deep fried turkey?
 
2013-10-24 05:09:02 PM

loonatic112358: First you warm the crucible up to 2500 degrees or so, then you start adding iron and scrap steel, some carbon, some nickel and some manganese

While that's melting you prep your mold by heating it up with a torch, this has the effect of causing oil binder in the dirt to burn off, hardening the mold and eliminating any gas from the oil when you pour.  Also a hot mold means the steel stays liquid longer, so you have fewer pockets in your metal


Is this your turkey?
 
2013-10-24 05:09:22 PM
If there are only 2 of you and you don't want leftovers for weeks, this recipe is fantastic. It is easy and straightforward and delicious! If you have fear of dry turkey breast, feel free to brine it first, although I haven't had that problem yet. I've made this 3 times.
 
2013-10-24 05:09:40 PM
s14.postimg.org
 
2013-10-24 05:09:41 PM

Russ1642: Thanksgiving was a couple weeks ago.


That one doesn't count
 
2013-10-24 05:10:18 PM

atlfarkette: I've never had deep fried turkey but I really want to try it.


deep fried a turkey once... now, here are some key steps, make sure it is thawed.  take fire precaution seriously... and don't overcook it. it cooks a lot faster.

I think deep fried turkey is the ideal preparation (having eaten it prepared by people who know what they're doing), but when I did it, i farked it up.  had a roommate that bought the biggest turkey in the free world, and it was just a mess.  overcooked the outside meat, barely cooked the inside meat.  and dry turkey is poison.

but, it had great flavor, just needed a mechanical jaw to chew it.

so, i would also say, don't get a huge ass turkey, they taste worse, their meat is worse, and they cook poorly.

the small turkey applies to all turkeys and all fowl for all cooking methods.

/ other method is to cut the turkey in half, and cook the halves.  this is probably best. if not frying, the bird cooks much more evenly and it is much easier to keep it from overcooking parts.
 
2013-10-24 05:10:22 PM

Spatchcocking.


http://www.austinchronicle.com/food/2006-11-17/421132/




i946.photobucket.com

i946.photobucket.com
Moist bird done in record time instead of hours.
 
2013-10-24 05:11:01 PM

missmez: I'm not allowed anywhere near the turkey.  Mr. Mez has a Christmas Story-like obsession with holiday turkey and insists on doing the roasting himself. He brines, roasts it breast down in a bag, and finishes it rightside up to brown.  He also injects it with seasoned lime butter


That's how I do it, without injecting though. I also stuff it with homemade stuffing which helps keep it moist.
 
2013-10-24 05:11:03 PM

Spoon over Marin: I hate turkey so last year we got a mess of fajita stuff and a tradition was born.


I'm not a big fan of roast turkey, either.

I wouldn't mind trying a fried one, how bad could it be, but nobody in my family has attempted it yet. Probably just as well. Don't want to end up on Fark as part of a "family burns down home while frying turkey" story.
 
2013-10-24 05:11:43 PM
Turkey breast in Cabernet Sauvignon overnight in a slow cooker. I was skeptical, thinking the meat would be stained reddish, but my GF insisted~ no stain, she was right; bird was delicious.
 
2013-10-24 05:12:27 PM
I'm sure we all have varying methods for cooking one, but the thing we can all agree on: you should get the bird live and kill it by punching it to death.
 
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