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(NBC DFW)   Sad trombone: You're a cop on a police raid that doesn't uncover any illegal drugs. Happy horn: But there *are* a pair of pricey Air Jordans in the house   (nbcdfw.com) divider line 54
    More: Dumbass, Jordan shoes, police raid, illegal drug, police officers, au pairs  
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5935 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Oct 2013 at 3:59 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



54 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-10-23 04:01:23 PM  
Police reported finding $1,060 in the raid, but Green said he had closer to $3,000.

Don't worry, you'll get your $200 back soon.
 
2013-10-23 04:01:34 PM  
A pair of fresh Jordan's will make a man do terrible things....terrible things.
 
2013-10-23 04:03:45 PM  
hide your jordans in books
 
2013-10-23 04:05:26 PM  
Sad Trombone according to urban dictionary:

A sex move that is similar to the 'rusty trombone' (licking a man's butthole while giving him a reach around), only with both people crying. Usually occurs post-breakup.
 
2013-10-23 04:05:30 PM  
I think it's less relevant that he's a cop, and more relevant that he's black.

files.gamebanana.com

/plz to not be banned
 
2013-10-23 04:05:52 PM  
I have little to no sympathy for a guy who would just keep $3,000 in his house unsecured.  You can buy a safe for about 1/4 the cost of a pair of Air Jordans.
 
2013-10-23 04:06:39 PM  
Sounds like this cop made some enemies on the force.  Or, more likely, internal affairs.

No blue curtain for you!
 
2013-10-23 04:06:54 PM  

DarkSoulNoHope: Police reported finding $1,060 in the raid, but Green said he had closer to $3,000.

Don't worry, you'll get your $200 back soon.


What's the point of even returning that $100 if you have to file an expensive case against them?
 
2013-10-23 04:08:26 PM  
 
2013-10-23 04:09:38 PM  

rkiller1: WTF???
http://www.ebay.com/sch/Mens-Shoes-/93427/i.html?_from=R40&_dmd=1&_s op =16&_ipg=25&_nkw=air+jordan


I thought it was a joke, till this:
http://www.ebay.com/sch/Mens-Shoes-/93427/i.html?_from=R40&_dmd=1&_s op =16&_ipg=25&_nkw=air+jordan&LH_Complete=1&LH_Sold=1&rt=nc
 
2013-10-23 04:09:50 PM  
"They is the bad guys, really,"

Assuming I start talking like that, I may come into some hard cash. I am sure the price for that is to be pulled over for no reason, and to get my property stolen by my "protectors". Real sweet deal.
 
2013-10-23 04:10:21 PM  
Police reported finding $1,060 in the raid, but Green said he had closer to $3,000.

Should have gone bigger once he saw they stole stuff from him.

/prob legit.
 
2013-10-23 04:11:30 PM  
According to court documents, two officers tipped off the department that Williams, who was in charge of the drug raid, kept the pricey shoes.

I come to the conclusion that this guy wasn't popular, or IA had it in for him and threatened the other cops to make them rat him out.
 
2013-10-23 04:13:31 PM  
"Police reported finding $1,060 in the raid, but Green said he had closer to $3,000."

Hell why not shoot for a cool million. Yes officers I had closer to $1M...
 
2013-10-23 04:14:42 PM  
What kills me about stuff like this, it's just so low-rent.

Planting evidence for a $100,000 payoff?  I could see that.  I wouldn't condone it, but I could understand it.

Ruining your career over SNEAKERS?

It's like that admiral they caught with $1500 in fake casino chips...classless loser.

Can't even do PETTY crime right, ffs.
 
2013-10-23 04:14:43 PM  
Cops don't get paid a salary anyway, how else are they expected to make a living?

Wait, what?
 
2013-10-23 04:15:57 PM  
One beautiful and successful thieving cop + one beautful and successful individual with thousands of dollars in cash to "rent an apartment" = no winners.
 
2013-10-23 04:22:39 PM  
I don't get this.  I've been a cop for awhile now, and have been a member of a SWAT team doing warrant services similar to this for years.  In that time I've come across big-time dealers with hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash, jewelry, cars, electronics, weapons, etc.  Not a single time have I ever been willing to risk my career, my livelihood or my retirement for any of it.

It's simply not worth it.  Even if these Jordan's were the $10,000 collectors type, it's still not worth it.

Furthermore, now it doesn't matter what the family says is missing, there's a thief who was in their house.  Do I believe at all that the guy had $3,000 that is now missing?  I do not, not for a second.  Will the family get $3,000 now? Yes.

This guy is pathetic, and he threw away his career for a few hundred bucks, at most a couple thousand.

Good work to the guys on his agency who turned him in, though.  Those guys should be commended.
 
2013-10-23 04:29:29 PM  

Dirtybird971: Police reported finding $1,060 in the raid, but Green said he had closer to $3,000.

Should have gone bigger once he saw they stole stuff from him.

/prob legit.


Going bigger lends itself to the question as to why he had that much cash laying around.  The "apartment" excuse is thin as it is - that's why people have a bank account.

/I believe the guy.
 
US1
2013-10-23 04:30:17 PM  

HideAndGoFarkYourself: I don't get this.  I've been a cop for awhile now, and have been a member of a SWAT team doing warrant services similar to this for years.  In that time I've come across big-time dealers with hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash, jewelry, cars, electronics, weapons, etc.  Not a single time have I ever been willing to risk my career, my livelihood or my retirement for any of it.

It's simply not worth it.  Even if these Jordan's were the $10,000 collectors type, it's still not worth it.

Furthermore, now it doesn't matter what the family says is missing, there's a thief who was in their house.  Do I believe at all that the guy had $3,000 that is now missing?  I do not, not for a second.  Will the family get $3,000 now? Yes.

This guy is pathetic, and he threw away his career for a few hundred bucks, at most a couple thousand.

Good work to the guys on his agency who turned him in, though.  Those guys should be commended.


Wow a fellow officer that is calling a spade a spade. Color me surprised!
 
2013-10-23 04:30:28 PM  
Williams remains on restricted duty at the police department, which means he cannot carry a gun or badge.

I'm sure someone caught stealing from cops would be able to go home every night, keep his/her job and draw a nice salary too.

Fark every last cop. I hope every single one gets ass cancer.
 
2013-10-23 04:31:23 PM  
FTFA: "We looked at the window ... and police was everywhere, and they had the big old shotguns," Tanya Stephenson said.

Yep.
 
2013-10-23 04:34:55 PM  

baronbloodbath: I have little to no sympathy for a guy who would just keep $3,000 in his house unsecured.  You can buy a safe for about 1/4 the cost of a pair of Air Jordans.


I'd probably want a safe myself against regular thieves, but I doubt a safe would help if cops wanted to steal from you. It's not like they're impossible to open, and if they have a drug warrant they can easily say that it covers searching the safe. So he'd have to give up the combo or they'd just cut it open.
 
2013-10-23 04:38:32 PM  

HideAndGoFarkYourself: I don't get this.  I've been a cop for awhile now, and have been a member of a SWAT team doing warrant services similar to this for years.  In that time I've come across big-time dealers with hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash, jewelry, cars, electronics, weapons, etc.  Not a single time have I ever been willing to risk my career, my livelihood or my retirement for any of it.

It's simply not worth it.  Even if these Jordan's were the $10,000 collectors type, it's still not worth it.

Furthermore, now it doesn't matter what the family says is missing, there's a thief who was in their house.  Do I believe at all that the guy had $3,000 that is now missing?  I do not, not for a second.  Will the family get $3,000 now? Yes.

This guy is pathetic, and he threw away his career for a few hundred bucks, at most a couple thousand.

Good work to the guys on his agency who turned him in, though.  Those guys should be commended.


I agree - with the exception that you don't believe the guy's story about the missing cash.  As an officer of the law, if the story were reversed, would you feel the same way?  I mean, all law enforcement officers are programmed to assume guilt - especially once one level of guilt has been established.  Given that, once the officer had been proven to have stolen the shoes, why would you doubt the guy's story that money had been taken as well?
 
2013-10-23 04:39:33 PM  

megarian: DarkSoulNoHope: Police reported finding $1,060 in the raid, but Green said he had closer to $3,000.

Don't worry, you'll get your $200 back soon.

What's the point of even returning that $100 if you have to file an expensive case against them?


Exactly, I don't see him ever getting that $50 back.
 
2013-10-23 04:43:16 PM  

megarian: DarkSoulNoHope: Police reported finding $1,060 in the raid, but Green said he had closer to $3,000.

Don't worry, you'll get your $200 back soon.

What's the point of even returning that $100 if you have to file an expensive case against them?

the police called, they are very sorry. they will drop off your converse all-stars with your fiver tucked in later.
consider yourself protected AND served!

 
2013-10-23 04:44:31 PM  

US1: HideAndGoFarkYourself: I don't get this.  I've been a cop for awhile now, and have been a member of a SWAT team doing warrant services similar to this for years.  In that time I've come across big-time dealers with hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash, jewelry, cars, electronics, weapons, etc.  Not a single time have I ever been willing to risk my career, my livelihood or my retirement for any of it.

It's simply not worth it.  Even if these Jordan's were the $10,000 collectors type, it's still not worth it.

Furthermore, now it doesn't matter what the family says is missing, there's a thief who was in their house.  Do I believe at all that the guy had $3,000 that is now missing?  I do not, not for a second.  Will the family get $3,000 now? Yes.

This guy is pathetic, and he threw away his career for a few hundred bucks, at most a couple thousand.

Good work to the guys on his agency who turned him in, though.  Those guys should be commended.

Wow a fellow officer that is calling a spade a spade. Color me surprised!


It happens more than you think, to be honest.  I've arrested my fair share of police officers in my career, some of them were excellent cops, but my oath doesn't say anything about turning a blind eye to certain people simply because of what they do for a living.  In fact, our last SWAT warrant service was on a cop's house.

Cops are arrested a lot, and every time it happens, it's by another police officer.  That being said, I'm willing to bet this was not this officer's first theft on a warrant service.

Have my co-workers stolen things, or otherwise committed crimes while working?  I'm sure they have.  Do I know for certain? Nope.  If I did, I'd do exactly as these officers did, and turn them in.

There is A LOT of temptation in this job.  The natural by-product of dealing with criminals everyday is that the word of a criminal is given less weight than a police officers.  A guy walks into a police department after being arrested with a bunch of dope, or guns, and says "hey man, those cops took $500 out of my car" and most agencies aren't going to believe it.  So it becomes easy for an officer, especially a narcotics officer, to go into a house of a drug dealer, see cash stashed all over the place, and slide a few bills into his pocket.  You know...you buy his wife a nice present, or his kids school clothes, or get himself a new watch, whatever it may be.

This guy (and those like him) is a disgrace to the profession, and to the hundreds of thousands of honest, hardworking, decent law enforcement officers in the country.
 
2013-10-23 04:45:05 PM  
"They didn't find no drugs in the house at all," he said. "They just took shoes that I ain't never wore."

Quite.
 
2013-10-23 04:45:34 PM  

vento: HideAndGoFarkYourself: I don't get this.  I've been a cop for awhile now, and have been a member of a SWAT team doing warrant services similar to this for years.  In that time I've come across big-time dealers with hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash, jewelry, cars, electronics, weapons, etc.  Not a single time have I ever been willing to risk my career, my livelihood or my retirement for any of it.

It's simply not worth it.  Even if these Jordan's were the $10,000 collectors type, it's still not worth it.

Furthermore, now it doesn't matter what the family says is missing, there's a thief who was in their house.  Do I believe at all that the guy had $3,000 that is now missing?  I do not, not for a second.  Will the family get $3,000 now? Yes.

This guy is pathetic, and he threw away his career for a few hundred bucks, at most a couple thousand.

Good work to the guys on his agency who turned him in, though.  Those guys should be commended.

I agree - with the exception that you don't believe the guy's story about the missing cash.  As an officer of the law, if the story were reversed, would you feel the same way?  I mean, all law enforcement officers are programmed to assume guilt - especially once one level of guilt has been established.  Given that, once the officer had been proven to have stolen the shoes, why would you doubt the guy's story that money had been taken as well?


Yup, that's it. Not that the guy can't be lying, but the problem here is that he has credibility now. He said they took his shoes and it was true, the cop took them. If the cop stole shoes, then there's also the possibility he took cash, which would be even easier to get away. Even if the cop didn't take the cash, he screwed himself because now he's not trustworthy. The police investigators have to take the accusation seriously because he has a history of stealing from a suspect.
 
2013-10-23 04:48:12 PM  

Zombieman: megarian: DarkSoulNoHope: Police reported finding $1,060 in the raid, but Green said he had closer to $3,000.

Don't worry, you'll get your $200 back soon.

What's the point of even returning that $100 if you have to file an expensive case against them?

Exactly, I don't see him ever getting that $50 back.


His lawyer will get most of the $25 anyway.
 
2013-10-23 04:54:20 PM  

vento

Smartest
Funniest
2013-10-23 04:29:29 PM
Dirtybird971: Police reported finding $1,060 in the raid, but Green said he had closer to $3,000.

Should have gone bigger once he saw they stole stuff from him.

/prob legit.

Going bigger lends itself to the question as to why he had that much cash laying around. The "apartment" excuse is thin as it is - that's why people have a bank account.

/I believe the guy.


the bigger problem is when they "link" the money to drug proceeds and then it doesn't matter how much you say you had.
 
2013-10-23 04:55:53 PM  

vento: HideAndGoFarkYourself: I don't get this.  I've been a cop for awhile now, and have been a member of a SWAT team doing warrant services similar to this for years.  In that time I've come across big-time dealers with hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash, jewelry, cars, electronics, weapons, etc.  Not a single time have I ever been willing to risk my career, my livelihood or my retirement for any of it.

It's simply not worth it.  Even if these Jordan's were the $10,000 collectors type, it's still not worth it.

Furthermore, now it doesn't matter what the family says is missing, there's a thief who was in their house.  Do I believe at all that the guy had $3,000 that is now missing?  I do not, not for a second.  Will the family get $3,000 now? Yes.

This guy is pathetic, and he threw away his career for a few hundred bucks, at most a couple thousand.

Good work to the guys on his agency who turned him in, though.  Those guys should be commended.

I agree - with the exception that you don't believe the guy's story about the missing cash.  As an officer of the law, if the story were reversed, would you feel the same way?  I mean, all law enforcement officers are programmed to assume guilt - especially once one level of guilt has been established.  Given that, once the officer had been proven to have stolen the shoes, why would you doubt the guy's story that money had been taken as well?


An honest question.  I'll disagree, however, that all of us are programmed to assume guilt.  There are some, typically newer officers or ones that are just bad at their job, who assume guilt, and see evidence in such a way to support their view.  I don't.  I'm not saying I'm a great cop or anything like that, but I let the evidence tell me what happened.  More often than not, that means I'm airing on the side of not making an immediate arrest, but taking an opportunity for a more thorough review of the evidence involved, and likely involving a second viewpoint in my decisions.

As to the missing money; TFA says the guy is claiming to have had $3,000 in cash, and the PD is saying that they seized $1,060 in cash.  We know that at least 3 officers were involved in the raid, and quite likely....at least 10 more.  There's probably a 1 in 15 chance that the thief was the one who seized the money.

Then, there's the vast number of false complaints like this that come into police departments on a weekly basis.  I've been wrongly accused of stealing money out of a car while towing it before.  The entire inventory of the vehicle was on camera, and I was exonerated and criminal charges were filed against the accuser, after he (finally) admitted to making up the story about there being money in his car.

It's absolutely not uncommon for victims of thefts of one item, to then say additional items are missing.  We'll go take a burglary report, and an ipad is legitimately missing.  But, people see an opportunity to add things onto their insurance claims, and suddenly an XBOX, computer, camera, etc are missing too.

Like I said, it's possible, I just don't believe it.  If the story said that they'd recovered a large amount of money from the officer's house, i'd believe it.
 
2013-10-23 04:57:43 PM  

OnlyM3: Williams remains on restricted duty at the police department, which means he cannot carry a gun or badge.
I'm sure someone caught stealing from cops would be able to go home every night, keep his/her job and draw a nice salary too.

Fark every last cop. I hope every single one gets ass cancer.


Thanks! I'll let you know how my cornhole is.
 
2013-10-23 04:58:16 PM  

HideAndGoFarkYourself: US1: HideAndGoFarkYourself: I don't get this.  I've been a cop for awhile now, and have been a member of a SWAT team doing warrant services similar to this for years.  In that time I've come across big-time dealers with hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash, jewelry, cars, electronics, weapons, etc.  Not a single time have I ever been willing to risk my career, my livelihood or my retirement for any of it.

It's simply not worth it.  Even if these Jordan's were the $10,000 collectors type, it's still not worth it.

Furthermore, now it doesn't matter what the family says is missing, there's a thief who was in their house.  Do I believe at all that the guy had $3,000 that is now missing?  I do not, not for a second.  Will the family get $3,000 now? Yes.

This guy is pathetic, and he threw away his career for a few hundred bucks, at most a couple thousand.

Good work to the guys on his agency who turned him in, though.  Those guys should be commended.

Wow a fellow officer that is calling a spade a spade. Color me surprised!

It happens more than you think, to be honest.  I've arrested my fair share of police officers in my career, some of them were excellent cops, but my oath doesn't say anything about turning a blind eye to certain people simply because of what they do for a living.  In fact, our last SWAT warrant service was on a cop's house.

Cops are arrested a lot, and every time it happens, it's by another police officer.  That being said, I'm willing to bet this was not this officer's first theft on a warrant s oink oink oink oink oink oink oink oink...

 
2013-10-23 05:03:10 PM  
What is it with black men and shoes? They're worse than Carrie Bradshaw.
 
2013-10-23 05:08:14 PM  

rkiller1: WTF???
http://www.ebay.com/sch/Mens-Shoes-/93427/i.html?_from=R40&_dmd=1&_s op =16&_ipg=25&_nkw=air+jordan


$11,000 or best offer?  We need to write some product reviews.  Quick to the Farkmobile.
 
2013-10-23 05:28:31 PM  

PunGent: What kills me about stuff like this, it's just so low-rent.

Planting evidence for a $100,000 payoff?  I could see that.  I wouldn't condone it, but I could understand it.

Ruining your career over SNEAKERS?

It's like that admiral they caught with $1500 in fake casino chips...classless loser.

Can't even do PETTY crime right, ffs.


He had probably done it so many times he was sure he wouldn't be caught and by the time he saw the sneakers it was completely second nature to help himself.
 
2013-10-23 05:49:23 PM  

baronbloodbath: I have little to no sympathy for a guy who would just keep $3,000 in his house unsecured.  You can buy a safe for about 1/4 the cost of a pair of Air Jordans.


Cool. Send me your address, I'm gonna look around and help myself to any unsecured valuables I see just lying around.
 
2013-10-23 06:18:43 PM  
So there is a town which puts you in jail for running a red light?
 
2013-10-23 06:45:17 PM  
Subby, there is a pair.  It's singular.
 
2013-10-23 06:48:14 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: What is it with black men and shoes? They're worse than Carrie Bradshaw.


It's mind boggling.

They're just farking shoes. Made by some exploited and underpaid worker in some foreign sweatshop using less than a dollar's worth of rubber and plastic, and with a gigantic price mark-up that just ensures some white one percenters become even richer. Nice work supporting a system you probably claim you hate.

Mind you, it makes for easy identification, the louder and stupider looking the shoes, the louder and stupider the wearer usually is also.
 
2013-10-23 07:12:44 PM  

Nidiot: ecmoRandomNumbers: What is it with black men and shoes? They're worse than Carrie Bradshaw.

It's mind boggling.

They're just farking shoes. Made by some exploited and underpaid worker in some foreign sweatshop using less than a dollar's worth of rubber and plastic, and with a gigantic price mark-up that just ensures some white one percenters become even richer. Nice work supporting a system you probably claim you hate.

Mind you, it makes for easy identification, the louder and stupider looking the shoes, the louder and stupider the wearer usually is also.


So what do you overspend on? Fashion: have any watches, coats, jewelry? What are your hobbies: have any nice musical instruments, overpowered computers, excessively large TVs, fancy fishing rods or whatever? Do you have a car? I bet it's not a nice, practical used minivan. How is any of that different? This guy is the victim. What the police stole from him is immaterial.

Mind you, it makes for easy identification, the louder and stupider the generalization, the louder and stupider the speaker is also.
 
2013-10-23 07:34:32 PM  
Scrotastic Method:So what do you overspend on? Fashion: have any watches, coats, jewelry? What are your hobbies: have any nice musical instruments, overpowered computers, excessively large TVs, fancy fishing rods or whatever? Do you have a car? I bet it's not a nice, practical used minivan. How is any of that different? This guy is the victim. What the police stole from him is immaterial.

Mind you, it makes for easy identification, the louder and stupider the generalization, the louder and stupider the speaker is also.



I didn't mean he deserves to have them stolen. I never said he deserved to have them stolen. No one deserves to have anything stolen. Ever.

I was responding to the apparent worship of a couple of bits of stitched bits of plastic that are worn on your feet. As per what was brought up by  ecmoRandomNumbers: What is it with black men and shoes? They're worse than Carrie Bradshaw.

Actually, I don't have any of the items you mention, clothes are mostly op-shop buys, tv and computer are basic and do the job. You are right about my car, since my car is not a nice, practical used minivan, it's a nice, practical used hatchback.

But hey, if you want to worship some garish shoes go ahead. Just don't ever think everyone else in the world is as impressed with them as you are.
 
2013-10-23 07:34:54 PM  

Nidiot: ecmoRandomNumbers: What is it with black men and shoes? They're worse than Carrie Bradshaw.

It's mind boggling.

They're just farking shoes. Made by some exploited and underpaid worker in some foreign sweatshop using less than a dollar's worth of rubber and plastic, and with a gigantic price mark-up that just ensures some white one percenters become even richer. Nice work supporting a system you probably claim you hate.

Mind you, it makes for easy identification, the louder and stupider looking the shoes, the louder and stupider the wearer usually is also.


Stereotypes are so fun!  If you grew up in an environment where generations had to wear hand-me-downs because they were in such complete poverty then you would realize that new well maintained shoes show that you are not struggling financially which is a class symbol among those who have ever had to wear old shoes.  This standard, once set, leads people to continue to one-up the standard as a further show of financial success.  Generations of people do this smart and stupid, rich and even poor in an effort to project the class status they desire others to see.  Shoes mean a lot more when you have a lot less.  Perhaps that's not a situation you'd considered before painting them all as loud and stupid.

I have 4 pairs, work, casual, slippers, running.
 
2013-10-23 08:04:16 PM  

UseLessHuman: Nidiot: ecmoRandomNumbers: What is it with black men and shoes? They're worse than Carrie Bradshaw.

It's mind boggling.

They're just farking shoes. Made by some exploited and underpaid worker in some foreign sweatshop using less than a dollar's worth of rubber and plastic, and with a gigantic price mark-up that just ensures some white one percenters become even richer. Nice work supporting a system you probably claim you hate.

Mind you, it makes for easy identification, the louder and stupider looking the shoes, the louder and stupider the wearer usually is also.

Stereotypes are so fun!  If you grew up in an environment where generations had to wear hand-me-downs because they were in such complete poverty then you would realize that new well maintained shoes show that you are not struggling financially which is a class symbol among those who have ever had to wear old shoes.  This standard, once set, leads people to continue to one-up the standard as a further show of financial success.  Generations of people do this smart and stupid, rich and even poor in an effort to project the class status they desire others to see.  Shoes mean a lot more when you have a lot less.  Perhaps that's not a situation you'd considered before painting them all as loud and stupid.

I have 4 pairs, work, casual, slippers, running.


I see what you are saying, and I thank you for it being a thoughtful and intelligent post. Interestingly, the true 'haves' don't go showing off what they have, and don't care what others think, because they don't need to.  It's the middle level, those who are wanna-be's, or those who have the newly acquired, or borrowed, wealth, that go about being flashy and ostentatious.

Still personally I'm about as impressed by loud shoes as most people are by facial tattoos.
 
2013-10-23 08:29:11 PM  
"They is the bad guys, really,"


Is they be?
 
2013-10-23 08:29:53 PM  
I say, as punishment, make the cop wear the Jordans. If they are a newer pair, he will be borderline crippled within months. New Jordans can really hurt your feet. The quality of them have greatly decreased.
 
2013-10-23 10:06:01 PM  
Someone should tell Jennifer government.
 
2013-10-23 11:41:02 PM  
1a) A veteran police sergeant in North Texas was arrested Tuesday and accused of stealing fancy new tennis shoes during a drug raid.

1b)
 images4.wikia.nocookie.net

2a) "They is the bad guys, really," Marquis Green said. "They just got a badge on their side; that's the only thing."

2b) Bad grammar aside, THIS, for the most part.

/not all, but most
 
2013-10-24 10:45:30 AM  
HideAndGoFarkYourself:

It's absolutely not uncommon for victims of thefts of one item, to then say additional items are missing.  We'll go take a burglary report, and an ipad is legitimately missing.  But, people see an opportunity to add things onto their insurance claims, and suddenly an XBOX, computer, camera, etc are missing too.

Like I said, it's possible, I just don't believe it.  If the story said that they'd recovered a large amount of money from the officer's house, i'd believe it.


Thanks for your reply. A few points. I was a reporter in an area that suffered a pretty widely spread natural calamity. In the aftermath, one insurance company person remarked something to the effect of "people in your area eat a lot of steak and lobster" because of what they were writing off for spoiled food. I can see people doing this as a chance to "get something" because "who will know."

I'd reply that insurance companies will just raise average premia to compensate so, no, it isn't victimless.

I do a fair amount of elder care for insane relatives and what I tell people who are finding themselves in this situation is that some people will look upon incapacity of an elder relation as an ATM: so learn to control cheque books, limit the amount of cash around, inventory valuables, et cetera. Financial abuse of the elderly is a serious crime and no-one wants to hear about it. When it comes to light, it's because suddenly a large amount of money is missing.  In which case, go over every bank statement carefully going back years.

Why years?

It's a tremendous pain in the arse but yes, go back a few years. Because no-one starts with stealing a few thousand: they work up to it.

As far as this particular case goes, I am guessing that the stolen training shoes is not the first datum. I suspect that one "sticky fingers" incident for a small item is not enough for the his colleagues to slap the cuffs on him but that he's been cautioned informally.
 
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