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(YLE (Finland))   Finnish team discovers virus that causes Type 1 diabetes, announce progress toward a vaccine. Too stunned and happy to even attempt snark   (yle.fi ) divider line
    More: Cool, Finnish, diabetes, vaccines, clinical trials, polio  
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9507 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Oct 2013 at 1:33 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-10-22 12:13:59 PM  
7 votes:
Taking the vaccine through a clinical trial would cost some 700 million euros. Some funding is in place from the United States and from Europe, but more is required.

700 million euros: 964 million US dollars

Cost of one B-2 stealth bomber: 735 million dollars

nuff said?
2013-10-22 12:42:25 PM  
4 votes:

what_now: Diabeetus is caused by a virus? I would never have thought that.

Which is why I work in finance, not science.


I think there can be different triggers, but at it's core, Type-1 is an autoimmune disease where the body says, "f*ck you, pancreas! I don't need none of you no more!" And it realizes far too late that it had something special.
2013-10-22 02:27:51 PM  
3 votes:

shaddix: Type 1 CAN be caused by a virus, but that isn't the only cause. This will help some, but not the majority. The majority of people with type 1 DM have some environmental factor other than a virus that causes it. This is evidenced by the fact that identical twins do not always both get it. It's split about 50/50 if an identical twin gets Type 1 or not if the other sibling has it.


So it isn't possible for one twin to get the virus and the other not?
2013-10-22 12:35:57 PM  
3 votes:

what_now: Diabeetus is caused by a virus? I would never have thought that.

Which is why I work in finance, not science.


Insulin-dependent-because-your-pancreas-is-broken-diabeetus, not stop-ingesting-six-donuts-and-two-liters-of-soda-every-day-you-farking -moron-diabeetus.
2013-10-22 12:18:58 PM  
3 votes:
Diabeetus is caused by a virus? I would never have thought that.

Which is why I work in finance, not science.
2013-10-22 05:18:23 PM  
2 votes:

cretinbob: Chicken Pox vaccine is about paretal convenience.



WTF, no it's not. As someone that got chicken pox in early adulthood, I WISH the vaccine had been around when I was a kid, it sucked balls. Plus I now have the chance of getting shingles in my later life. So F off.

If you're a parent and don't want to prevent your child from getting a virus that can cause them and others they spread it to harm later in life you should just have an abortion an save us from your future typhoid mary.

what the hell is wrong with people in this thread.
2013-10-22 03:22:53 PM  
2 votes:

Odin's Other Eye: cretinbob: jst3p: cretinbob: Because no one gets pneumonia or the flu anymore

You do know that it is possible to immunize people from some viral infections, right?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polio_vaccine

You know that all type I diabetes isn't viral, right?

You know that the leading theory as to the trigger of the autoimmune response that causes Type 1 diabetes is a viral infection, right?


If I were a betting man I would wager he didn't know that.
2013-10-22 03:19:08 PM  
2 votes:

cretinbob: jst3p: cretinbob: Because no one gets pneumonia or the flu anymore

You do know that it is possible to immunize people from some viral infections, right?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polio_vaccine

You know that all type I diabetes isn't viral, right?


You know that the leading theory as to the trigger of the autoimmune response that causes Type 1 diabetes is a viral infection, right?
2013-10-22 03:15:53 PM  
2 votes:
Sofa King Smart:

a few days of fluids and insulin and then a fun trip to Riley's children's hospital and some quick education about how to test, measure out insulin in syringes and inject it... and we were back home... a year later they let us use a pump (omnipod)... and after another year we were allowed to get a CGM to help monitor and maintain healthy bg levels...


I met the guy who invented the Omnipod on a plane a year ago - he struck up a conversation with me, I asked him what he did, said he developed wearable devices for injecting medications, I said I was wearing one, he said "So am I!"

Really nice guy. He showed me the prototypes of the new smaller pod (should be out soon - is it out in the States yet?) and we talked about current research, especially the Joslin center trials of a closed-loop artificial pancreas )(BG monitor + pump) system. He thinks we'll have a more or less automatic closed-loop system in 5 years or so. I hope he's right :)
2013-10-22 02:36:25 PM  
2 votes:

shaddix: Type 1 CAN be caused by a virus, but that isn't the only cause. This will help some, but not the majority. The majority of people with type 1 DM have some environmental factor other than a virus that causes it. This is evidenced by the fact that identical twins do not always both get it. It's split about 50/50 if an identical twin gets Type 1 or not if the other sibling has it.


there are a LOT of theories about what triggers the auto-immune response... virus, diet, vitamin D deficiency, other non-viral environmental exposure...  the fact that both twins don't always develop full-on type 1 doesn't really rule any of the theories out... one could be exposed to the virus and the other wasn't... twins aren't always sitting around side-by-side holding hands and wearing identical clothing... some twins prefer to be split up in school classrooms...   type-1 seems to be more common in 'northern' climates.. leading to the vitamin D/sunshine thing...  type-1 also seems to appear in 'clusters'... lending credibility to the viral thing...  or maybe a combination of things... low vitamin D causes change in immune system.. then exposure to virus while immune system is compromised...   type-1 onsets seem to occur in the late winter early spring... again lending credibility to that vitamin D/sunshine/viral combination thing...
2013-10-22 02:32:48 PM  
2 votes:

Shostie: what_now: Diabeetus is caused by a virus? I would never have thought that.

Which is why I work in finance, not science.

I think there can be different triggers, but at it's core, Type-1 is an autoimmune disease where the body says, "f*ck you, pancreas! I don't need none of you no more!" And it realizes far too late that it had something special.


Personally, I find it awesome and win that they found the primary viral trigger for the more well-known of the autoimmune diabetes (diabetides?  Not sure there's a real plural for "diabetes").

(Yes, there are AT LEAST three different types of autoimmune diabetes.  The more well-known one, classical Type I, is where the immune system attacks the beta cells; it's been theorised for some time that there could well be a viral trigger that causes the autoimmune cascade, but nobody has known for sure which virus or viruses were responsible.

(There are also two other kinds of autoimmune diabetes.  One is a variation of Type I which includes other autoimmune disorders (most commonly celiac disease but sometimes also rheumatoid arthritis in addition to type I diabetes) which may have a viral trigger or may be part of a genetic autoimmunity disorder; there's some debate on whether this is a separate entity, but if it turns out that the "diabetes jab" doesn't prevent this type we know these are different entities.  The doctors who tend to recognise this as a separate form of diabetes informally tend to call this "type 1b diabetes" or other names that tend to focus on a general derangement that causes autoimmune disorders.  This, too, is a disorder where the body attacks the beta cells, and in addition also attacks other organs as well.

(The second one--only really recognised as its own type of diabetes in the past three or four years, really--is what is informally referred to as "type 1.5 diabetes" or "adult-onset autoimmune diabetes"; unlike the usual type I variants where the immune system tries to destroy the beta cells, "type 1.5" is an autoimmune disorder where the body attempts to attack insulin itself.  Historically, it's generally been misdiagnosed in past as a form of type II diabetes (hence the name) and, at least in its early stages, presents much more like type II than type I (in that it has an onset measured in "years" rather than "weeks"); people DO end up insulin-dependent with it, and it turns out it's a common cause of what has been referred to in past as "brittle diabetes" (people whom could not control diabetes well with normal doses of insulin).  As this has been only VERY recently recognised as a distinct type of diabetes, they're still working out the genetics of this (and there is a strong genetic component), much less autoimmunity triggers.  Fortunately, GLP-1 agonists DO seem to help keep the swings from getting TOO crazy in type 1.5, so it's the ONE kind of autoimmune diabetes where this tends to be recommended...)

Hell, even for Type II they're beginning to recognise a lot of different subtypes that are probably going to be split off into their own diabetes entities...in addition to "classical fatty-boombaladdy type II diabetes" it's being recognised that untreated PCOS is a common cause of type II diabetes in women (in these cases, it seems to be part and parcel of the general endocrine derangements that occur in PCOS; there are recorded cases where people have been cured of type II diabetes upon having surgery for large cysts caused by PCOS), there are some distinct genetic causes of what has been traditionally diagnosed as "type II" in indigenous communities (some of which may map over to "type 1.5" in actuality), and we're learning there is such a thing as "GLP-1 agonist sensitive" and "GLP-1 agonist resistant" type II diabetes--and the former seems to be less a problem with insulin use and more of a problem with how the body produces and uses a DIFFERENT hormone called incretin (which controls both insulin and glucagon production and use in the body)...as an aside, this was accidentally discovered when it was found that lap-band surgery cured many cases of type II diabetes even before the weight loss began.)

/kind of have the shiat running in my family, so I do research it--probable type 1.5 in my family, maybe if we are very very lucky the "kill the shiat out of insulin" diabetes has the same autoimmune trigger as the "kill the shiat out of your beta cells" diabetes...and if so, I'm lining up for the goddamn shot the DAY it becomes available
//and I hope someday they find a cheaper way of making GLP-1 agonists.  I swear, I think buying an actual Gila monster and annoying it on a daily basis to chew on the SO's arm would be cheaper than Vyctoza at this rate, LOL
2013-10-22 02:22:51 PM  
2 votes:
As long as Lilly doesn't step in and shut it down.
They are making a killing manufacturing and selling insulin and I doubt they will look kindly on loosing that income.
2013-10-22 02:19:31 PM  
2 votes:

happydude45: TheShavingofOccam123: what_now: Diabeetus is caused by a virus? I would never have thought that.

Which is why I work in finance, not science.

I had a friend who was certain she got the diabeetus after a few days of fever, loss of appetite, feeling rundown. She was active, not overweight, didn't have a terrible diet.

One of her nephews she hung around a lot in his youth also developed it after a few days of fever, loss of appetite, feeling rundown and at around the same age as she did. Maybe there's some dormancy with the virus. Who knows. but evidently she was correct. And btw they're Nordic stock. Doo dooddley doo doo.

Those symptoms occur after you islets have shut down but before you are diagnosed. That's your body responding to the elevated levels of sugar in your body.


this.

that feeling bad for a week or so with flu-like symptoms is called 'onset'.  supposedly your body can continue zipping along with fewer and fewer insulin producing islet cells (as either this virus or your own immune system are killing them off)... until you get down to about the last 10 percent...  then suddenly the few remaining cells can't produce enough insulin to keep up with the demand and you suddenly have elevated blood sugar that you've never had before... the malaise and flu-like symptoms are (DKA)  Diabetic ketoacidosis...
2013-10-22 02:15:04 PM  
2 votes:
Back in the 1970s, when my father had stomach ulcers, he was told that is was due to lifestyle choices..too much stress and spicy food was 'irritating' his stomach.

This was known as the 'businessman's disease' brought on by stress. Treatment was anti-stress medication, antacids and an extremely bland "white bread and chicken breast". No spices. No Herbs. No  Salt.  The only good thing was the doctor's note to your boss asking him to give you a break or a vacation.

Then in the early 80s, it was found that most ulcers were caused by Helicobacter pylori'

Yes. A bacterium. Fixable with antibiotics.  You rarely  hear about business executives "earning their ulcers" because of their stressful jobs any more.

Science marches on. Let's just hope this is not some scientist 'jumping the gun' before the peer review is done.
2013-10-22 01:58:29 PM  
2 votes:

jst3p: Carn: We gonna call it liveabeetus now?

Oh wow, a winrar is you!

If Chris Rock is correct (and I always assume he is) they wont cure it, just find a way to sell you medicine forever. You know how much money there is in the diabeetus game?


No Kidding, "Congratulations, you have diabetes!  Now here's the 10 pills you must take every day, you also need to buy these strips, theses needles and this machine and test you're blood 3 times a day!"
2013-10-22 01:47:23 PM  
2 votes:

cretinbob: Because no one gets pneumonia or the flu anymore


What an odd comment to make.
2013-10-22 12:39:19 PM  
2 votes:

BKITU: what_now: Diabeetus is caused by a virus? I would never have thought that.

Which is why I work in finance, not science.

Insulin-dependent-because-your-pancreas-is-broken-diabeetus, not stop-ingesting-six-donuts-and-two-liters-of-soda-every-day-you-farking -moron-diabeetus.


Yeah, I get the difference. My dad has type two, but in his case it was beer and candy his whole life.
2013-10-22 12:34:17 PM  
2 votes:
That is pretty significant if proven to be true and able to vaccinate to prevent.
2013-10-23 04:27:15 AM  
1 vote:
Terrible Old Man:

Exactly. This is the more rare type of diabetes that usually little kids/very young people get "just because fark you that's why" no matter what they do. Not the kind of diabetes old people/pigs worfing whole bags of doritos and a few gallons of mtn dew a day get.

So they're curing the kind that actually deserves a cure.


As a T1 diabetic, I am usually a diabetes snob, but there are plenty of Type 2 diabetics who didn't bring it on themselves, either. Not all Type 2 diabetes is lifestyle-related (but a lot of it is, and the current epidemic of T2 diabetes definitely is).
2013-10-22 05:12:11 PM  
1 vote:

snocone: roadkillontheweb: As long as Lilly doesn't step in and shut it down.
They are making a killing manufacturing and selling insulin and I doubt they will look kindly on loosing that income.

They are safe, Plenty of current patients in pipeline. But, it would be nice to shut down a lot of future PROFIT FROM HUMAN SUFFERING.


You people should go back to your conspiracy theory wack-a-doo websites.

If this vaccine/stopping this virus is the answer then whoever created this will be in the making vaccines for kids game forever (heaven forbid they profit from time and money they spent curing diabetes, what terrible humans). And Eli Lilly will still be making insulin for people that currently have diabetes and for fat people.
2013-10-22 05:08:38 PM  
1 vote:

Loreweaver: shaddix: Type 1 CAN be caused by a virus, but that isn't the only cause. This will help some, but not the majority. The majority of people with type 1 DM have some environmental factor other than a virus that causes it. This is evidenced by the fact that identical twins do not always both get it. It's split about 50/50 if an identical twin gets Type 1 or not if the other sibling has it.

Methinks you don't understand that the presence of a virus has nothing to do with genetics. As in, just because they are genetically identical does NOT mean they will both have the virus in their systems.


Put simply, per my endocrinologist - genetic disposition, environmental trigger.
2013-10-22 03:39:28 PM  
1 vote:

Odin's Other Eye: Sofa King Smart:

a few days of fluids and insulin and then a fun trip to Riley's children's hospital and some quick education about how to test, measure out insulin in syringes and inject it... and we were back home... a year later they let us use a pump (omnipod)... and after another year we were allowed to get a CGM to help monitor and maintain healthy bg levels...


I met the guy who invented the Omnipod on a plane a year ago - he struck up a conversation with me, I asked him what he did, said he developed wearable devices for injecting medications, I said I was wearing one, he said "So am I!"

Really nice guy. He showed me the prototypes of the new smaller pod (should be out soon - is it out in the States yet?) and we talked about current research, especially the Joslin center trials of a closed-loop artificial pancreas )(BG monitor + pump) system. He thinks we'll have a more or less automatic closed-loop system in 5 years or so. I hope he's right :)


Yes, my daughter just got one of the new pumps and it is great.
2013-10-22 03:30:41 PM  
1 vote:

Sofa King Smart: Odin's Other Eye: Sofa King Smart:

a few days of fluids and insulin and then a fun trip to Riley's children's hospital and some quick education about how to test, measure out insulin in syringes and inject it... and we were back home... a year later they let us use a pump (omnipod)... and after another year we were allowed to get a CGM to help monitor and maintain healthy bg levels...


I met the guy who invented the Omnipod on a plane a year ago - he struck up a conversation with me, I asked him what he did, said he developed wearable devices for injecting medications, I said I was wearing one, he said "So am I!"

Really nice guy. He showed me the prototypes of the new smaller pod (should be out soon - is it out in the States yet?) and we talked about current research, especially the Joslin center trials of a closed-loop artificial pancreas )(BG monitor + pump) system. He thinks we'll have a more or less automatic closed-loop system in 5 years or so. I hope he's right :)

cool.

we have the new smaller pods now... they've been out for a couple of months... but we had a three month supply of the old ones to use up before we could order the new ones.
I have mixed feelings about the 'artificial pancreas'... we've used various bg meters over the years and have had the Dexcom CGM for at least 3 years... and I've seen so many bad readings in both directions with all of them... I'd hate to have some automatic process injecting insulin based on those readings... a lot of the time they are good... but when they aren't... yikes!   Now having said that... the CGM seems to take some time to get 'dialed in' each time a new one is attached... with the Dexcom that is every 7 days... and it seem to take manual corrections to correct whatever variations with the insertion site/depth whatever for 6-8 hours and then your're pretty good for the rest of the 7 days...


We are supposed to be getting them here in Norway in a couple of months. Cue Hammertoe on the horrors of socialized medicine. ;)

Did you know you can reactivate your Dexcom after the 7 days and it'll be wicked accurate for another 7? It's not FDA approved, but it works.

Yeah, that's why it's taking so long to get out of trials. The danged thing has to be perfect, or it's going to kill somebody. Like me.
2013-10-22 03:28:41 PM  
1 vote:

Sofa King Smart: btw the wiki on the enterovirus is kind of frightening.


Apparently you need to be smarter than a jst3p to be frightened by it.
2013-10-22 03:25:52 PM  
1 vote:

Odin's Other Eye: Sofa King Smart:

a few days of fluids and insulin and then a fun trip to Riley's children's hospital and some quick education about how to test, measure out insulin in syringes and inject it... and we were back home... a year later they let us use a pump (omnipod)... and after another year we were allowed to get a CGM to help monitor and maintain healthy bg levels...


I met the guy who invented the Omnipod on a plane a year ago - he struck up a conversation with me, I asked him what he did, said he developed wearable devices for injecting medications, I said I was wearing one, he said "So am I!"

Really nice guy. He showed me the prototypes of the new smaller pod (should be out soon - is it out in the States yet?) and we talked about current research, especially the Joslin center trials of a closed-loop artificial pancreas )(BG monitor + pump) system. He thinks we'll have a more or less automatic closed-loop system in 5 years or so. I hope he's right :)


cool.

we have the new smaller pods now... they've been out for a couple of months... but we had a three month supply of the old ones to use up before we could order the new ones.
I have mixed feelings about the 'artificial pancreas'... we've used various bg meters over the years and have had the Dexcom CGM for at least 3 years... and I've seen so many bad readings in both directions with all of them... I'd hate to have some automatic process injecting insulin based on those readings... a lot of the time they are good... but when they aren't... yikes!   Now having said that... the CGM seems to take some time to get 'dialed in' each time a new one is attached... with the Dexcom that is every 7 days... and it seem to take manual corrections to correct whatever variations with the insertion site/depth whatever for 6-8 hours and then your're pretty good for the rest of the 7 days...
2013-10-22 03:17:30 PM  
1 vote:

Banned on the Run: soakitincider: as a type 1 diabetic it's good to see that a vaccine is being worked on, but for those of us that actually have it, we need a solution as well.

Until we figure out how to unring a bell, you're hosed :(


not true... if you know what caused the loss of islet cells (virus or immune response).. if it was actually the virus killing the insulin producing islet cells... you can get more of those (the problem in the past was that whatever was in the system that killed them in the first place would also kill any new ones)... but if it was the virus that was attacking islet cells... and they can produce a vaccine... then add back in some new functioning islet cells...  maybe?  something?

btw the wiki on the enterovirus is kind of frightening.
2013-10-22 03:15:01 PM  
1 vote:

jst3p: cretinbob: Because no one gets pneumonia or the flu anymore

You do know that it is possible to immunize people from some viral infections, right?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polio_vaccine


You know that all type I diabetes isn't viral, right?
2013-10-22 03:12:50 PM  
1 vote:

shaddix: Type 1 CAN be caused by a virus, but that isn't the only cause. This will help some, but not the majority. The majority of people with type 1 DM have some environmental factor other than a virus that causes it. This is evidenced by the fact that identical twins do not always both get it. It's split about 50/50 if an identical twin gets Type 1 or not if the other sibling has it.


Methinks you don't understand that the presence of a virus has nothing to do with genetics. As in, just because they are genetically identical does NOT mean they will both have the virus in their systems.
2013-10-22 03:09:17 PM  
1 vote:

Odin's Other Eye: that feeling bad for a week or so with flu-like symptoms is called 'onset'.  supposedly your body can continue zipping along with fewer and fewer insulin producing islet cells (as either this virus or your own immune system are killing them off)... until you get down to about the last 10 percent...  then suddenly the few remaining cells can't produce enough insulin to keep up with the demand and you suddenly have elevated blood sugar that you've never had before... the malaise and flu-like symptoms are (DKA)  Diabetic ketoacidosis...

That's more or less what I had happen. Got the flu, and it never really got better, and then within two months I was in the emergency room, and the doctors were telling me I was lucky to be alive.


my youngest son developed type1 about two weeks before his 12th birthday.  we had taken him to his regular doctor once and the emergency after hours clinic twice... they all said the same thing... oh, must be the flu... its going around, you know...  then the monday after the weekend visits we had scheduled another appt with his regular doctor... at that point he was weak and could barely walk... their first attempt at a bg test with a meter just read 'high' (so he was above 500)... quick trip to emergency room  they thought his bg was over 1000 although at that level its difficult to measure since a 'normal' range is between 80-120 or so... a few days of fluids and insulin and then a fun trip to Riley's children's hospital and some quick education about how to test, measure out insulin in syringes and inject it... and we were back home... a year later they let us use a pump (omnipod)... and after another year we were allowed to get a CGM to help monitor and maintain healthy bg levels...  he'll turn 18 in a few months... would love for him to be able to get a vaccine... some new islets cells and be back to normal for the rest of his life... it's been a rough 5 years... I can't imagine how people dealt with this back in the days before reliable testers...
2013-10-22 02:56:23 PM  
1 vote:

happydude45: soakitincider: as a type 1 diabetic it's good to see that a vaccine is being worked on, but for those of us that actually have it, we need a solution as well.

My daughter has it. One step at a time, they have to identify the cause before they can cure what it causes.


Unfortunately for your daughter, a vaccine that kills the virus is not the same thing as restoring normal pancreas function.
2013-10-22 02:55:39 PM  
1 vote:

shaddix: Type 1 CAN be caused by a virus, but that isn't the only cause. This will help some, but not the majority. The majority of people with type 1 DM have some environmental factor other than a virus that causes it. This is evidenced by the fact that identical twins do not always both get it. It's split about 50/50 if an identical twin gets Type 1 or not if the other sibling has it.


Homosexuality is less than 50/50, and everyone knows that it's caused by some as of yet unidentified gene, so I don't see where you're going with this.
2013-10-22 02:31:47 PM  
1 vote:

snocone: They are safe, Plenty of current patients in pipeline.  But, it would be nice to shut down a lot of future PROFIT FROM HUMAN SUFFERING.


Good luck, capitalism is here to stay.
2013-10-22 02:31:42 PM  
1 vote:

shaddix: Type 1 CAN be caused by a virus, but that isn't the only cause. This will help some, but not the majority. The majority of people with type 1 DM have some environmental factor other than a virus that causes it. This is evidenced by the fact that identical twins do not always both get it. It's split about 50/50 if an identical twin gets Type 1 or not if the other sibling has it.


Because all twins get sick exactly at the same time during flu and cold season.
2013-10-22 02:31:08 PM  
1 vote:

roadkillontheweb: As long as Lilly doesn't step in and shut it down.
They are making a killing manufacturing and selling insulin and I doubt they will look kindly on loosing that income.


They are safe, Plenty of current patients in pipeline. But, it would be nice to shut down a lot of future PROFIT FROM HUMAN SUFFERING.
2013-10-22 02:26:13 PM  
1 vote:
Type 1 CAN be caused by a virus, but that isn't the only cause. This will help some, but not the majority. The majority of people with type 1 DM have some environmental factor other than a virus that causes it. This is evidenced by the fact that identical twins do not always both get it. It's split about 50/50 if an identical twin gets Type 1 or not if the other sibling has it.
2013-10-22 02:11:56 PM  
1 vote:

soakitincider: as a type 1 diabetic it's good to see that a vaccine is being worked on, but for those of us that actually have it, we need a solution as well.


My daughter has it. One step at a time, they have to identify the cause before they can cure what it causes.
2013-10-22 02:05:04 PM  
1 vote:
as a type 1 diabetic it's good to see that a vaccine is being worked on, but for those of us that actually have it, we need a solution as well.
2013-10-22 01:57:07 PM  
1 vote:

Unoriginal_Username: Genju: I_Am_Weasel: miss diminutive: Taking the vaccine through a clinical trial would cost some 700 million euros. Some funding is in place from the United States and from Europe, but more is required.

700 million euros: 964 million US dollars

Cost of one B-2 stealth bomber: 735 million dollars

nuff said?

Are you saying we should just bomb people with diabetes and save 231 million dollars!?

It's an interest plan, but those bombs cost money too!  When all is said and done, you're looking at savings of only about 30 million.

Still, a penny saved...

You're not factoring in ammo. Although I did just get a comical image in my head of a B-2 swooping down on fat people riding one of those assistance carts and opening the landing gear to hit them with a wheel.

Think of how easy it would be to do? All the pilot would need to do is type 'Walmart' into google earth. Plotting a flight path would be a cake walk


That would also lower the number of "employed" people making so little they require government assistance. Like a bingo game in an elevator, this is a winner on many levels!
2013-10-22 01:51:12 PM  
1 vote:

cretinbob: Because no one gets pneumonia or the flu anymore


You do know that it is possible to immunize people from some viral infections, right?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polio_vaccine
2013-10-22 01:47:40 PM  
1 vote:

jst3p: what_now: Diabeetus is caused by a virus? I would never have thought that.

Which is why I work in finance, not science.

I love my job until I hear about people who get to make a real difference in the world.


hahaha- I know. I'm all "Woohooo! I made a pivot table!!" and these Finns are all "Woo hoo! I found the cure for Wilfred Brimley's mustache!"
2013-10-22 01:47:28 PM  
1 vote:

Weatherkiss: Is this legit or one of these science news stories we never hear about again?


Pre trial clinical results are a long way from an actual drug. It's not bad news at all, but most potential drugs fail trials, and you don't even start trials unless you already have promising pre trial results. So you may never hear about it again. Or maybe you will.
2013-10-22 01:39:09 PM  
1 vote:

what_now: Diabeetus is caused by a virus? I would never have thought that.

Which is why I work in finance, not science.


I had a friend who was certain she got the diabeetus after a few days of fever, loss of appetite, feeling rundown. She was active, not overweight, didn't have a terrible diet.

One of her nephews she hung around a lot in his youth also developed it after a few days of fever, loss of appetite, feeling rundown and at around the same age as she did. Maybe there's some dormancy with the virus. Who knows. but evidently she was correct. And btw they're Nordic stock. Doo dooddley doo doo.
2013-10-22 01:37:28 PM  
1 vote:

miss diminutive: Taking the vaccine through a clinical trial would cost some 700 million euros. Some funding is in place from the United States and from Europe, but more is required.

700 million euros: 964 million US dollars

Cost of one B-2 stealth bomber: 735 million dollars

nuff said?


I can't use a vaccine to murder brown people who don't believe what I believe.
2013-10-22 01:37:09 PM  
1 vote:
2013-10-22 01:36:57 PM  
1 vote:

what_now: Diabeetus is caused by a virus? I would never have thought that.

Which is why I work in finance, not science.


No kidding. Science people get to do all the cool stuff. This is great news. Can the vaccine be mixed into cupcake frosting? Because that would be awesome.
2013-10-22 01:35:58 PM  
1 vote:
Is this legit or one of these science news stories we never hear about again?
2013-10-22 01:09:08 PM  
1 vote:
I have a paternal aunt with type I so I have been following these stories for decades and I feel like nothing ever gets past trials in mice. But hope springs eternal so I'll keep hoping.
2013-10-22 12:44:00 PM  
1 vote:
stupid pancreas
 
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