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(The New York Times)   NYC considers replacing current subway cars with long single-car articulated trains, enabling the panhandlers, clouds of BO and trickles of urine to flow freely   (nytimes.com) divider line 31
    More: Scary, subway cars, trains, 23rd Street, Metro  
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3198 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Oct 2013 at 10:33 AM (25 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-10-21 10:40:43 AM
Scary?

We've got them in Toronto and I prefer them. Higher capacity, a nice long view down the train (fun to watch it bend), and the search for seats helps spread people out.

The only downside (as I understand it) is that if something breaks, it's more likely to take the whole train out of service, as opposed to simply a single car.
 
2013-10-21 10:44:59 AM
yes, it makes it one whole train, so yeah, it breaks the whole thing.

another benifit however, not mentioned in the article is that in case of a derailment, articulated trains can't jack knife. makes them a little safer like that.
 
2013-10-21 10:46:33 AM
 
2013-10-21 10:48:24 AM
A lot of people give the subway shiat, but NYC isn't even the worst network.
 
2013-10-21 10:54:04 AM

Cerebral Knievel: another benifit however, not mentioned in the article is that in case of a derailment, articulated trains can't jack knife


Instead, the trains just fold up like the '07 Mets.
 
2013-10-21 10:54:59 AM

duffblue: A lot of people give the subway shiat, but NYC isn't even the worst network.


Who says it's the worst? The stations are kind of small, dark, and grimy, but it's by far the most functional, fastest system I've used. Goes everywhere you want and there's rarely a long wait for the next train.

//Complainers about NY or DC should spend a year riding MARTA in Atlanta to experience a truly lame system.
 
2013-10-21 10:55:54 AM
I love the new articulated subway cars we have in Toronto. We've had them for 2 years and they are still fun to ride in. I just wish they were on all lines, not just the Yonge-University-Spadina line. Maybe one day.
 
2013-10-21 10:58:25 AM
Almost no other subway or transit system runs 24/7. That alone makes New York's one of the most useful public transit networks in the world.

I can see the 7NQ trains from my window in LIC.  The fact that I can, if the whim takes me, walk out of my apartment at 3:00am, get on one of those trains, and get Thai food in Manhattan on a Thursday is the main rason I live here.
 
2013-10-21 11:04:43 AM
pktloss: ...a nice long view down the train (fun to watch it bend)...

I rode one like this in Singapore some years back. VERY weird to see.
 
2013-10-21 11:05:00 AM

dukeblue219: duffblue: A lot of people give the subway shiat, but NYC isn't even the worst network.

Who says it's the worst? The stations are kind of small, dark, and grimy, but it's by far the most functional, fastest system I've used. Goes everywhere you want and there's rarely a long wait for the next train.

//Complainers about NY or DC should spend a year riding MARTA in Atlanta to experience a truly lame system.


Hey now, both MARTA stops are pretty nice.
 
2013-10-21 11:10:33 AM
From a space saving standpoint it makes perfect sense but it also means that the unbathed guy's face-melting pong will literally be inescapable.
 
2013-10-21 11:14:58 AM
But, how will Daniel Craig dramatically change carriages now?
 
2013-10-21 11:18:00 AM
As a resident, I am ALL for this.  They have them all over Europe.

Too many times you get stuck in a car with no AC, or, even worse, a really smelly homeless person.  And you're stuck until the next station.

Any NY'er knows to avoid an empty subway car when the train pulls in.  Hint, it's empty for a reason.
 
2013-10-21 11:26:49 AM

pktloss: "Scary?

We've got them in Toronto and I prefer them. Higher capacity, a nice long view down the train (fun to watch it bend), and the search for seats helps spread people out.

The only downside (as I understand it) is that if something breaks, it's more likely to take the whole train out of service, as opposed to simply a single car."



Toronto has its problems, but isn't New York. Today, if you get in a subway car and there's a creep, a ranting schizophrenic, a belligerent beggar, a screechy "musician", an out-of-order A/C, or -- this is the worst -- a subway dweller that hasn't bathed or changed clothes in months whose...err, aura pervades the ENTIRE car and makes it completely unbearable to be in it (this is worse and more common than you think), you can just move to the next car. With a single-car train there is nowhere to escape. One person can now ruin an entire commute for 500+ people instead of 50. That's the downside.


Also, relevant: A Nut in Every Car.
 
2013-10-21 11:27:46 AM

There's Always A Bloody Ghost: I love the new articulated subway cars we have in Toronto. We've had them for 2 years and they are still fun to ride in. I just wish they were on all lines, not just the Yonge-University-Spadina line. Maybe one day.


Maybe one day we will have all the lines we were supposed to have by 1980, but I wouldn't hold your breath
 
2013-10-21 11:29:04 AM

tripleseven: As a resident, I am ALL for this.  They have them all over Europe.

Too many times you get stuck in a car with no AC, or, even worse, a really smelly homeless person.  And you're stuck until the next station.

Any NY'er knows to avoid an empty subway car when the train pulls in.  Hint, it's empty for a reason.


New Yorker's seem to have no issue walking between cars, despite all the signs telling them not to. As a Canadian, even watching this flagrant rule-breaking makes me uncomfortable.

As a Torontonian - the articulated ones are great, because even if you had to dash onto the train at the last moment, you can walk the whole length of the thing; positioning yourself to exit the train at the correct spot for whatever exit you have to use at your destination.
 
2013-10-21 11:30:00 AM

Infamy: New Yorker's


Just kill me, if shame doesn't kill me first.
 
2013-10-21 11:33:55 AM

Infamy: tripleseven: As a resident, I am ALL for this.  They have them all over Europe.

Too many times you get stuck in a car with no AC, or, even worse, a really smelly homeless person.  And you're stuck until the next station.

Any NY'er knows to avoid an empty subway car when the train pulls in.  Hint, it's empty for a reason.

New Yorker's seem to have no issue walking between cars, despite all the signs telling them not to. As a Canadian, even watching this flagrant rule-breaking makes me uncomfortable.

As a Torontonian - the articulated ones are great, because even if you had to dash onto the train at the last moment, you can walk the whole length of the thing; positioning yourself to exit the train at the correct spot for whatever exit you have to use at your destination.


Depending on the train.  The case with the older trains on the IND line is the doors are locked.
 
2013-10-21 11:47:04 AM
subby's mom took an articulated train last night

because she works the late shift in toronto

/I'll be taking the F train downton later. oh-yeah
 
2013-10-21 11:53:44 AM

iheartscotch: But, how will Daniel Craig dramatically change carriages now?


Bond will always have the tube.

Superman hasn't had a proper changing booth for decades now.
 
2013-10-21 12:14:32 PM
Gee, every other country in the world has a much simpler solution....let people walk through the doors at the end of the cars.
 
2013-10-21 12:15:34 PM
New York Transit Museum

Any transport/subway nerd who hasn't been out to see this gem in Brooklyn is missing out. Make sure to get a guided tour. I
 
2013-10-21 12:52:24 PM
img.gawkerassets.com


Why yes, that is a man eating a runny brie on the subway.
 
2013-10-21 12:56:16 PM

duffblue: A lot of people give the subway shiat, but NYC isn't even the worst network.


It's a marvel of engineering and I have a soft spot in my heart for it. I also have no doubt that this is a bad idea, because if it weren't, it would have been proposed a long time ago. I can hear the grumbling from maintenance personnel already. All of the infrastructure is designed for a very carefully measured standard car size. If you mess that up by even an inch, it will cause a lot of problems bringing cars in to be serviced, turning them around, storing them to clean or repair, and moving them through the yards.

A one-car train won't allow for flexibility increasing and decreasing the number of cars on the train for different uses, like peak times.

I can only imagine the headache such a change would cause. Hundred-year-old mechanical systems are even more resistant to change than grumpy train yard staff.
 
2013-10-21 12:58:46 PM

TheDirtyNacho: [img.gawkerassets.com image 850x850]


Why yes, that is a man eating a runny brie on the subway.


that's not beaver cheese?
 
2013-10-21 01:11:55 PM
dukeblue219:
//Complainers about NY or DC should spend a year riding MARTA in Atlanta to experience a truly lame system.

I concur. MARTA blows in comparison to the NYC subway, London's Tube, and Paris's Metro.  MARTA has just four rail lines with very little penetration into most of Atlanta, and practically none outside the perimeter.  It's convenient for getting to the airport, but that's about it for most people.

However, we live halfway between the gold and red lines, which means we're some of the very few people in this city who find it convenient to ride MARTA on a daily basis.

/rides MARTA every day to work
 
2013-10-21 01:36:23 PM
468 train stations in the NYC subway system. Only two are not open 24/7/365, and both are in the financial district: Broad Street and Fulton Street on the J. The former is right in front of the NYSE and just 150 feet away from the Wall Street station on the 4/5 lines, and the latter has transfer tunnels to the 2/3 4/5 and A/C lines (and possibly soon to the R line at Cortlandt)
 
2013-10-21 01:45:47 PM
*yawn*

The BMT had plenty of articulated cars in the 20's 30's 40's.

Also, the point about a car breaking and having to yank the entire train is moot:  NYC subway trains are made up of sets of linked cars - typically 2 sets of 5 cars linked together.  The NYCTA's been running this way for decades now.

/The better cars MDBF is approaching 500,000 miles, even the crappy old stuff is typically over 100,000
 
2013-10-21 02:07:11 PM
I imagine we'll have articulated subway cars right after they get the T line up and running.

thatsthejoke.gif
 
2013-10-21 03:26:14 PM

spmkk: With a single-car train there is nowhere to escape. One person can now ruin an entire commute for 500+ people instead of 50.


That's a bit of an exaggeration. Trains are what, 200-300 yards long? It's pretty hard for someone to ruin your commute from 100+ yards away.
 
2013-10-21 05:36:40 PM

Jument: spmkk: With a single-car train there is nowhere to escape. One person can now ruin an entire commute for 500+ people instead of 50.

That's a bit of an exaggeration. Trains are what, 200-300 yards long? It's pretty hard for someone to ruin your commute from 100+ yards away.


You've obviously not been on a NYC subway car with a stinky homeless person.
 
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